Issue: 19540901

Wednesday, September 1, 1954
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Friday, July 11, 2014
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Articles
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Cover Description
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[The following text appears on the cover]
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Playbill
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We don't know whether you're a cover-to-cover Playboy reader or only spend time with the special features that catch your attention each month, but on the chance that you're a part of the second group, we urge you not to skip Charles Beaumont's "Black Country" in this issue. Here is a story about jazz and about the people who play jazz, packed with all the power, emotion, and excitement of the music itself. It has been a long time since any story moved us as much as this one. Beaumont considers it the best story he has ever written and it is certainly one of the finest we've printed to date.
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Dear Playboy
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Address Playboy Magazine 11 E. Superior St., Chicago 11, Illinois
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Indicia
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Playboy is published monthly by the HMH Publishing Co., Inc., 11 E. Superior, Chicago 11, Illinois. Postage must accompany all manuscripts and drawings submitted if they are to be returned and no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. Contents copyrighted 1954 by HMH Publishing Co., Inc. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission. Printed in U.S.A. Any similarity between people and places is purely coincidental.
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Masthead
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Hugh M. Hefner, editor and publisher
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Contents for the Men's Entertainment Magazine
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Black Country--fiction .......... Charles Beaumont 6
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Black Country
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Charles Beaumont
Spoof Collins blew his brains out, all right -- right on out through the top of his head. But I don't mean with a gun. I mean with a horn. Every night: slow and easy, eight to one. And that's how he died. Climbing, with that horn, climbing up high. For what? "Hey, man, Spoof -- listen, you picked the tree, now come on down!" But he couldn't come down, he didn't know how. He just kept climbing, higher and higher. And then he fell. Or jumped. Anyhow, that's the way he died.
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Virginity
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Frankenstein Smith
All sophisticated playboys are interested in virginity. We trust that the matter of your own virginity has already been satisfactorily taken care of. You must now face up to the problem of virginity in your female friends and acquaintances.
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Satchmo Bops the Boppers!
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As the newest, most unorthodox brand of jazz, be-bop has been a both precocious and pungnacious baby. With Dizzy Gillespie as their Grand Lama, bopsters have proceeded to produce some mighty strange music. They've also given the language some new, very expressive superlatives ("crazy," cool," "the most," "the greatest," "the end"), given humor a thing called the bop joke, and the world of fashion Dizzy's own beret, goatee and bop glasses.
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Cartoon
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Cartoon
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Jack Cole
"Now that you've chosen between us, Eileen do you mind if I watch?"
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Business Meetings
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Shepherd Mead
The farmer spends his time in the fields, the laborer at his machine, and the businessman at meetings.
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Al Stine
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Hope On Golf
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Bob Hope
Early one morning last week, I was up at the crack of my back and on the links for a fast eighteen holes. Being a little nearsighted, I lost my caddy, and for over an hour followed a squaw carrying a papoose. That was the beginning of a beautiful friendship with the Cleveland Indians, but it didn't do much for my golf game.
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Steig's Embarrassed People
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William Steig
All of these drawings involve embarrassing situations as viewed by the rather abstract pen of artist William Steig. What you get from each of them will probably be as much dependent on your own experiences as Steig's. For ourselves, we found them mildly amusing the first time around, far more humorous on the second and third looks, and after that they'd become such good friends we were no longer able to judge them.
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Gardner Rea
"Shucks, it's a statue!"
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Thoughts on Inspecting a Navel
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Earl Wilson
One simmering Summer night, at the big Broadway saloon called the Hurricane, I was almost blinded by something that shone, glistened, and sparkled from the navel of a gal named Leticia.
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Roll Out The Rolov
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Harry C. Crosby, Jr.
Maryn was bored. She emerged from her bath dripping and unattractive, and waited resignedly as the Warm-Dry blew her lank young hair back from her forehead. The autotape whipped out and took the measurement of her immature figure.
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Tournament Bridge
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William Rosen
Bridge is one of the oldest card games still being played. Once known as euchre, it passed through various stages and was successively known as whist, partnership whist, auction bridge, and finally, contract bridge. The game holds a beguiling interest to most people because it is undoubtedly the most challenging of all card games, combining skill in bidding, play of the hand and, also, the subtle art of gamesmanship. Gamesmanship, as defined in an amusing book on the subject by Stephen Potter, is the art of winning without actually cheating. In bridge, the expert uses gamesmanship, when he not only plays his cards but also his opponents, in attempting to gain the maximum from the hand.
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R. Loehle
"Perfect state of preservation, professor--36-26-36!"
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Playboy at the Chafing Dish
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Thomas Mario
playboy's food & drink editor
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Jane
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Those who consider the English a rather stuffy bunch have never met Jane, England's favorite cartoon character. Americans, used to Blondie and Little Orphan Annie, would probably find this beautiful British comic-stripper a little disconcerting. Picture, if you can, Daisy Mae out hunting Li'l Abner in her birthday suit, or the sinister Dragon Lady stepping from behind an oriental curtain completely nude. That's just the sort of thing Jane's enthusiastic fans have learned to expect of their heroine in her daily appearances in the London Daily Mirror.
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Punch's New Yorker
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Not all of England's cartooning is as breezy as Jane. Punch, Britain's famous humor magazine, recently did a satire on its equally famous American counterpart, The New Yorker. This included take-offs on several of The New Yorker's cartoonists, in styles so close to the originals that even regular TNY readers will have difficulty telling the difference.
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Playboy's Party Jokes
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As Sam the fruit man reminded us the other day, the apple of the average playboy's eye is usually the prettiest peach with the biggest pear.
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Females by Cole: 4
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Jack Cole
The Virgin
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lo-llo-brìg-i-dä
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"I was walking down the street minding my own business when this man came up to me and said he wanted to put me in the movies. I got very angry and told him that line stopped working yeras ago."
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Peter Estin
"I'll ask the questions, sir!"
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Al Stine
"It's my husband, but relax--he's sneaking into your apartment across the hall."
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Ribald Classics
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Boccaccio
The Gardener and the Nuns
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R. Loehle
"Sorry I'm late, mamma--my zipper stuck."
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Arv Miller
"Look, Skipper--land ho!"
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Paradise
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John Held, Jr.
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advertisement
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Display Ad
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Playboy
Playboy
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Next Month
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Poor Playboy's Almanac
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In This Issue
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"Black Country" by Charles Beaumont the most exciting jazz story since "Young Man With A Horn"
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