Issue: 19150201

Monday, February 1, 1915
FEB. 1915
2
True
35
Monday, October 13, 2014
1/15/2016 1:28:50 AM

Articles
cover
95
95
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0001.xml
advertisement
96
96
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Wing & Son
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Wing & Son
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0002.xml
advertisement
97
97
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ITHACA GUN CO.: ITHACA SINGLE BARREI TRAP GUN
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ITHACA GUN CO.
ITHACA SINGLE BARREI TRAP GUN
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0003.xml
advertisement
97
97
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OUTDOOR LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY
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OUTDOOR LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0004.xml
article
98
98
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THE MARCH OUTDOOR LIFE (SPECIAL FISHING NUMBER.)
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PROBABLY no form of sport engages the popular fancy to such an extent as fishing. The pauper and the millionaire, the laborer and the lender—they all touch elbows on the fishing trains and stages, and swap lies from the same log around the campfire in the evening.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0005.xml
advertisement
99
99
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WINCHESTER: .22 CALIBER
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WINCHESTER
.22 CALIBER
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0006.xml
advertisement
99
99
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Advertisements
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R. C. KRUSCHKE
Brilliant Search Light
R. C. KRUSCHKE
THE NORTHWESTERN CLASP KNIFE
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0007.xml
advertisement
99
99
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C. W. DuBois: STEWART’S PHOSPHOR
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C. W. DuBois
STEWART’S PHOSPHOR
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0008.xml
advertisement
100
100
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OUTDOOR LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY
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OUTDOOR LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0009.xml
advertisement
101
101
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Columbia Graphophone Co.
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Columbia Graphophone Co.
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0010.xml
advertisement
102
102
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Northwestern School of Taxidermy
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Northwestern School of Taxidermy
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0011.xml
advertisement
102
102
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OUTDOOR LIFE PUB. CO.
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OUTDOOR LIFE PUB. CO.
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0012.xml
masthead
103
103
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0013.xml
tableOfContents
103
103
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STORY CONTENTS
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OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0014.xml
article
104
104,105,106,107,108,109,110
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WINTER FISHING
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CHARLES STUART MOODY
The Rocky Mountain whitefish (Coregonus williamsoni) is not what you might call a “game” fish, so you will have to content yourself in reading this sketch without any thrilling descriptions of how the big fellow was hooked just off such and such a point and fought clear to shoal and back before he was finally brought to gaff.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0015.xml
article
110
110
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“Heimweh”
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LULA PEABODY
Oh, for a glimpse of the storm-swept sky, The roar of the wind and rain! I’m stifling in this hospital ward, And for sleep I pray in vain. I hate the noise of your city— Give me the boom of the sea! I hate your stocks and your markets— It’s "fisherman’s luck” for me!
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0016.xml
article
111
111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124
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THE GREATEST BEAR HUNT EVER
A grizzly and black bear hunt that netted thirteen hides and which furnished great sport and some thrilling experiences.
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MONT G. JONES
Leaving the Grand Central station, New York, at 10 :30 a. m., April 20,1914, on the Mohawk Express for Chicago, on the way to Cody, Wyoming, was a party of New York sportsmen bound for a bear hunt with Jones Brothers and Magill, owners of the Majo Ranch (of which concern the writer is a partner), fifty miles up the South Fork of the Shoshone River.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0017.xml
article
124
124
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The Bird Dog
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E. B. COOK
I bought a fine, new bird dog, A nice, brown, curly-furred dog, And not at all a cur dog, (So his owner testified.) “He’s fleeter than a hare, sir, He’ll face a grizzly bear, sir, And trace him to his lair, sir,” In praise his owner cried. I took him on a shoot then, And sent him for a coot, when He ate it, the galoot!
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0018.xml
article
125
125,126,127,128,129,130
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LARGE AND SMALL BORES IN SHOTGUNS
THE 16-GAUGE
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CHARLES ASKINS
The 16-gauge has for many years been a favorite with a class of sportsmen who may be considered conservatives. It is the largest of those guns termed small-bores. At a time when the 20-gauge found few purchasers and scant consideration from the manufacturer, nearly all our prominent gunmakers turned out a 16-bore along with their 12s and 10s.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0019.xml
article
131
131,132,133,134,135
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FIELD GLASSES FOR SPORTSMEN
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JOHN A. DONOVAN
The frequency with which this subject has been discussed in the magazines the last few years leaves but little excuse for further comment, were it not for the fact that with few exceptions each writer assumed the all-important glass is for the big game hunter alone.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0020.xml
article
136
136,137,138,139,140,141,142
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ROD MAKING FOR COMMON FOLKS
How I made a fifteen-dollar rod for six dollars and ninety-two cents.
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O. W. SMITH
Now that the “winter of our discontent" is upon us we naturally turn our attention to the tackle case, with its “rods, and reels, and traces.” He who thinks all of angling consists in fishing, knows nothing of the real attractivity of the pastime.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0021.xml
article
143
143,144,145,146,147
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CAPTURING WILD ANIMALS IN THE ORIENT
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ALBERTA CLAIRE
In a pretty suburban home on the outskirts of Dallas, Texas, there lives one of the greatest travelers and hunters of big game known to the public—though he is not known to the extent he should be, for he is such a modest, retiring sort of fellow, who talks of his trips all over the world as if they were nothing out of the ordinary.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0022.xml
article
147
147
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Praying for Peace
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K. C. B. in Seattle Times
I figured. That last Sunday. When everybody else was praying. For Peace. That it would be a waste of time. And space. For me. To say anything. And besides. I used to pray. For bob-sleds. And things. And never got them. And one time. When I was a little fellow.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0023.xml
article
148
148,149,150,151
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ELK TUSK HUNTING
ILLEGAL KILLING OF ELK.
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S. N. LEEK
Every elk has two tusks of ivory about the size of the end of a person’s finger and three-quarters of an inch long. Of what use they are to the elk seems to be unknown. They grow upon the upper jaw in the same place as a horse’s bridle tooth. They appear in the calf’s mouth at about six months of age and grow quite rapidly.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0024.xml
article
152
152,153,154
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CAMPFIRE TALKS
No. 34—A Shooting Star
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CHAUNCEY THOMAS
Once upon a time many moons ago I lay on my back on a mountain top and watched a shooting star curve the heavens like a flaming arrow—and then it was gone. The others were playing cards under the lean-to canvas by the campfire. I detest cards, hence lay there silently smoking and thinking, listening to the night sounds and watching the flames.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0025.xml
article
155
155,156,157,158
ANGLING DEPARTMENT
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Angler’s Fireside
Letter No. 73.—Removing Ferrule.
Letter No. 74.—Information Regarding Pike and Pike Fishing.
Letter No. 75.—An Interesting Letter from Australia.
Letter No. 76.—Thumbing the Casting Reel.
Letter No. 77.—A Little Dictionary of Flies.
Letter No. 78.—The Luminous Bob.
Letter No. 79.—A Colorado Catch.
Letter No. 80.—Self-Thumbing Casting Reels.
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O. W. SMITH
Editor Angling Department:—Last summer I was unfortunate enough to break my favorite rod, close up to the ferrule of the second joint. To date I have been unable to remove the wood. Is there any way of doing so?—L. C. C., Bozeman, Mont. Answer.—More than one-half the rods break at that point, close up to the upper ferrule of the second, or middle, joint.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0026.xml
article
158
158,159,160,161
ANGLING DEPARTMENT
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Trout Lore
Chapter 13.—Trout of the Little Brooks.
THE FASCINATION OF THE LITTLE BROOKS
FISHING THE LITTLE BROOKS
THE TROUT OF LITTLE STREAMS
WHERE THEY LURK
BAIT VS. FLIES
TACKLE FOR LITTLE STREAMS
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O. W. SMITH
Not every angler knows the fascination of little streams, the meandering, whimsical brooklets, but those who do never gaze with longing eyes in the direction of the mighty rivers, e’en though the latter hath power to bestow fish large beyond the imagining of the streamlet.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0027.xml
article
161
161,162,163,164
ANGLING DEPARTMENT
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Some Weedless Casting Lures
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O. W. SMITH
Naturally the demand for a weedless hook has been followed by the demand for a weedless bass lure. There are two reasons why this demand should be satisfied. First, because of the character of the average bass water; and, secondly, because of the growing popularity of night fishing.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0028.xml
article
164
164,165
ANGLING DEPARTMENT
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The Champion Fisherman of the Dollar Hole
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FRANK L. HAMMOND
Sprawled along the hillside above the falls of Clark’s Fork of the Columbia River in Western Montana, lies the picturesque village of Thompson Falls. It was here in the month of June, “when all the signs were right,” as we fishermen say, “I met the Champion Fisherman of the Dollar Hole.”
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0029.xml
article
165
165
ANGLING DEPARTMENT
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Molloy Replies to Howarth
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Editor Outdoor Life
Mr. Howarth somewhat resembles the orator who before he got up didn’t know what he was going to say; when he was up, didn’t know what he was saying; and when he sat down, didn’t know what he had said. In the November issue of Outdoor Life he writes: “What I meant to say and what I thought I wrote,” etc.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0030.xml
article
166
166,167
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Good Word for the Bear
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Editor Outdoor Life
The bear is the most abused animal on this continent—at least, that is what my experience and my observation teach me here in Colorado; and I am led to believe, from what I read and hear, that he fares no better elsewhere in the United States; whether his home is in the canebrakes of the Mississippi, the swamps of Florida, the gloomy forests of “John Brown’s Tract” or the deep, dark canons of Arizona, this ungainly brute is looked upon as a menace to civilization, a four-footed anarchist, the very Ishmael of the animal creation against whom the hands of all men are raised with murderous intent.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0031.xml
article
167
167
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Dr. Hornaday’s Appeal for the Bears
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W. T. HORNADAY
Dear Mr. McGuire:—I give you my heartiest congratulations on the stand that you have made for the preservation of the grizzly bear and other bears that need protection. It is a great satisfaction to see a genuine bear-hunter taking the initiative in the rather laborious business of securing protection for bears that will save them from extermination.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0032.xml
article
167
167
IN THE GAME FIELD
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From a Brother Sportsman Across the Water
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am writing to tell you that you have at least one devoted reader of your excellent magazine in this part of the world. I get my copy from a local bookstall and look forward to its coming every month, and very little, from front page to back page, escapes my notice.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0033.xml
article
167
167,168
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Trip to the Cassiar District and South Yukon
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Editor Outdoor Life
In your December, 1914, issue, I note W. Norton of California claims to own the record moose head, which he says is 74% inches. To my knowledge there are five larger heads, namely: 78% inches, owned by Field Museum, Chicago; 77% inches, owned by P. Niedrick; 75 inches, 42 points, owned by American National Collection (Reed Collection); 75 inches, owned by Canada Pacific Collection; 74% inches, owned by Captain C. R. E. Radcliffe.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0034.xml
article
168
168
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Buck Found in Velvet in October
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Editor Outdoor Life
I would like to be enlightened on the following: While hunting deer on the South Fork of the White River in Colorado during the last open season, I killed a six-point buck whose horns were still in the velvet, the velvet being scratched a little, and the horns were very sharp on the points.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0035.xml
article
168
168,169
IN THE GAME FIELD
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An Experience with a Lion in Colorado
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Editor Outdoor Life
When I received my copy of your magazine today I found so much that interested me that I cannot resist the temptation to “butt in” and tell some of my experience in Colorado. I had a log cabin about eight miles southeast of Glenwood Springs, east of Spring Valley and near Landis Branch.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0036.xml
article
169
169,170
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Snap-Shooting Goats in British Columbia
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Editor Outdoor Life
I herewith send you a picture of a mountain goat which was taken by myself on a goat-hunting expedition on one of the mountain ranges of the upper Kitsum Kalum Valley, British Columbia, the southern end of which approaches the Grand Trunk Pacific line close to Terrace, a thriving little town about ninety miles from Prince Rupert.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0037.xml
article
170
170
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A New Caribou of British Columbia
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Editor Outdoor Life
Enclosed please find photograph of a new kind of caribou. It is known as Rangifer Fortiden Hollister (Rocky Mountain caribou). It was discovered two years ago by Mr. Hollister of the Alpine Club expedition to the Mt. Robson region, British Columbia.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0038.xml
article
170
170
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Hybrid Wild Duck
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Editor Outdoor Life
I enclose herewith photograph that will interest all the duck hunters. This is a hybrid wild duck, a cross between a mallard and a widgeon, or baldpate, as they are sometimes called. This specimen was shot in eastern Colorado in November, 1914.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0039.xml
article
170
170,171
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Will Foxes and Coyotes Cross?
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Editor Outdoor Life
There is a peculiar thing here that has come to my notice, and and as it relates to our wild life, I thought it might prove interesting to the large family of Outdoor Life readers. During the latter part of 1912, while hunting coyotes with a couple of friends, we “jumped” a coyote which had an unusually bushy tail of a reddish color; we fired several shots at it but failed to score, as it was some 300 or 400 yards away, and running.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0040.xml
article
171
171
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Doe Deer that Carried Good-Sized Antlers
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Editor Outdoor Life
Enclosed is a plcture of what I believe to be the greatest antlered doe head in existence, killed on Wolf Creek, Mont., October 8, 1914, by Jess Hennings of Kalispell, Mont. The head carries, as the photo shows, a fully-developed set of antlers measuring in length, the longest antler about 18 inches and the other nearly as long.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0041.xml
article
171
171
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A New Kind of Fox Trap
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Editor Outdoor Life
My son Rex and I made a fish trap out of rabbit wire to catch suckers in the river. The trap has a funnel-shaped entrance, something the same as a wire fly-trap. During a sudden rise in the river we pulled the trap out on the bank, where it was left over night— and the next day we were much surprised to find a full-grown gray fox in the trap.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0042.xml
article
171
171
IN THE GAME FIELD
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The Last Elk in Pennsylvania
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Editor Outdoor Life
Enclosed herewith is a clipping from the Altoona Tribune which has some bearing on the article in your November issue stating that the last elk in Pennsylvania was killed in 1869. They lingered on for quite a few years after that, although only as stragglers.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0043.xml
article
171
171,172
IN THE GAME FIELD
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THE CLIPPING.
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It was in Centre County that the last native elk in Pennsylvania was killed by Captain John Decker, on September 1, 1877. It was in Centre County that the last native panther was killed in 1886. It was in Centre County that some of the last wolves met their deaths.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0044.xml
article
172
172
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Game Notes
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J. H. Lepper of Mason City, la., writes under date of Nov. 24, 1914: “I have never seen ducks as thick around Clear Lake as this fall, and so few shot. They spent the day in the middle of the lake and left the lake to feed between sun-down and dark, and so high that no ordinary gun could reach them.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0045.xml
article
173
173,174
THE MIXED~BAG
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Hunting Wild Honey
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Editor Outdoor Life
I have made it a practice for a number of years when going on my fall hunt to take along ten cents’ worth of oil of anise and a little strained honey. As soon as camp is established the weather being fair, I place a little honey in a can lid or some small vessel and a few drops of the anise on the honey.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0046.xml
article
174
174
THE MIXED~BAG
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An Eulogy on One of Our Emissaries
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Editor Outdoor Life
In your December number I was impressed by Miss Gladys Hardy and her beautiful horse, who are making the trip from Spokane, Washington, to the state of Maine. If accomplished (and she surely looks capable of doing it), this trip should certainly win a name for herself as one of the bravest little women in all the world, and one, too, of which the state of Washington (her home state) should feel justly proud; for such women as she are about as scarce as radium dollars and far more valuable, and it is womankind of this character, undaunted by the thought of her weaker sex (now fast passing away), full of courage to accomplish something worth while—that is to crown our women and make them the envy of every nation on this globe, and the pride of the American home.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0047.xml
article
174
174
THE MIXED~BAG
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A Shadowgraph
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J. A. DUNGAN
My friend, the guide, came into town And in my sanctum sat him down, And as he there cross-legged sate Eye-bulging tales did he relate Of beast and bird, yet of them all A single story I recall. About a “dude” he once took out, A man he’d often read about, Who was that handy with a gun He might keep four guides on the run.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0048.xml
article
175
175,176
DOG-DOM
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DOGGY QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
TRAINING, HANDLING, CORRECTING FAULTS AND CARE OF THE BIRD DOG.
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ED. F. HABERLEIN
S. A., Vallejo, Calif.—I have a female Airedale puppy, about ten months old, which I bought at four months old and is of thoroughbred stock. I want to train the pup for quail and deer hunting, which I understand can be done successfully, but want to train for quail first.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0049.xml
article
177
177,178,179,180,181,182,183,184,185
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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An American Bolt-Action Rifle For a Modem Cartridge
Recounting How the Idea Came to Find a Real American Rifle of the Most Modern and Strongest Type, Fit It for an Up-to-Date Cartridge, Both to Be Obtained Easily and at a Reasonable Cost. The Working Out of the Combination to a Much Desired and Successful Result.
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L. A. DANSE
Remember when you got your first air gun how you exulted in possession and imagined you were fixed? That was a happy time. You soon became expert, could knock a sparrow off the peak of the roof or a rat off the rafters in the old barn—but then you longed for other fields to conquer.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0050.xml
article
185
185,186
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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More About Revolvers
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Paul Patrick
I have been mightily interested in the revolver discussion that has been going on through the past few numbers of Outdoor Life between Messrs. Thomas, Bosley, Haines and “Burro Puncher.” I have just this minute finished reading Mr. Thomas’ article in the December number, which he concludes by stating that he is ready to be lynched, and issuing the invitation to “come on!”
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0051.xml
article
186
186,187,188,189
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Springfield Versus .405
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J. F. Reynolds Scott
Whether or not the Springfield is suitable for an all-around sporting rifle has been a much-discussed subject in most of our outdoor magazines for some little time. Considerable space has been devoted to the subject, velocity tables have been printed, weights of bullets and powder quoted, and the small-bore versus large-bore argument has waxed hot again.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0052.xml
article
189
189,190
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Comments on The Newton Cartridges and Arms
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Editor Outdoor Life
Thinking my experience might prove of interest to the readers of the Arms and Ammunition department, you may publish the following if you see fit: In answer to my request I received a short time ago a booklet from the Newton Arms Co., 506 Mutual Life Building, Buffalo, N. Y. When I sent for the catalog I was but mildly interested in knowing what the firm with Chas.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0053.xml
article
190
190
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Concerning the .22 Rim Fire
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C. S. LANDIS
The editor has called my attention to the article of Mr. Lorrilliere for a reply to his inquiry so I suppose I will have to produce. I have not tried the idea of sharpening the point, as at the low velocity of the .22 long rifle we have mighty little killing power at present and this will surely reduce it.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0054.xml
article
190
190,191
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The Obnoxious Anti-Weapon Law
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am sending you a clipping from a story in the last issue of The Wide World and the writer seems to think that an anti-weapon law is a failure. I think that every American should fight such a law any place in America. I also think there should be some law regarding the size and caliber of the rifle used on deer as there are too many small rifles used, which results in a large number of deer going off and dying and never being found.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0055.xml
article
191
191
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The Savage Rifles
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Editor Outdoor Life
I have been watching the articles in Outdoor Life’s Arms and Ammunition department with much interest. I cannot understand why Mr. Haines, in his articles on the Model ’99 Savage, has neglected to find fault with the safety used on same.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0056.xml
article
191
191,192
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
A Remodeled Lee Straight Pull Rifle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Editor Outdoor Life
I notice in Outdoor Life several interesting articles on the remodeling of guns. I will endeavor to describe this rifle, a 6mm. Lee Straight Pull. I will state that I only used such screws and other materials as were on rifle. The barrel of this rifle, as made for the U. S. N., is 28 inches long.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0057.xml
article
192
192
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
Making Revolver Bullets Mushroom
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[no value]
[no value]
Editor Outdoor Life
May I suggest through Outdoor Life that G. L. Chester try splitting his .45s nearly to the base by putting a piece of thick paper between the molds when making bullets. If you put 40 grains of black powder behind it I think 3 inches of cedar will be the limit.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0058.xml
article
192
192
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
The Noise of Bullets
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[no value]
[no value]
Editor Outdoor Life
Seeing Mr. Polk's article on the Maxim Silencer on the .22 high-power Savage, I would like to say that I agree with the Maxim people that the bullet makes more noise heard by his geese at 300 yards than the report of his gun. A bullet going at 1,200 feet per second or over makes a lot of noise.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0059.xml
article
192
192,193
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
An Old Flint-Lock
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[no value]
[no value]
Editor Outdoor Life
I am enclosing a picture of an old flint-lock gun. So far as I am able to learn, there have been no flintlocks used in this country since the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1805. The flint-lock, I find, was invented in the year 1630. Thinking that it might be of interest, as it is a type of the original gun, I send along this picture.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0060.xml
article
193
193,194,195,196,197
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
Arms and Ammunition Queries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Geo. McCreary, Denair, Cal.—I have recently purchased a new .22 high-power rifle. I find it hard to keep the rifle barrel clean. I have shot but two boxes of shells in it, and the barrel looks as though I had shot fifty. Can you tell me where the trouble lies?
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0061.xml
article
198
198
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
An Ingenious Attachment for a Bicycle
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Is cycling to receive another revolution? It would look very possible, judging from a new appliance that has just been placed on the market. It is the Smith Motor Wheel, made by the A. O. Smith Co., of Milwaukee, Wis. It consists of a gasoline motor mounted on a small wheel, which may be readily applied to any ordinary bicycle.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0062.xml
article
198
198
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
Our Big Special Fishing Number for March
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The next number (March) of Outdoor Life will be devoted almost exclusively to fishing subjects. It will be edited by O. W. Smith, our peerless angling editor, and will be the most interesting and valuable number of a sportsman’s magazine that has ever been given up to the subject before.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0063.xml
advertisement
199
199,13A
[no value]
[no value]
FISHING TACKLE AND IMPLEMENTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0064.xml
article
200
200
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
Some New Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Black Forest Souvenirs, by Henry W. Shoemaker; 404 pages; illustrated; the Bright-Faust Co.. Reading, Pa. The author of this entertaining volume has camped, hunted and fished among the timber-clad mountains of “the Black Forest” and there collected the folk-lore and pioneer romances which appear in this book.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0065.xml
article
200
200
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
Trade Literature
CALENDARS.
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[no value]
[no value]
The New York Sporting Goods Co., 15 and 17 Warren street, New York, have issued a very large and comprehensive book entitled “Sportsmen’s Handbook,” comprising nearly 500 pages. It is edited by Powhatan R. Robinson, and, aside from listing and describing every conceivable thing in the sporting goods line, has some valuable chapters on hunting big game and fishing in the various states and Canada.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0066.xml
article
200
200
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
[no value]
Our Bear-Protective Bill
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The bear bill that we have drawn up, text and arguments in favor of which appeared in our January number, is making splendid progress, especially in some of our Western states. We have received assurances at time of going to press that it will be presented at the present assemblies of California, Washington, Montana and Colorado, and believe that when plans for its presentation have matured in other states, we may have the satisfaction of seeing it go before at least a half dozen assemblies this winter.
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0067.xml
advertisement
9A
9A,15A,16A
[no value]
[no value]
ARMS AND HUNTING ACCESSORIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0068.xml
advertisement
10A
10A
[no value]
[no value]
MALLORY STEAMSHIP COMPANY
[no value]
MALLORY STEAMSHIP COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0069.xml
advertisement
11A
11A,20A,21A,22A,23A,24A
[no value]
[no value]
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0070.xml
advertisement
12A
12A
[no value]
[no value]
OUTDOOR LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY
[no value]
OUTDOOR LIFE PUBLISHING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0071.xml
advertisement
14A
14A
[no value]
[no value]
OUTDOOR LIFE PUB. CO.
[no value]
OUTDOOR LIFE PUB. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0072.xml
advertisement
14A
14A
[no value]
[no value]
OUTDOOR LIFE PUB. CO.
[no value]
OUTDOOR LIFE PUB. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0073.xml
advertisement
14A
14A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
ED. F. HABERLEIN
Mange Cure
ED. F. HABERLEIN
Eczema Cure
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0074.xml
advertisement
14A
14A
[no value]
[no value]
Ed. HABERLEIN
[no value]
Ed. HABERLEIN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0075.xml
advertisement
17A
17A,18A,19A
[no value]
[no value]
TAXIDERMISTS AND FUR DEALERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0076.xml
advertisement
25A
25A,26A,27A,28A,29A
[no value]
[no value]
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0077.xml
advertisement
30A
30A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0078.xml
advertisement
31A
31A
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH M. HERMAN SHOE CO.
[no value]
JOSEPH M. HERMAN SHOE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0079.xml
advertisement
32A
32A
[no value]
[no value]
PORTO RICO LINE
[no value]
PORTO RICO LINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19150201_0035_002_0080.xml