Issue: 19570401

Monday, April 1, 1957
000040
April
4
True
4
Friday, July 11, 2014
8/4/2016 12:49:59 AM

Articles
cover
C1
C1
Cover
[no value]
Cover Description
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[The following text appears on the cover]
200050_19570401_001511.xml
advertisement
2
2
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. Stein & Company
Belt
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001512.xml
article
3
3
From the Editor
[no value]
Playbill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Algren, Spectorsky, Purdy: each of these fellows is the acknowledged nonpareil in his sphere, and each has contributed something choice to this April issue of Playboy. Nelson Algren, passionate poet laureate of the seamy side of urban life (The Man with the Golden Arm; The Neon Wilderness), gives us his first new work of fiction since the best-selling novel, A Walk on the Wild Side -- you'll find All Through the Night a piece of powerful, eminently Algrenesque prose. Our Associate Publisher, A. C. Spectorsky, is the undisputed expert on Exurbia (a word he coined in his book, The Exurbanites, and which is being included in the new Thorndike-Barnhart dictionary). Of all the many fascinating aspects of Exurbia, its playful moments are of particular interest to Playboy readers, we feel, and so Exurbanites at Play graces these pages, illustrated especially for Playboy by Robert Osborn. Eastern Editor Ken Purdy, ex-skipper of both True and Argosy, and, incidentally, the country's foremost sports cars writer, rounds out the authoritative triumvirate. He has assembled The Compleat Sports Car Stable for us, with handsome, full-color photographs by Philip O. Stearns.
200050_19570401_001513.xml
advertisement
4
4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hiram Walker & Sons Inc.
Imperial
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001514.xml
advertisement
5
5
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lanvin
Lanvin
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001515.xml
article
5
5,6
Letters to the Editor
[no value]
Dear Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Address Playboy Magazine • 232 E. Ohio St., Chicago 11, Illinois
200050_19570401_001516.xml
other
5
5
Indicia
[no value]
Indicia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy, April, 1957, Vol. 4, No. 4. Published Monthly by HMH Publishing Co., Inc., Playboy Building, 232 E. Ohio Street, Chicago 11, Illinois. Entered as second class matter August 5, 1955 at the Post Office at Chicago, Illinois, Under the Act of March 3, 1879. Printed in U.S.A. Contents Copyrighted © 1957 by HMH Publishing Co., Inc. Subscriptions: In the U.S., its possessions, The Pan-American Union and Canada, $13 for three years, $10 for two years, $6 for one year; elsewhere add $3 per year for foreign postage. Please allow 30 days for entering new subscriptions and renewals. Change of address: Send both old and new addresses and allow 30 days for change to become effective. Advertising: Main Advertising Office, Howard Lederer, Eastern Manager, 598 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y., Plaza 9-7470; Western Advertising Office, Edward Howard, Western Manager, 232 E. Ohio Street, Chicago 11, Illinois, Michigan 2-1000; Los Angeles Representative, Fred E. Crawford, 612 S. Serrano Avenue, Los Angeles 5, California, Dunkirk 4-7352; San Francisco Representative, A. S. Babcock, 605 Market Street, San Francisco 5, California.
200050_19570401_001517.xml
advertisement
7
7
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Columbia Record Club
Columbia
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001518.xml
advertisement
8
8
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Marlboro
Marlboro
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001519.xml
review
9
9
Review
[no value]
Playboy After Hours
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Question: how does an author dream up a title for his new book? Answer: he usually doesn't. Instead, he excerpts some hoary quote from a nearby Bartlett's and affixes it to his tome. Thus, we have had in the past such lifted, and uplifting, book monickers as For Whom the Bell Tolls and The Grapes of Wrath, among several thousand others. We think we've spotted a fresh titling trend among contemporary authors: to ignore the classical quotes and dip instead into the wellspring (or cesspool) of earthy epithets we all know and love, employing only the spotless half of the phrase, of course. Witness on your bookseller's shelves such current handles as Grab Your Socks and Without a Paddle. It is with unabashed charity and good-will that we offer to budding bowdlerizers and wits-end word wielders everywhere free access to the following list of thoroughly original, polished-up philippics: In Your Hat, At the Moon, Up a Rope, From Shinola, A Hole in the Ground, Off a Brass Monkey, In a Sling, With a Blowtorch, On a Shingle, A Rubber Duck, In an Uproar or Hit the Fan.
200050_19570401_001520.xml
review
9
9,10
Review-Theatre
[no value]
Theatre
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
By a stroke of inspired casting, two of the most talented clowns on tap are teamed to make Gore Vidal's Visit To A Small Planet worth at least one or two visits to the Booth Theatre, 222 West 45th Street. Dressed in top hat and frock coat, Cyril Ritchard arrives from outer space in his sports model flying saucer, enchanted at the prospect of observing our violent Earth people at close quarters. Like a cat stirring up trouble in a bowl of goldfish, the visitor promptly foments an all-out atomic war between the U.S. and Russia. Fortunately General Eddie Mayehoff, the well-padded butt of the Pentagon and the chief of the Army's Laundry Division, is assigned to defend our planet's right to clean sheets, red tape and the pursuit of idiocy. The sparring between the space man and the General is a classic contest between two contrasting comedy styles, each of them perfect in its own fashion. Directed by Ritchard, Vidal's comedy is at best a tenuous whimsy, but it clocks at a chuckle a minute when either of the two addled antagonists is cavorting on stage, which is happily much of the time.
200050_19570401_001521.xml
advertisement
10
10
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Bethlehem Records
Bethlehem
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001522.xml
review
10
10,11,12,13
Review-Books
[no value]
Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"A violent form of entertainment" is the phrase being used to promote Charles Beaumont's first collection of stories, The Hunger (Putnam, $3.50), but we doubt if such razzmatazz salesmanship is really necessary. Once dipped into, this book clamps down on you like a bear trap and doesn't let go until you've devoured all 17 yarns. Included are Black Country, in which a dead jazzman's horn is dug up for the wildest jam session ever blown; The Hunger and The Dark Music, wherein a couple of old maids are raped by a sex killer and the god Pan, respectively; and The Crooked Man, which is all about a future totalitarian society in which heterosexuals are hunted down as "queers" and brainwashed into becoming homos (these stories you'll remember from Playboy). Come to think of it, it is a pretty violent form of entertainment, at that. But good!
200050_19570401_001523.xml
advertisement
11
11
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Hudnut
Sportsman D-Bar
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001524.xml
advertisement
11
11
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001525.xml
advertisement
12
12
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jimmy Durante
Dance Program
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001526.xml
advertisement
13
13
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Southern Comfort Corporation
Southern Comfort
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001527.xml
review
13
13
Review-Dining-Drinking
[no value]
Dining-Drinking
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Traditional jazz -- relaxed and rollicking by turns -- is the type ladled out at San Francisco's Tin Angel (987 Embarcadero) seven nights a week from nine to two A.M. Six of those nights, the bandstand shimmies to trombonist Turk Murphy's crew, devotees all of the early Armstrong-Oliver style of sock-and-soul. On Mondays, Turk's eminent entourage takes a breather and the Bay City Jazz Band fills in, wailing out a whale of a storm that is part New Orleans, part San Francisco and part typhoon. A jazz buff's stomping ground, the Angel goes bohemian in decor with walls covered by World War I enlistment posters; a brace of nickelodeons blares Aspirin Age arias between sets; and there's a long bar constructed of ancient bricks and a centralized fireplace that puts everybody at his gentle ease. An admission charge there is, but it's only 90¢ per head -- a pittance to pay for so much fine and mellow vintage jazz.
200050_19570401_001528.xml
review
13
13,14
Review-Films
[no value]
Films
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
We're not going to tell you much about the plot of The Constant Husband, because we hate people who do that with surprise-twist films and spoil everybody else's fun. It is a tribute to the talents of the scripters (Val Valentine and Sidney Gilliat), the director (also Gilliat) and the star (Rex Harrison) that one of the most whiskery of farce situations (amnesia, etc.) has been made into a fresh, fast, funny film. With the probable exception of My Fair Lady, this is just about the best comic acting Harrison has done on stage or screen, and the secret is that he plays it straight as a die from beginning to end, the ridiculous incidents notwithstanding. No mugging, no archness, no "get this" -- he is in dead earnest throughout, and therefore killingly funny. Though ably abetted by deft, daft farceurs Cecil Parker and Robert Coote and by beauties Kay Kendall, Nicole Maurey and Margaret Leighton, this is Harrison's picture and he makes the most of it while seeming to make the least.
200050_19570401_001529.xml
advertisement
14
14
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
James B. Lansing Sound, Inc.
JBL D130
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001530.xml
review
14
14,16
Review-Recorded Music
[no value]
Records
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Drifting around Chicago's South Side (some few feet above the sidewalk) is a guy who calls himself Sun Ra. Mr. Sun (or is it Mr. Ra?) says he's an Egyptian and he writes, besides music, prophetic prose and poetic prophecy. You can sample it in the little booklet by him which comes inside the textless liner of Jazz by Sun Ra (Transition 10), and which contains, among other gone goodies: blank verse, explanations of such compositions as Brainville, Lullaby for Realville, Sun Song ("The reach for new sounds, a spacite picture of the atonal tomorrow . . ."), and a hunk of writing titled "Unremembered Dreams." It's a pleasant shock, therefore, to hear the music, which sounded to our dull ears remarkably like good, groovy earth music of the cool-and-crazy school. We'd be happy to give you additional dope on this far-out platter but we have a more pressing problem: we have to be on Saturn for dinner and Jupiter's in the way. Over and out.
200050_19570401_001531.xml
advertisement
15
15
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Radiant Manufacturing Corp.
Radiant
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001532.xml
advertisement
16
16
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Coty, Inc.
L'aimant
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001533.xml
tableOfContents
17
17
Table of Contents
[no value]
Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
200050_19570401_001534.xml
masthead
17
17
Copyright
[no value]
Address_Copyright_Credit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
General Offices, Playboy Building, 232 E. Ohio Street, Chicago 11, Illinois. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings and photographs submitted if they are to be returned and no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. Contents Copyrighted © 1957 by HMH Publishing Co., Inc. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the Publisher. Any similarity between the people and places in the fiction and semi-fiction in this magazine and any real people and places is purely coincidental. Credits: Cover--Design by Arthur Paul, Collage by B. Paul, Model Elaine Conte, Photography by Dick Boyer and Studio No. 1: Page 3 Photograph of Nelson Algren by Arthur Shay; Page 35 Photo by Studio No. 1: Pages 39-43 Photos by Hal Adams.
200050_19570401_001535.xml
masthead
17
17
Masthead
[no value]
Masthead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hugh M. Hefner editor and publisher
200050_19570401_001536.xml
article
18
18,19,20,73,74,76,77
Fiction
[no value]
The Sergeant and the Slave Girl
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T. K. Brown III
he broke every regulation the army ever made
200050_19570401_001537.xml
article
21
21,34,38,46,52,56,77
Feature
[no value]
Exurbanites at Play
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. C. Spectorsky
the jinks are higher in the outlands of gotham
200050_19570401_001538.xml
article
22
22,23,24,25,26,28
Feature
[no value]
The Compleat Sports Car Stable
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ken Purdy
here are the six you should own and why
200050_19570401_001539.xml
article
27
27
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19570401_001540.xml
article
29
29,69,70,71,72
Feature
[no value]
All Through the Night
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Nelson Algren
sleep, my love, and peace attend thee ...
200050_19570401_001541.xml
article
31
30,31,32
News
[no value]
Come Rain, Come Shine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Blake Rutherford
friends in foul weather and fair
200050_19570401_001542.xml
article
33
33
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Al Stine
[no value]
200050_19570401_001543.xml
article
35
35,36,78,79
Feature
[no value]
Shrimps Supreme
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Thomas Mario
the life and loves of the scrumptious schizopoda
200050_19570401_001544.xml
article
37
37
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jack Cole
[no value]
200050_19570401_001545.xml
pictorial
39
39,40-42,43
Pictorial
[no value]
Winsome Windsor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
a brief encounter over a counter got us a playmate for april
200050_19570401_001546.xml
article
44
44
Humor
[no value]
Playboy's Party Jokes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The outraged husband discovered his wife in bed with another man.
200050_19570401_001547.xml
article
45
45
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gardner Rea
[no value]
200050_19570401_001548.xml
article
47
47,48
Fiction
[no value]
Victory Parade
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Henry Slesar
a murmur spread through the city like the humming of angry insects
200050_19570401_001549.xml
article
49
49,50,78
Humor
[no value]
The Power of Positive Thimking
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
William Iversen
scattered brainstorms, clearing toward morning
200050_19570401_001550.xml
article
51
51
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles W. Miller
[no value]
200050_19570401_001551.xml
article
53
53,54
Book Excerpt
[no value]
The Wayward Wife
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Guy de Maupassant
One of the most sophisticated tales of the French storyteller, Guy de Maupassant
200050_19570401_001552.xml
article
55
55
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19570401_001553.xml
article
57
57,58,59,60,61,62,67,68
Feature
[no value]
Sex on Lex
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Bakal
the most pulchritude-packed palazzo in all new york
200050_19570401_001554.xml
article
63
63,66
Feature
[no value]
Hemingway
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jed Kiley
a title bout in ten rounds
200050_19570401_001555.xml
article
64
64,65
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. Loehle
[no value]
200050_19570401_001556.xml
article
67
67
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Shel Silverstein
[no value]
200050_19570401_001557.xml
article
71
71
Cartoon
[no value]
Females by Cole: 34
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Jack Cole
[no value]
200050_19570401_001558.xml
article
73
73
Cartoon
[no value]
Cartoon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Dempsey
[no value]
200050_19570401_001559.xml
advertisement
75
75
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
English dart board set No. 750
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001560.xml
review
79
79
Review
[no value]
Playboy's International Datebook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Just about everything gets going in Europe in June (including Arctic safaris for polar bear out of Tromsö, Norway, and appropriately-costumed 16th Century football in the Boboli Gardens at Florence)--but transatlantic passage by sea on the better carriers is already sold out. Even by air, it's tight now for the coming summer. One good gimmick, if you're stuck, is to buy the least expensive tour (most operators have options left on eastbound space), skip the conducted itinerary, and make your own arrangements for easier westbound space.
200050_19570401_001561.xml
advertisement
80
80
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Playboy
Playboy
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001562.xml
article
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
Next Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Al Morgan, author of The Great Man, contributes a corrosive story of Hollywood ...
200050_19570401_001563.xml
advertisement
81
81
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Swank
Saxony
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001564.xml
advertisement
C4
C4
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Winston
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_001565.xml
advertisement
80
80
Display Ad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Decisions
Decisions
[no value]
[no value]
200050_19570401_090802.xml