Issue: 19600701

Friday, July 1, 1960
000079
July
7
True
7
Friday, July 11, 2014
8/4/2016 12:47:51 AM

Articles
cover
C1
C1
Cover
[no value]
Cover Description
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[The following text appears on the cover]
200050_19600701_004108.xml
advertisement
C2
C2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. A. Taylor & Company
Booth's Gin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004109.xml
article
1
1
From the Editor
[no value]
Playbill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Summer is smartly signalized in this July issue of America's foremost livin'-is-easy magazine: cartoonist Gahan Wilson proffers a set of sandy sketches which we've titled, appropriately enough, On the Beach with Gahan Wilson; our various editorial service departments suggest electronic gadgetry for beach fun, clue us in on the latest fashion news in seersucker, and provide recipes for a trio of frosty summer drinks; lenslady Bunny Yeager offers a new and appealing idea in cool female fashion, done up by stage/dress-designer Jack Hakman for this month's photo feature, The Nude Look.
200050_19600701_004110.xml
advertisement
2
2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chesebrough-Pond's Inc.
Vaseline
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004111.xml
advertisement
3
3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lanvin
Lanvin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004112.xml
article
3
3,4,6
Letters to the Editor
[no value]
Dear Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Address Playboy Magazine
200050_19600701_004113.xml
other
3
3
Indicia
[no value]
Indicia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy, July, 1960, vol. 7, No. 7. Published Monthly by HMH Publishing Co., Inc., Playboy Building, 232 E. Ohio st., Chicago 11, Ill. second class postage paid at Chicago. Illinois. Printed in U.S.A. Contents copyrighted © 1960 by HMH publishing Co., INC., Subscriptions: In the D.S., Its Possessions. The pan American union and canada. $14 for three years, $11 for two years, $6 for one year. Elsewhere add $3 per year for foreign postage. Allow 30 days for new Subscriptions and renewals change of address: send both old and new address and allow 30 days for change. Advertising: Howard W. Lederer, advertising director, 720 Fifth avenue, New york 19, New york, cl 5-2620: Advertising production, playboy building, 232 east ohio street. Chicago 11. Illinois. Ml 2-1000: Los Angeles Representative, Blanchard-Nichols Associates, 633 S. Westmoreland Ave., Los Angeles S. Calif., DU 8-6134: San Francisco Representative, Blanchard-Nichols Associates, Phillips and Van Orden Bldg., 900 3rd st., San Francisco 7, Calif., yu 6-6341: Southeastern Representative, Southeast Advertising Sales, chamber of Commerce Bldg., Miami, Fla., Fr 1-2103.
200050_19600701_004114.xml
advertisement
4
4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jules Berman & Associates, Inc.
Kahlúa
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004115.xml
advertisement
5
5
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
International Collector's Library
International Collector's Library
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004116.xml
advertisement
6
6
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Pro Electric
Pro Electric
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004117.xml
review
7
7
Review
[no value]
Playboy After Hours
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Inflation, a clear and present danger on the economic level, is quickly becoming more and more of a devaluating influence on our everyday language as well. We refer specifically to the growing trend toward making jobs seem what they are not by giving them pompous titles. Thus, janitors have become "superintendents" and "maintenance engineers"; cab drivers are officially known as "public chauffeurs" and truck drivers want to be known as "van operators"; buyers have become "purchasing agents" or even "procurement specialists"; official title of the man who picks up papers in the park is "landscape engineer"; garbage collectors are "sanitation engineers" and garbage cans are "refuse disposal containers." The Wisconsin Restaurant Association feels that the term "beverage host" should replace "bartender" because the former title "has more dignity." If the trend continues, where will it all end? Will elevator operators become Ascendant and Descendant Pilots? Will tailors shortly be known as Stitch Engineers? Are house painters to be called Exterior Decorators? Will you get your haircut from a Tress Sculptor? Will you have your mail delivered by a Communications Expediter, your windows washed by an Aperture Renovator, your laundry picked up by a Clothing Immaculator, your doors opened by an Entrance Traffic Coordinator? Just as the dollar is losing more and more of its value, so are our titles becoming more and more meaningless, which is especially ironic when we remember that the holder of the really top position has always had to be satisfied with the shortest job title: God.
200050_19600701_004118.xml
review
7
7,10
Review
[no value]
Acts and Entertainments
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
It's our notion, in this new department, to apprise you from time to time of those acts and entertainments we think you should look for – or look out for – when they're on tap at your favorite night spot. Bob Newhart – the new comic who broke up audiences during his stay at Mister Kelly's in Chicago – strikes us as a happy nominee for inaugural honors. He's a thirty-year-old satirist who dodged show biz as a full-time venture until early this year, when glowing response to his appearance on Playboy's Penthouse inspired him to hit the night club circuit. Newhart, who writes all his own stuff, may remind some of Shelley Berman, who also got his start at Kelly's less than three years ago and is now the most successful of all the new hip school of comics. Coming on as captain of the atomic sub U.S.S. Codfish, Newhart lectures his crew on their arrival home after two years of underwater endurance: "Men, we hold the record for the most Japanese tonnage sunk ... unfortunately, they were sunk in 1954." As a television director putting the Khrushchev landing rehearsal through its paces, an anxious Newhart shrieks, "Somebody cue Ike. Have somebody take the putter from Ike." But it is as a PR man, holding a phone conversation with Abe Lincoln just before Gettysburg, that Newhart broke us into the smallest of pieces:
200050_19600701_004119.xml
advertisement
8
8,9
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The RCA Victor Popular Album Club
RCA Victor Popular Album
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004120.xml
advertisement
10
10
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Trend
Trend
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004121.xml
advertisement
10
10
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S.H. Arnolt, Inc.
S.H. Arnolt
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004122.xml
review
10
10,12
Review-Films
[no value]
Films
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The big comedy news for most of the summer is I'm All Right, Jack. This British film itself is that rare thing, a comedy with real content and profound morality; so it is all the more thrilling to report that it is hilariously funny. Ian Carmichael plays a pleasant, wealthy, well-educated but none too bright joker whose main trouble in life is that he sincerely wants to perform meaningful work. In his quest for this he encounters a lot of shrewdies for whom the concept of a decent day's work is something to fight against (Labor), and fewer but filthier types for whom even the peace of the world doesn't stand a chance against the hope of turning a fast buck (Management). Alone, in the middle, is our dim-witted hero, working away for perhaps the ultimate agency of social welfare and doom, something called Missiles, Ltd. Through an excess of energy and good will, Carmichael demonstrates to a snooping time-study monster how fast he can work; this results in a strike called by steward Peter Sellers, this time out a glassy-eyed, pathetic-absurd Cockney who loves all things Russian. The strike spreads, finally endangering a big arms deal cooked up by Missiles' elegant board chairman, Dennis Price, and a shifty-eyed Arab – all in the interest of "keeping the peace in the Middle East." With a big assist from the conservative press, Carmichael becomes a national hero. But since no one wants the strike to continue, or to look very long or hard at the moral bankruptcy its opposing forces represent, a deal between them is engineered and it's business as usual again. The grim but very amusing ending has Carmichael finding sanctuary in a nudist colony well-stocked with girls well-stacked.
200050_19600701_004123.xml
advertisement
11
11
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The British Motor Corporation, Ltd.
MG
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004124.xml
advertisement
12
12
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Heath Company
Healthkit
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004125.xml
review
12
12,13,14
Review-Books
[no value]
Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sterling C. Quinlan, TV exec who last year produced a book titled The Merger – a behind-the-scenes business novel – now comes along with a completely different, and considerably better, effort: a robustious, sometimes rowdy, always lusty and yeasty story centering about an applejack-swigging picaroaptly named Jugger (McDowell, Obolensky, $3.95). Jugger is the town drunk of Crater Village, a bucolic community not too far from New York City and pretty clearly modeled on Greenwood Lake, a lovely-to-look-upon resort community which was the mis en scène of the most famous fictional murder in American literature, Dreiser's An American Tragedy. Quinlan's tale is something very different: his concern is with the raucus fun he extracts from the antics of the natives in their effort to commit Jugger to the poor farm (so he won't freeze to death over the winter, they say, but actually to put a stop to his cheerful and remorseless pilferage of whatever he needs to keep his tattered body and wild free soul together). All Jugger wants is to be left alone – which is exactly what the town characters (and they are, indeed, characters) don't want to do – including his mentor, Carrot Woman, who fancies her sexy self as Jugger's one-man war on respectability, he rises (in his own outrageous way) to the needs of a pair of twin waifs even more outcasts than he, and achieves a kind of cockeyed heroism after all. It's a shrewd guess that underneath his ebullient excursion is the author's profound conviction that irreverent iconoclasm is exactly what the world needs more of – his comedic, roundabout rural route to the statement notwithstanding.
200050_19600701_004126.xml
advertisement
12
12
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sands
Sands
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004127.xml
advertisement
13
13
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nissan Motor Company, Ltd.
Datsun
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004128.xml
advertisement
14
14
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Margie Douglas
Margie Douglas
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004129.xml
advertisement
14
14
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Schieffelin & Co.
Dagger
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004130.xml
review
14
14,15
Review-Recorded Music
[no value]
Recordings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
We wager it was a wild night in Hollywood when Warner's recording crew turned on the trusty Ampex to capture The Mary Kaye Trio on the Sunset Strip (Warner Bros.). It's a ball. Mary Kaye, her brother Norman and anchor man Frank Ross cavort madly, turning such standards as How Did He Look? and You've Changed into the sort of bluish stuff the airwaves aren't made for. There are hard-charging excursions, too, as the trio wallops its way through Toreador and Circus. Whether it wanders insanely or plays it straight, this is an attention-holding group. And Mary Kaye can effortlessly shame most of today's sugary pop shouters. Buddy Greco, who leads his hip trio on the supperclub and lounge circuit, is one of the better singer-pianists on the jazz fringe. In My Buddy (Epic), recorded at Chicago's Le Bistro, he sighs and surges his way through eleven tunes, from a pulsating Like Young to a tender Misty to a rousing Cheek to Cheek. The audience digs. You will, too. The clerk at your record shop might have trouble finding The Gasser (World Pacific) because of the variety of monickers it goes under. On the front cover: A Singer – Annie Ross/ A Swinger – Zoot Sims/ A Gasser! On the back cover: A Gasser/ Annie Ross/ Featuring Zoot Sims and Runs Freeman. On the spine: A Gasser. No matter. Make him stick to his task. Annie (sans Lambert & Hendricks) has never sounded better to our ears, wisely chooses a raft of not-often-heard goodies like I Didn't Know About You and Invitation to the Blues. In the background wail the gassers and swingers, and the result is sheer ear balm.
200050_19600701_004131.xml
review
14
14
Review-Theatre
[no value]
Theatre
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bye Bye Birdie is a wild and kookie musical about rock-'n'-rolling teenagers, but it has their elders dancing in the aisles. The titular hero of this joyous whoopdedo is Conrad Birdie, a hulking, hip-grinding crooner played by Dick Gautier with pelvic apologies to Elvis. When Birdie, like Presley, is drafted into the armed forces, his manager, Dick Van Dyke, plans a final publicity campaign to be staged in the town of Sweet Apple, Ohio. What happens to the sleepy town of Sweet Apple when the idolized sexpot steps off the train was made to order for the talents of Gower Champion. Doubling as the show's director and choreographer, Champion is at his best when he crowds his stage with an army of screaming. flipping Birdie-watchers, or matches the teenage tumult with a series of whirlwind comic ballets for the indefatigable Chita Rivera. Book is by Michael Stewart, the Charles Strouse – Lee Adams score sings nicely along the way, and Paul Lynde and Kay Medford have never been as funny before in their talented lives. Gower, however, is the real champion of the enlivening evening. At the Martin Beck, West 45th Street, NYC.
200050_19600701_004132.xml
advertisement
15
15
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Beaunit Mills, Inc.
Reis
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004133.xml
advertisement
16
16
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. Lorillard Co.
Old Gold
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004134.xml
masthead
17
17
Copyright
[no value]
Address_Copyright_Credit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no creator]
General Offices, Playboy Building, 232 E. Ohio Street, Chicago 11, Illinois. Return Postage must Accompany all Manuscripts, Drawings and Photographs Submitted if they are to be Returned and no Responsibility can be Assumed for Unsolicited Materials. Contents Copyrighted © 1960 by HMH Publishing Co., Inc. Nothing may be Reprinted in Whole or in Part Without Written Permission from the Publisher. Any Similarity between the People and Places in the Fiction and Semi-Fiction in this Magazine and any Real People and Places is Purely Coincidental, Credits: Cover design by Arthur Paul, Photograph by Mario Casilli; P. 32-33 Photograph by Playboy Studio; P. 36 Photograph by Don Bronstein, Playboy Studio; P. 49 Photograph by Playboy Studio; P. 53 Photographs by Playboy Studio and Jerry Yulsman; P. 58-61 Photographs by Dave Sutton, Earl Leaf and Southern California ASMP.
200050_19600701_004135.xml
masthead
17
17
Masthead
[no value]
Masthead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hugh M. Hefnereditor and publisher
200050_19600701_004136.xml
tableOfContents
17
17
Table of Contents
[no value]
Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
200050_19600701_004137.xml
article
18
18,19,20,22,30,78,79,80,81,82
Fiction
[no value]
O You New York Girls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Wallace
the adventures of a very young man in a jungle of lissome limbs
200050_19600701_004138.xml
article
21
21
Cartoon
[no value]
The Lover
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jules Feiffer
I've quit going out.What is this you've quit going out bit? How can you quit going out?
200050_19600701_004139.xml
pictorial
23
23,24,25,26,27
Pictorial
[no value]
The Nude Look
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
<i>our answer to the foolish feminine fashions of the day</i>
200050_19600701_004140.xml
article
28
28,29
Feature
[no value]
A Guide for Guys on the Steering Committee on when to Wave, Wave Back or Waver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard G. Gould
In 1939 there were probably not a hundred sports cars in the United States, so the problem was a simple one: when two drivers chanced to meet on the road, they exchanged brisk waves, perhaps accompanied by dignified bows (from the neck only). Even ten years later, with the sports-car count in the thousands and rising fast, one would not, except in Westchester County, Westport, Evanston and Greater Los Angeles, expect to meet so many sports-car brethren that greeting them would be much of an effort. But even then it was clear that some kind of pecking order was needed. Every once in a while an ugly little impasse was noted: the driver of a Stutz Bearcat waiting just too long before waving to a chap in an Alfa-Romeo 1750, for example.
200050_19600701_004141.xml
article
31
31,66,85
Fiction
[no value]
First Anniversary
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Matheson
there was only one thing wrong with norman's lovely wife
200050_19600701_004142.xml
article
33
32,33
Feature
[no value]
Fresh Ideas for Frosty Coolers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
three piquant potations for slaking summer thirst
200050_19600701_004143.xml
article
34
34,38,48,83,84
Feature
[no value]
Rocket to the Enaissance
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur C. Clarke
man's hope for cultural vitality lies beyond the earth
200050_19600701_004144.xml
article
35
35
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Erich Sokol
[no value]
200050_19600701_004145.xml
article
36
36,37
Feature
[no value]
Seersucker Circa 60
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert L. Green
A fine old fabric, now in a variety of fresh patterns
200050_19600701_004146.xml
article
39
39
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bev (Bev Kennedy)
[no value]
200050_19600701_004147.xml
article
40
40
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19600701_004148.xml
pictorial
41
41,42-44,45
Pictorial
[no value]
Ship Shape
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Miss July enjoys life on the briny deep
200050_19600701_004149.xml
article
46
46
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
We find ourself in complete accord with the etiquette expert who says that only well-reared girls should wear slacks.
200050_19600701_004150.xml
article
47
47
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19600701_004151.xml
article
49
49
Feature
[no value]
You can take it with you
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
for that extra fillip of fun out of doors – portable, plugless gadgets
200050_19600701_004152.xml
article
50
50
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Al Stine
[no value]
200050_19600701_004153.xml
article
51
51,52,62,76,77
Fiction
[no value]
Wilbur Fonts for President
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jeremy Dole
a congressman at large in gamy gay paree
200050_19600701_004154.xml
article
53
53
Profile
[no value]
Ornette Coleman: beyond the dreams of adolphe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jazz and Symphony Titan Leonard Bernstein flipped over the sounds coming from the strange-looking plastic instrument, leaped onto the bandstand of New York's Five Spot to better dig them, then invited their creator to Carnegie Hall. That creator was Ornette Coleman, thirty, gentle and retiring as a Trappist, who has but one seemingly simple goal: to successfully emulate the warmth and fluidity of the human voice on his alto sax. Shelly Manne says Coleman's already achieved it: "Sounds like someone crying or laughing when he plays." Others have said: "Coleman is making a unique and valuable contribution to 'tomorrow's' music" (Nat Hentoff); "the only really new thing in jazz since the innovations [of Bird and Diz] in the mid-Forties" (pianist John Lewis); "wild sounds that Adolphe Sax never dreamed of" (Whitney Balliett); and – representing the opposition – "structureless, meandering" (John S. Wilson). Coleman's recent success comes after several shapeless years in L.A., was precipitated by a couple of far-out, talked-about LPs (Tomorrow Is the Question, The Shape of Jazz to Come). Why, ask some, is Coleman preoccupied with this human voice kick? Shyly, haltingly, he tries to tell you: "Music is – is for our feelings." Controversial Coleman has had his plastic sax smashed by a New Orleans audience that didn't cotton to his sounds. Of that odd sax, he explains: "I needed a new horn and couldn't afford a brass one. Better a cheap horn than an old horn that leaks, y'know? But after living with this plastic one here, it's begun to take on my emotions. The tone seems breathier than brass, but I like it. More human."
200050_19600701_004155.xml
article
53
53
Profile
[no value]
Earl Blackwell: who's who and where
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
What's brigitte bardot's home address? This burning question can be answered by leafing to page 52 of the new 864-page, five-pound, $26 Celebrity Register, a brisk though bulky book that provides lively biographies, photos and inside information on 2240 famous and infamous, national and international figures – from Hank Aaron to Vera Zorina. The key force in conceiving and assembling Celebrity Register (upper-crust expert Cleveland Amory served as editor-in-chief) was publisher Earl Black-well, a dapper forty-seven-year-old bachelor who has constructed a formidable $500,000-a-year empire – Celebrity Service – out of an energetic interest in the doings of the well-to-do and do-it-wells. With the aid of a harried staff, packed file cabinets and a battery of phones in New York, Hollywood, London, Paris and Rome, Blackwell keeps his subscription-only clients (radio-TV execs, columnists and the like) posted on the doings of more than 100,000 big names. He does so in his Celebrity Bulletin, a collection of one-liners on big-doers issued five days a week; his Social Calendar, a monthly listing of important openings and parties; his Theatrical Calendar, a weekly dopesheet on New York stage happenings, and his annual Contact Book, which is just that. Black-well spends much of his time meeting, escorting, dining with and informally interviewing members of the news-making set, loves every minute of it, hopes to revise and issue Celebrity Register each year "if everybody is as celebrity struck as I am." It looks like they are.
200050_19600701_004156.xml
article
54
54,55
Cartoon
[no value]
The Quiet Man
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Silverstein
[no value]
200050_19600701_004157.xml
article
56
56
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Reamer Keller
[no value]
200050_19600701_004158.xml
article
57
57,75
Feature
[no value]
I Only Want a Sweetheart, not a Buddy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
William Iversen
a lament for the passing of an american institution: the all-girl girl
200050_19600701_004159.xml
pictorial
59
58,59,60,61
Pictorial
[no value]
Photographers & Models Ball
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
hollywood's shutter set tosses its own style playboy party
200050_19600701_004160.xml
article
63
63
Feature
[no value]
Ourselves to Know Too Well
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don Gold
try the view from john o'hara's terrace
200050_19600701_004161.xml
article
64
64,65
Cartoon
[no value]
On the Beach
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gahan Wilson
sandy smiles from our seer of the strange and inexplicable
200050_19600701_004162.xml
article
67
67,68,70,74
Feature
[no value]
Luck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T.K. Brown III
what it is, what it's not—and how to separate fact from fable
200050_19600701_004163.xml
article
69
69
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gardner Rea
[no value]
200050_19600701_004164.xml
pictorial
71
71,72,73
Pictorial
[no value]
Still more Teevee Jeebies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shel Silverstein
do-it-yourself subtitles for the midnight movies
200050_19600701_004165.xml
advertisement
74
74
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brilliant Bros. Co.
Thomas
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004166.xml
advertisement
74
74
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
New Inventions Co.
New Inventions
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004167.xml
advertisement
75
75
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kramer
Flight Bag
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004168.xml
advertisement
75
75
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sawyer's
Sawyer's
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004169.xml
article
76
76
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Interlandi
[no value]
200050_19600701_004170.xml
advertisement
77
77
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lanai-
Sportswear
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004171.xml
article
81
81
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19600701_004172.xml
advertisement
83
83
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The House of Menna
Menna
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004173.xml
article
85
85
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. Mayer
[no value]
200050_19600701_004174.xml
advertisement
86
86
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy Reader Service
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004175.xml
article
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
Next Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Playboy Key Club–All About the Magazine's Own Private Drinking Club and How you Can Join
200050_19600701_004176.xml
article
86
86
Feature
[no value]
Playboy's International Datebook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Patrick Chase
Fall – Like, for Instance, September – is when a lot of sensible chaps take their vacations. The pressure's off most everywhere – trains, planes, restaurants and hotels – and fewer rubbernecks spell better service for you no matter where you head. Kiddies are out of sight, too, back in schools where they belong. Prices plummet to near normal and fall foliage, if you're in a part of the world with four seasons, adds its special zest to the countryside.
200050_19600701_004177.xml
advertisement
C3
C3
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Columbia Record Club
Columbia
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004178.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Renault, Inc.
Renault
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19600701_004179.xml