Issue: 19601001

Saturday, October 1, 1960
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October
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Friday, July 11, 2014
8/4/2016 12:46:56 AM

Articles
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[The following text appears on the cover]
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Corval
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Triumph
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Book-Of-The-Month Club, Inc.
Book Club
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W.A. Taylor & Company.
Booths Gin
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article
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5
From the Editor
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Playbill
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Playboy Contributing Editor Ken Purely has been contributing postcards to the Chicago office on the average of one and a half per day. They are usually cryptic, often personal, occasionally randy, and always work-stopping. It is unnerving, for example, in the middle of a frantic deadline morning, to have one's secretary (her pretty brow furrowed by puzzlement) bring in a Kcncard that says no more than: "achtung! Antony. Count Fugger, lived from 1493 to 1560. The one-gulden undated coin of his reign, and the one-ducat, 1622, are worth S125 on the gold coin market." Ken's minuscule missives are sometimes decorated with small collages of colored paper and Scotch tape; one bore a pasted-down newspaper clipping followed by an original poem. The clipping, headlined Eagle Attacks copter, dies, read: "A large golden eagle attacked a helicopter in the Alpine foothills south of Grenoble, France, yesterday. The mutilated body of the bird, whose wingspread measured seven feet, was found by children." The appended Purely poesy went like so: "Ah, Noble Bird, tints to dare, and, daring, die/ Ignominiously ground to eagleburger. high in Alpine SkyWith what thoughts didsl scream the clarion challenge call,/ And didst remember, rotor-smitten, You Can't Fight City Hall?" Such blazing bursts of creativity would drain a lesser man, but Purdy tosses them into the air like bread crumbs to blue jays and still has plenty of energy left to write articles and fiction for playboy. Turn, for instance, to this issue's lead story, The Book of Tony. No postcard trifle, this is a big yarn and a good one. done in the bright, hard, contemporaneous, deliciously mean, quintessentially Purdean style.
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tableOfContents
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Table of Contents
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Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
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Playbill..........5
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Copyright
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General Offices, Playboy Building, 232 E. Ohio street, Chicago 11, Illinios. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings and photographs submitted if they are to be returned and no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. Contents copyrighted © 1960 by HMH publishing co., INC. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. Any similarity between the people and places in the fiction and semi-fiction in this magazine and any real people and places is purely coincidental. Credits: cover design by Arthur Paul. Collage by Bea Pall, photography by Vic Skrebneski; p. 45 photo by playboy studio : p. 55 photo by Playboy Studio; p. 56, 57 photos by Don Bronstein: p. 74-75 photos by Don Bronstein; p. 76 photo by Pompeo Ornitz (2) : p. 95 photos by Ornitz (3) , Mario Casilli, Bob Willoughby, Paul Morton Snith; p. 96 photos by Frank Bez, William Claxton, Burr Jerger, Smith, Casilli; p. 9 7 photos by Tom Kelley. Sherman Weisburd, Ornitz, Lawrence Schiller, Willoughby: p. 98 photos by Ornitz (5) , Ron Vogel; p. 99 photos by Frank Schallwig, Ornitz, Casilli; p. 100 photos by Ornitz (4) , John mechling, Casilli (2), Meyer; P.101 Photo by Patrick Morin; p.102 photo by Sherman Weisburd; p. 109-113 photos by Don Bronstein, Pompeo Posar, Vincent Tajiri, Arthur Paul.
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Masthead
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Masthead
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Hugh M. Hefner editor and publisher
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Columbia Record Club
Record Club
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Hiram Walker & Sons Inc.
Walkers
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Lanvin
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Letters to the Editor
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Dear Playboy
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Address Playboy Magazine
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Indicia
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Indicia
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Playboy Subscriptions: In the U.S.. Its Possessions, the Pan American Union and Canada, $14 for Three Years, $11 for Two Years. $6 for One Year. Elsewhere Add $3 per year for Foreign Postage. Allow 30 days for New Subscriptions and Renewals,Change of Address: Send both old and New Addresses and allow 30 days for change. Advertising: How, Ard W, Lederer, Advertising Director, 720 Fifth Avenue, New York 19, New York, C1 5.2620: Advertising Production, Playboy Building, 232 East Ohid Street, Chicago 11, Illinois, M1 2.1000: Los Angeles Representative, Blanchard-Nichols Associates. 633 South WestMoreland Avenue, Los Angeles 5, California, DU 8.6134: San Francisco Representative, Blan, Chand,Nichols Associates, Phillips and Van Orden Building, 900 Third Street, San Francisco 7. California, YU 6.6341: SouthEastern Representative, SouthEast Advertising Sales, Chamber of Commerce Building, Miami 32, Florida, FR 1.2103.
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Cricketeer
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Truval
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Jose Cuervo Tequila
Jose Cuervo Tequila
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Corval
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Chanel
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review
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Review
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Playboy After Hours
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We recently bemoaned the language inflation that turns a trusted bartender into a "beverage host" or a garbage collector into a "sanitation engineer." Our distaste for such lingo lunacy doesn't end with our stand on job titles. Another kind of euphemism that's beginning to bug us is the increasing tendency of cocktail lounges toward cloying cuteness in naming those two doors at the rear – the ones previously, and sanely, labeled men and women. Variations on the basic theme have gone beyond boys and girls or ladies and gentlemen. At a club frequented by members of the acting profession, you find romeo and juliet. At a jazz-filled den, there are rooms for cats and kittens. Or, depending on the decor of the place, such labels as mares and stallions, lords and ladies, squaws and braves. A gent under the influence, his brain befogged, might conceivably be led through the wrong portal by this coy practice. On the other hand, and in the nick of time, we can find no fault with the sensible legends on the washroom doors of our own Club: playboys and Playmates.
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Kaywoodie
Kaywoodie
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Review
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Acts and Entertainments
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We've been intrigued of late by the sizzling comeback of Vic Damone. He packed the house, like they say, during a recent stand at Chicago's Trade Winds, then repeated the feat during a sevenday stint at Hollywood's Cloister. The evening we caught him at the latter spot, a rapt audience, including a ringside circle of celebs, witnessed an electrifying performance. Whether belting a strong Falling in Love with Love or warmly caressing You Are Too Beautiful, Vic exploited to the full his rich baritone pipes and a stage presence relaxed to the somewhat corny point of borrowing a Scotch-on-the-rocks from a front-row table. The Damone act reached a stand-up climax with a porgy and Bess medley –: Bess, you Is My Woman Now; It Ain't Necessarily So; Oh, Where Is My Bess? –: that earned him a full five minutes of applause. After seven encores, Damone attempted to beg off. The audience would have none of it and brought him back for a final, rocking version of Born to Wander. "I feel a confidence and self-assurance I've never had before," he told us later in his dressing room, after dozens of well-wishers had departed. He stressed that his recent conversion to Bashaism, a Persian faith that teaches equality and unity of all religions, is the vital factor in shaping his new outlook. The old Damone, who had a tendency to apologize for everything he did and could destroy with one intemperate remark on stage what had taken much effort to build, is no more. In his place is a very swinging Bahaist indeed, and we wish him well.
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Shave Talc.
Shave Talce
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Soundcraft Corp.
Soundcraft
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Phonola
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Dynel
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Review-Recorded Music
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Recordings
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Sketches of Spain (Columbia) showcases trumpeter Miles Davis in a solemn setting, with studio orchestra arranged for and conducted by Gil Evans. Contents include a rewritten and extended middle section from classical composer Joa-quin Rodrigo's Concierto de Aranjuez, a brief segment from Manuel de Falla's ballet, El Amor Brujo, and three folk melodies – The Pan Piper, Saela and Solea. Evans' shifting waves of sound, framing and inspiring Miles, are monumentally memorable, while Miles' blowing glitters throughout. As evidence of Miles' ease in the traditional Spanish idiom on his first try, and as another strong link in the Evans-Davis chain of LPs, this is exquisite.
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Holeproof
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Sir Walter Raleigh
Sir Walter Raleigh
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Old Spice
Short Cut
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Paris
Paris
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Females By Cole
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Audio Fidelity, Inc.
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Van Heusen
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Roquefort
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review
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Dining-Drinking
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The Pacific stretch from Big Sur (where Henry Miller's the resident sage) north to the Monterey-Carmel peninsula (land of jazz and Bach festivals) cradles several of California's most enticing dining spots. The gathering place for thirsty and hungry ones at Big Sur is Nepenthe (thirty miles south of Carmel, right off Highway 1), a hilltop-hugging redwood and adobe creation attracting all sorts of arty folk. You can't make a reservation (the place has no phone), so you'll have to take your chances of being seated. You may walk in on a chamber music concert, poetry reading by Stephen Spender or the word on Zen by Alan Watts, from Tuesday through Sunday, noon till midnight. Dinners feature an Ambrosiaburger ($1.25), a half of roast chicken ($2.50) or a generous New York-cut steak ($5). After the repast, the Original Nepenthe C&C, a Chartreuse and Cognac combo, makes for good company. Just remember that the Greek word népenthés means "no pain" and join in accordingly. From Sur, take the curvaceous drive up the Coast Highway through Pebble Beach to Monterey where, at the far end of Cannery Row, you'll find a hideaway named Kalissa's. There, lip-smacking Wiener Schnitzel and other German specialties are the rule. And check on the after-hours jazz sessions which pack the upstairs dining room. While you're in Monterey, don't miss a visit to Gallatin's (500 Hartnell), a Nineteenth Century edifice with "authentic" California-Victorian interior. Try Gallatin's-own Abalone Puffs ($1.25) or a heartily flavored casserole of mushrooms a la Cremc George ($1.50). Steak and Oyster Pie ($3.35) is the Thursday special. If you're going to linger in town, note that special dishes at Gallatin's (ordered in advance) are extraordinary: like roasted bull's head a la Plutarch with floral wreaths and pastry horns; suckling pig adorned with edible earrings, necklace, anklets and tail bows: chicken in champagne sauce and – in season – whole fresh Monterey Bay King Chinook salmon baked Proquinto in the Philippine manner. Delights, one and all.
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Sheaffer's
Pen Sheaffers
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review
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Review-Films
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Films
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Inherit the Wind, the only-the-names-changed version of the Scopes "monkey" trial, is considerably less effective and often more stagy as a film than it was as a Broadway production. Certainly a good deal of the blame rests in the script; as was the case on Broadway, the characters are drawn with a heavy hand. Director Stanley Kramer's penchant for blatant caricature only compounds the felony, therefore. Especially unbelievable is Spencer Tracy as the Clarence Darrow character – the defense attorney for the young schoolteacher who started all the ruckus by daring to tell his students about Darwin's ideas, thereby violating both a state law and the fundamentalists' creed. It's difficult to imagine how Darrow could ever have won a single case if he had been the irascible person Tracy portrays. As the William Jennings Bryan figure, presenting the case for that old-time religion and the state of Tennessee, Fredric March is a patched-up, over-inflated old windbag. Just as Bryan must have been something- else than a tubful of bathos, we know that H. L. Mencken was less literary in his language, and in character little like the obnoxious buffoon observing matters at the trial. Gene Kelly, who plays the role, is the only principal to manage credibility – some of the time. Doubtless this film will be praised for its "courage," but although it indeed took courage to defend Scopes – and Darwin – in 1925, it doesn't take much in 1960.
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Plymouth
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College Hall FAshions Inc.
College Hall
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Allied Impex Corp.
Camara
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Daroff
Daroff
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review
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Review-Books
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Books
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"For whom do you compose?" Robert Craft asks Igor Stravinsky in Memories and Commentaries (Doubleday, $3.95), and the Twentieth Century's greatest composer replies, "For myself and the hypothetical other." The little book is a worthy companion piece to Conversations with Ipor Stravinsky (Playboy After Hours, August 1959): it bristles with anecdote, fond reminisce, barbed opinion, wit, musical erudition, and what often seems like a lofty intellectualism, although Stravinsky says "Intellectuals never have any real taste." Stravinsky describes his childhood as "a period of waiting for the moment when I could send everyone and everything connected with it to hell" but warmly recalls "the violent Russian spring that seemed to begin in an hour and was like the whole earth cracking." The maiîre opines on stereo: "Our two ears are about six inches apart, whereas the stereo microphones which hear a live orchestra for us are sometimes as much apart as sixty feet. We do not hear live performances stereophonically ... I say this not to criticize stereo, however, but to question the meaniitg of 'high fidelity.' Fidelity to what?" Foundations, like the Ford and Rockefeller, which commission music, "are really only buying up surplus symphonies as the government buys up surplus corn." He puts down "the false virtuoso . . . who should begin his recitals with the encores, since they are what he plays best" and the kind ol music critic who writes "the strings sounded like velvet" ("Strings should sound like strings") and a bad conductor whose beat "was like hot plasticine." He relates a Hollywood experience: "I was offered $100,000 to pad a film with music, and when I refused, was told that I could receive the same money if I were willing to allow someone else to compose the music in my name." Obliged, during World War II, to begin his concerts with The Star-Spangled Banner, he rearranged the anthem because all the existing arrangements were "very poor," but "my major seventh chord in the second strain of the piece, the part patriotic ladies like best, must have embarrassed some high official": in Boston (1944) a police commissioner confiscated the arrangement because of "a Massachusetts law forbidding any 'tampering' with national properly." Of the words "decadent" and "modern," he says they were interchangeable in the early 1900s "whereas 'decadent' now very often means 'not modern enough.' " Stories abound re: Diaghilev (who considered heteroscxuality "morbid " and tried unsuccessfully to convert Stravinsky to his persuasion), Nijinsky, Scriabin, Glazunov, et al.; there are letters from Diaghilev, Nijinsky, Gidc, Falla, Auden and others. Three Stravinsky operas are discussed in detail, and the original scenario of one, The Rake's Progress, is reproduced in full. Several photos, but no index (the book could use one).
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Epic Records
Records
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Mem Company
Mem Company
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Playboy
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Ymm Slacks.
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Playboy
Playboy House
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article
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Reader QA
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The Playboy Advisor
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[Q] I've been having a squabble with a young lady whom I have been seeing regularly (though we are not engaged) for the past six months. When friends invite us to a cocktail party, she insists it's my solemn duty to stick by her side the entire evening. She yelps if I so much as wander off for a minute and all hell breaks loose if I should speak to another girl when she's not around. I say she has holes in her head, that the whole raison d'etre of a party is to get people to mix as much as possible and to make new acquaintances. Who's right, the lady or I? – T. J., Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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article
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Feature
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The Book of Tony
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Ken Purdy
The thing you had to Remember about Tony Lintner was that he had a lot of foresight. He was a planner. I'd always noticed that about him. I remember driving with him on upper Madison Avenue in New York about two o'clock one morning and when we came to a red light he put the car into reverse and left it there until the light changed. I asked, how come?
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article
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Cartoon
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Cartoon
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E. Simms Campbell
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Cartoon
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Comic Strip
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Claire
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article
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Let Joy Be Confined
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James Dunning
Listen, Fellows, the Situation is Desperate, and we've got to do something about it. We are being conned out of our most precious possession: sex. We are being taken to the cleaners.
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pictorial
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Pictorial
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Playboy's Fall and Winter Fashion Forecast
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Robert L. Green
Men who pride themselves on being trend-setters in the fashion field will find this fashion forecast – the first of what will be a semi-annual playboy report – a valuable guide to the garb they'll be eager to own in the months ahead. Customarily, our fashion coverage concerns itself with specific elements of your wardrobe. Here, we're surveying the entire fashion field to provide you with an authoritative view of duds you'll want to be on the watch for, style directions that will be in the vanguard through the end of winter, (Next April, we'll present our advance word on spring and summer attire.)
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article
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Feature
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The Supermen
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William M. Clark
George summers was late in closinc up. The Friday-night footfalls of the trading farmers had died away while he wiped the counter in his small lunchroom. It was a soft night with a small mist and his motion was not hurried as he started for the door to snap the latch before his final act of cashing up.
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article
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Feature
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What's in a Name?
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[no value]
Leonard Lyons
In the Brandy and-Cigar Glow following the Churchills' golden wedding anniversary, one of Sir Winston's friends reflected on this singular fact: there was a period during his adult life when, in America, the correct answer to the question "Who is Winston Churchill?" would have been "The author of The Crisis and Richard Carvel," rather than the writer-politician who was to become one of the most illustrious men of his time.
200050_19601001_004448.xml
article
61
61
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Vargar
[no value]
200050_19601001_004449.xml
article
62
62
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
[no value]
200050_19601001_004450.xml
article
63
63
Humor
[no value]
How Not to Write a Bestseller
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Larry Siegel
As one of America's most prolific authors of books, I have had my share of creative woes through the years, my primary one being that I've never been published. This is something I cannot understand. I read every bestseller assiduously, and I'm certain that I have learned to recognize the exact ingredients that go into a book-club selection. But somehow, somewhere along the line something seems to go wrong. Recently at my request, one publisher was good enough to return my last half-dozen manuscripts, marking off the exaot spot in each where, for one reason or another, he just stopped .reading. With the fervent hope that I can whet the appetites of other publishers, or at the very least receive a kindly word of advice from authors more successful than myself, I reprint here the aforementioned manuscripts, in their entirety, as of, and up to the critical breaking-off point.
200050_19601001_004451.xml
article
65
65
Cartoon
[no value]
Encounter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jules Feiffer
Gibble Gabble Gibble Gabble Gibble Gabble
200050_19601001_004452.xml
article
66
66
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E.Simms Campbell
[no value]
200050_19601001_004453.xml
pictorial
67
67,68-70,71
Playmate
[no value]
Kathy Douglas, Miss October, 1960
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Mario Casilli
When Autumn turns the Leaves to Gold, there are few sights more stimulating than that of a lovely girl framed by nature's glories. Eighteen-year-old Kathy Douglas is such a girl. She is, in fact, one of that delightful number, The Girls of Hollywood, talked about in the pages up ahead. She divides her time more or less equally between acting assignments (she's under contract to a major studio) and the riding of a favored and favorite mount along seldom-trod California trails. When she is not accompanied on these excursions by a suitably nature-loving male, Kathy often packs along a book – not the usual sticky novel but a volume of Bulfinch, since she digs mythology: an odd enthusiasm, perhaps, for a modern chick, but not for a latter-day wood nymph attuned so acutely to the autumnal symphony that she is a natural (in all senses of the word) Miss October.
200050_19601001_004454.xml
article
72
72
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Science is making so many strides ahead, almost daily, that it gets increasingly difficult for the layman to keep up. Latest invention we've heard about is a toothpaste with built-in food particles, for people who can't eat between every brushing.
200050_19601001_004455.xml
article
73
73
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Erich Sokol
[no value]
200050_19601001_004456.xml
article
74
74,75,76,135,136
Feature
[no value]
Hunting for the Urban Man
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles O. Puffer
It wasn't long ago that the urban Nimrod who wished to indulge in his favorite sport of upland game or duck shooting was confronted with alternatives, neither of which was entirely happy. Either he had to content himself with nearby skeet and trap shooting, or he had to pack gear and duffel for an extended trip into the wilds – with the unhappy prospect of roughing it, getting up at pre-dawn to sit through a blizzard in a duckforsaken duck blind, pretending he was enjoying the wet, cold hours of waiting for a shot, and generally disrupting his life (and taking a good bit of his time) in order to experience the thrills of the sport.
200050_19601001_004457.xml
article
77
77
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Al Stine
[no value]
200050_19601001_004458.xml
article
79
79,82,118,120,121
Fiction
[no value]
A Foot in the Door
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bruce Jay Friedman
When he was Thirty-four years old and about to buy a house in Short Hills, Mr. Gordon found out he could get anything he wanted in life from an insurance agent named Merz. Merz specialized in small, cheap policies, thousand-dollar endowments, and put his feet in your door. Mr. Gordon had succeeded in putting Merz off and one night shouted at him, "I don't like people who put their feet in doors. That's no way to sell me."
200050_19601001_004459.xml
article
80
80,81
Cartoon
[no value]
A Dog's Eye View of a Party
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19601001_004460.xml
review
83
83,84,132,133
Review
[no value]
The Pleasures of Pasta
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Thomas Mario
Zitoni is the word for a certain kind of pasta, but that Italian word also means "bachelors." And zitoni is only one variety of pasta available to the questing bachelor chef:
200050_19601001_004461.xml
article
85
85,86,87,88,89,90
Poem
[no value]
Six New Poems and a Parable
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Sandburg
Skyscrapers Stand Proud
200050_19601001_004462.xml
article
91
91
Feature
[no value]
Take Pen in Hand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George Clayton Johnson
Though it is still sold in most department and drug stores for prices ranging from a modest fifty cents to a staggering {250, the fountain pen has been replaced as a common writing instrument by the ubiquitous ballpoint.
200050_19601001_004463.xml
article
92
92,93
Cartoon
[no value]
The Character Actor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shel Silverstein
[no value]
200050_19601001_004464.xml
pictorial
94
94,95,96,97,98,99,100,101,108
Pictorial
[no value]
The Girls of Hollywood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Like A Giant, Mystic Magnet projecting its lines of force over the earth, that sun-kissed strip of California coast known as Hollywood draws unto itself the most beautiful girls in the world. The statement is a cliche1; it has become so because it is simple truth. The resultant concentration of pulchritude is unmatched, anywhere, in terms of quality, variety and sheer number – and in the ratio of girls to men, which is a gratifying three to one.
200050_19601001_004465.xml
article
102
102,103,104,106
Reader Poll
[no value]
The 1961 Playboy Jazz Poll
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Leader(Please check one.)
200050_19601001_004466.xml
article
105
105
Cartoon
[no value]
Comic Strip
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alain
[no value]
200050_19601001_004467.xml
article
107
107
Ribald Classics
[no value]
Ribald Classic: Seeing is Believing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In a Certain Village in India lived a carpenter whose wife, so neighbors said, was unfaithful. This preyed upon the carpenter's mind and he asked himself constantly, "How can I prove this thing, or disprove it, as the case may be?"
200050_19601001_004468.xml
pictorial
109
109,110,111,112,113,114,115,117
Pictorial
[no value]
The Second City
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nightly, on Chicago's near north side, in a richly dark and curtained room – which partakes of the qualities of coffeehouse, nightclub and show lounge – a wildly enthusiastic audience gathers to watch a talented group of young performers who have brought the arts of the revue and of lightning improvisation to a uniquely high level of hilarious fun mixed with biting social commentary. This is The Second City – so named in wry rebuttal of A. J. Liebling's New Yorker attack on Chicago a few years back. In a short ten months the club has gained a national reputation for presenting the best satire to be seen in the U.S.A. today, taking Liebling's label and blowing it right back at him.
200050_19601001_004469.xml
advertisement
114
114,115
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Adler Company, Dept.
Shocks
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004470.xml
article
116
116
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chuck Miller
[no value]
200050_19601001_004471.xml
advertisement
117
117
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Woolrich Woolen Mills
Woorich Woolen Mills
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004472.xml
advertisement
119
119
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Jazz
Book
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004473.xml
advertisement
120
120
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sony
Record
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004474.xml
article
121
121
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shel Silverstein
[no value]
200050_19601001_004475.xml
advertisement
123
123
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Heath Company
Heath
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004476.xml
article
125
125
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahon Wilson
[no value]
200050_19601001_004477.xml
article
128
128
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Wilford-Smith
[no value]
200050_19601001_004478.xml
article
130
130
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Holley
[no value]
200050_19601001_004479.xml
advertisement
131
131
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
California Sportwear Co.
Sportwear
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004480.xml
advertisement
132
132
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004481.xml
advertisement
133
133
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rainfair, Inc.
Rainfair
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004482.xml
advertisement
133
133
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chantre
Chantre
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004483.xml
article
134
134
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Howard Shoemaker
[no value]
200050_19601001_004484.xml
advertisement
135
135
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richman Brothers
Richmans
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004485.xml
advertisement
136
136
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. Siegfried & Sons, Inc.
Masterbilt
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004486.xml
advertisement
137
137
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S.H. Arnolt Inc.
Car
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004487.xml
advertisement
137
137
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Green Bay Clothing Mfr's. Inc.
North Trail
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004488.xml
article
138
138
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Alden Erikson
[no value]
200050_19601001_004489.xml
advertisement
139
139
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
McCormick Distilling Co.
McCormick
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004490.xml
article
140
140
News
[no value]
Playboy's International Datebook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Patrick Chase
Take Your Christmas Cheer this year at an English country inn, a nifty spot for reliving Dickensian days without forsaking modern comforts. Drive down from London in the crisp, clear afternoon of Christmas Eve – perhaps to The Swan at Bibury, Gloucestershire, or The Cock Inn, at Harpenden in Hertfordshire – and enter through a holly-sprigged door into a dark-paneled taproom aglow with firelight and warm welcome. There'll be a groaning board awaiting your pleasure, visiting carolers from the village, mulled ale, and dancing in the parlor after dinner. Stay with the festivities until the day after Christmas – Boxing Day, it's called – when servants and tradesmen are given their annual tips, or "Christmas boxes." That's when the local Hunt traditionally meets to pursue reynard – all red coats and black caps, gleaming horses and spotted hounds – first crowding into the inn's courtyard for a stirrup cup before turning away to the sound of the horn and dashing across fields and hedges. Overseas visitors are often welcome to ride with the members, and there's nothing quite like it for pure exhilaration. Get the innkeeper to phone the Hunt Secretary for you.
200050_19601001_004491.xml
article
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Next Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Acapulco – Playboy on the Town South of the Border
200050_19601001_004492.xml
advertisement
C3
C3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H.i.s Sportswear
His Sportswear
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004493.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
McGregor-Doniger Inc.
McGregor
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004494.xml
advertisement
140
140
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Reader Service
Playboy Reader Service
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19601001_004495.xml