Issue: 19120901

Sunday, September 1, 1912
SEPTEMBER 1912
3
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30
Monday, October 6, 2014
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Articles
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0001.xml
advertisement
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A. H. Fox GUN COMPANY
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A. H. Fox GUN COMPANY
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0002.xml
advertisement
1A
1A
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American Woolen Company
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American Woolen Company
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0003.xml
advertisement
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2A
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KENNEL
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0004.xml
advertisement
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3A
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ARMS AND HUNTING ACCESSORIES
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0005.xml
advertisement
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4A,5A,6A,7A,13A
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MISCELLANEOUS
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0006.xml
advertisement
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8A
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Arms Company
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Arms Company
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0007.xml
advertisement
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8A
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JOHN SIMMONS COMPANY
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JOHN SIMMONS COMPANY
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0008.xml
masthead
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187,189
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0009.xml
tableOfContents
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187
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Story Contents
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0010.xml
article
12
12,189,190,191,192,193
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TIPS FOR THE TRAIL
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DAN BEARD
Of course I do not believe in smoking ; we are all better off without tobacco, whiskey, gin or rum, coffee or tea, but inasmuch as there are many outdoor men who do smoke, myself among the number, it is a good idea to know how to get a light for your pipe from the glowing end of a small stick or even the hot end of a pernicious cigarette.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0011.xml
article
194
194
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September
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NEIL FINCH
When September comes a-creeping And the chickens they are ripe, When the teal ducks are a-bunching And you see the busy snipe Come a rushing to the low lands, These are days you can’t forget : For long months you’ve been awaiting, On this day your thoughts were set.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0012.xml
article
195
195,196,197,198,199
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DOWN THE TIGRIS IN A SKIN RAFT
UNITED STATES CONSUL AT BAGDAD
HOW A KELEK IS BUILT.
PASSED ANCIENT NINEVEH, JONAH’S TOMB AND MODERN MOSSUL.
THROUGH THE PLAINS OF MESOPOTAMIA.
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FRED SIMPICH
A goat-skin, inflated with air, seems a queer object for a man to ride on— for even a short distance. Yet in 1910 I traveled 400 miles on goat-skins, blown full of Armenian mountain air. I confess it took more than one goat-skin—there were 150 under me when I started.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0013.xml
article
200
200,201
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Heads in Reflection
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BEN FIELD
In the summer of 1911 my friend and I took a horseback trip to the famous Yosemite Valley of California. Near Pine Ridge, about ten miles from the main entrance to the valley, we halted our horses one glorious day on the bank of a beautiful stream.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0014.xml
article
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202
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Alone
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E. A. BRININSTOOL
The trails are silent since you went away; It’s lonely here, and everything looks strange; The once-blue skies have turned to ashen gray, And seem to blot the sunshine from the range. I miss the silvery jingle of your spur I heard when I was ridin’ by your side, And when I think of you a sudden blur Gits in my eyes and blinds me as I ride.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0015.xml
article
203
203,204,205,206
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HOW TO MAKE AN INDIAN TEEPEE
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J. B. TIGHE
Without doubt the teepee, which has been used by the plains Indians for centuries, is the highest development of movable camp, and is the most comfortable type for all climates so far invented by man. It is simple and easily made, light and easily transported ; is rain and wind proof; warm or cool as desired; covers more ground space for amount of canvas used than any other form of tent ; can be opened in a moment or kept tightly closed and still be ventilated by the smoke hole in top ; it has no center pole or outside guys to trip over; meals can be cooked over fire in center in bad weather; with a slight smudge mosquitoes can be kept out; it is easily set up and quickly taken down; and, lastly, it is the only tent in which one can build an open fire—and stay in with the fire.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0016.xml
article
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207,208,209
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THE THIEF
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CHARLES H. LOCKWOOD
One sunny day in October a large, black bear shuffled over the hills in search of food. Occasionally he stopped near some blueberry or raspberry bushes and with his long, snakelike tongue he sucked off the choicest of the berries. There was no lack of them.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0017.xml
article
210
210,211,212,213,214,215
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OFFICIAL REPORT ON WYOMING ELK
Extracts from the findings of the special representative of the Biological Survey (U. S. Dept. of Agriculture) appointed to investigate the conditions of the elk of Wyoming.
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EDWARD A. PREBLE
That part of the valley of Snake River in Northwestern Wyoming usually called Jackson Hole has long been the principal winter home of large numbers of elk, or wapiti (Cervus canadensis). These animals, which spend the summer in the southern part of Yellowstone National Park and in the mountains south of it, are forced in winter to seek lower levels, where a lighter snowfall and a milder climate insure more favorable forage conditions.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0018.xml
article
216
216,217,218
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THE SECRETARY BIRD
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WALTER L. BEASLEY
Among the rare and remarkable birds which have just been received in the New York ZoÖlogical Park are the pair of secretary birds, male and female. These creatures are entirely new to the eyes of the American public, being the first live specimens to arrive and to be placed on exhibition in this country.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0019.xml
article
219
219,220
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AN INDIAN’S HUNT FOR GRUB
“HUNTER”
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This story was told me by an old Alaska miner. I cannot tell it in his own language, but will give the substance of it the best I can in my own way : “My pard and I went to Alaska with the rush. We went to Skagway and over the pass. We built a boat, and when the ice went out we went through the rapids and down the river in about the same way that hundreds of others did.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0020.xml
article
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220
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Heart of the Woods
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HELEN COALE CREW
Deep silences within the solemn woods Fall on the ear with echo faint and sweet, And twilight dim from dawn till darkness broods, And stillness surges with a pulse and beat. Soft yields the springy moss below one’s feet, Drowsy the languid breeze that ebbs and flows; With pine and balsam all the air is sweet, Soothing the mind from action to repose; Until the quiet on one’s sold and senses grows.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0021.xml
article
221
221,222,223,224,225
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WHAT A GRIZZLY BEAR CAN DO
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W. B. SHORE
On the 4th day of May, 1912, John Graham, for thirty years a hunter and trapper on the Upper Yellowstone, Montana, died from injuries inflicted by a big grizzly bear. Just how the whole thing happened and how the battle was fought no one will know, as there was no one present at the encounter, and John did not live to tell us; but the facts in the case, as near as we could tell from circumstantial evidence and deduction, were about as follows : Several days previously John had seen two big grizzlies in the locality where he was trapping, so he set a trap, and the day before the accident he trapped and killed a fine specimen of grizzly.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0022.xml
article
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225
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Out of Doors
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FREDERICK WILEY
Out-of-doors there are no books; In cloistered cells they crowd profuse. Out-of-doors the Act is spoken; In the cells the Word is token Of a dire misuse. Out-of-doors a mighty temple, Boundless, broad and deep. In the cells are walls so narrow That they crush a soul and harrow Every pinion sweep.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0023.xml
article
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226,227,228,229,230,231
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A COUGAR HUNT IN IDAHO
FRANK E. BROWN
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Having a couple of green Airedales, Dan and Jane, and a very fast Walker foxhound that I was anxious to try out on mountain lion, I proposed to my friend, Joe Mackey, who is mountain-bred and as game a sport as ever followed varmint dogs, that we go on a cougar hunt on the north fork of the Clearwater River (Idaho) approximately one hundred miles up that turbulent stream from its junction with the Snake.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0024.xml
article
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231
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Only a Dog
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BUSH PHILLIPS
Only a dog, and my day is done; Dreaming I lie stretched out in the sun. There’s old Master Daniel on the porch, and I Think he is dreaming of the days gone by. Oh, we were prime hunters in the country then, And Daniel was king of the hunter men. I dream of those times, when at break of day, With one blast on his bugle, and away, away.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0025.xml
article
232
232,233,234,235
CAMPFIRE TALKS
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No. 5
Write About the Hunt
THE CALF PATH.
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CHAUNCEY THOMAS
I know all about poetry. People have been trying to define it for centuries—but now take notice. Here is the correct definition: “Poetry is that which comes from poets.” That’s easy. Wonder some one didn’t think of it before. But first you have to get a poet!
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0026.xml
article
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236,237,238
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Trip on Vancouver Island
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We have received some inquiries regarding Vancouver Island, B. C., as a sportsmen’s paradise, but not having hunted on this particular island ourselves, we referred one of these inquiries to a man who has probably had as much experience in the Northwest as any in the United States—Mr. I. T. Alvord of Kent, Washington.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0027.xml
article
238
238,239,240
IN THE GAME FIELD
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The Porcupine as a Pest
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Editor Outdoor Life
I would like for some Christian friend to tell, if he can, the good qualities of a porcupine. I have about lost all my religion over this porcupine question, but for the benefit of unfortunate dogs that go against the porcupine I here with enclose photo and the way to care for the dog when badly “quilled.”
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0028.xml
article
240
240,241,242
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Game and its Enemies
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Editor Outdoor Life
Thinking that it may, perhaps, be interesting to readers of Outdoor Life, I will attempt to show how predatory animals have become a menace to the game of the West. Since the coyote does more harm than all other predatory animals combined, I will begin with the coyote and deal chiefly with him and his work.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0029.xml
article
243
243
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Bear That Left No Tracks
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Editor Outdoor Life
About three weeks ago Wm. Kurtzer, known by his friends as “Wild Bill,” emerged from the Beartooth Mountains with a bear story. This story must be true as Bill has the bear skin and other things to prove it with. Bill started out one afternoon to set his bear trap and soon came to a good location.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0030.xml
article
243
243
IN THE GAME FIELD
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True Sentiments Regarding Running Deer With Dogs
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Editor Outdoor Life
For some time I have been very interested in the controversy of running deer with dogs, and in my opinion it should be stopped by law. For two years I lived in Tacoma, Wash., and have hunted in the Olympic mountains and around the Sound country generally, and although a great number of deer are killed annually I have never used a hound myself and am pleased to be able to say it.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0031.xml
article
243
243
IN THE GAME FIELD
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New Game Regulations in Alaska
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The following changes in the Alaska game laws have been reported to us from the Biological Survey, U. S. Dept. of Agriculture: Open season for deer.—The season for killing deer in southeastern Alaska shall be limited to the period from August 15 to November 1, both inclusive.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0032.xml
article
244
244,245
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Open Seasons for Game in the United States and Canada, 1912
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Henry Oldys
C. E Brewster
Frank L. Earnshaw
The table on the opposite page shows the open seasons for game in the United States and Canada arranged on a uniform plan. The first date of the open season and the first date of the close season are given, so that close seasons may be found by reversing the dates.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0033.xml
article
246
246,247,248
FISHES AND FISHING
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FISHES AND FISHING
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CHARLES BRADFORD
Carrying the Rod.—Dr. E. F. Conyngham of Bonner, Mont., doesn't like my idea of carrying the rod tip first. The Doctor says he favors carrying it butt first with the tip trailing behind. The subject is one of importance from a practical standpoint and the views of experienced anglers always makes interesting reading.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0034.xml
article
248
248,249
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Observations Concerning Fish Producing Streams
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Editor Outdoor Life
Within the last week I have been asked the question, “What has been the main reasons of certain streams being almost depleted of fish, that under natural conditions alone, without artificial restocking, had always been reasonably abundant?” To this question I can only make this reply: We all know that civilization and the settlement of the country has always destroyed the productiveness of waters that have been the haunts of fish, by interfering with the natural laws of propagation and the destroying of the natural food, to a more or less extent.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0035.xml
article
249
249
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Another Theory on the “Blunt-Nose Trout”
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Editor Outdoor Life
Since writing you last in regard to the “blunt-nose trout,” Charles Miles, a local angler, caught one of these fish. It was taken from Rock Creek (Rocky Ford of the Yellowstone), a short distance below this city (Red Lodge, Mont.) and was of the same size as those mentioned in the May issue.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0036.xml
article
249
249,250
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Landing a 13-Pound Trout
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J. W. Scott of Armstead, Mont., about a couple of months ago landed what has been called the “record black spot trout of Montana,” and this is what he writes about it: “It’s a sin to send a lot of fellows out here on the strength of that big fish. I have fished industriously for fifty years.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0037.xml
article
250
250
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Non-Resident License for Fishing on Reservations or Private Property
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Editor Outdoor Life
If I fish on an Indian reservation outside of my home state, as a guest of an Indian resident of the reservation, with permission from the agent on this reservation, can the state in which this reservation is located compel me to pay a non-resident fishing license?
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0038.xml
article
250
250,251,252
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Eastern Brook Trout in Western Waters
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Editor Outdoor Life
I have just read Mr. O. K. Pressentin’s article on page 169, August issue of Outdoor Life, under the caption “Brook Trout in the Far West.” I have also read the following article, “Little Salmon of the Streams,” which is a comment on Pressentin’s article, and is very sensible throughout.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0039.xml
article
252
252
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Where Do Our Game Fish Go?
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Editor Outdoor Life
Yes, where do they go? This question is answered alike by only two persons out of ten. Some are caught and eaten by mink and snakes, large numbers are lured into the irrigation ditches, few are taken by the sportsman, but the greatest number are taken by the fish “hog.”
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0040.xml
article
253
253,254
DOG-DOM
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DOGGY QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
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F. G., Salt Lake, Utah.—My setter bitch has a litter of as nice puppies as anyone ever saw. Some old dog men who have seen them say that the dam certainly must be well bred, but I have no pedigree of her. I bred to a pedigreed dog and would now like to have the bitch registered so that the puppies will also be eligible for registry.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0041.xml
article
255
255,256,257,258
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Modern Hunting Rifles
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Charles Newton
The .25-caliber rifles described in the last issue meeting the requirements of those sportsmen who are satisfied with a power equal to that of the New Springfield cartridge, we have next to deal with those who prefer the more powerful rifles, of the .35 Winchester center fire and .405 Winchester center fire type, giving an energy of about 3,000 ft-lbs.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0042.xml
article
258
258,259
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Remodelling a Muzzle-Loading Colt
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D. Wayne George
Mr. Newton’s article in the March number started me to thinking about altering an old .36-caliber six-shot Colt, powder-and-ball revolver, which came into my possession when a boy, and up until that time had been looked upon as a relic only.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0043.xml
article
259
259,260
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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An Experience With the Maxim Silencer
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I. J. Bush
I see in the June number of Outdoor Life Mr. C. F. Lass wants to know about the Maxim Silencer, and as I have had an experience with one I will tell him and the other readers of Outdoor Life about it. During the Madero revolution in Mexico I picked up on the battlefield a 7 mm. Mexican Mauser carbine, and as I had seen the shooting qualities of the little 18-inch-barrel gun tried out on several occasions (when I was sometimes the target) I was much pleased to possess one, especially as it only cost the exertion of rolling a dead Federal soldier off of it, and I sent it to Mr. Windhammer of Los Angeles for re-stocking, and when he returned it I had a little beauty of which I was very proud.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0044.xml
article
260
260,261
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The .35 and .405 Winchesters on Deer
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C. A. Neal
I am aware that the discussion of the relative merits of the large and small-bore rifle covered the subject pretty thoroughly, and while I am of the big-bore persuasion, being the owner of a .405 Winchester, I am inclined to think the small-bore men overestimate this model in particular.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0045.xml
article
261
261
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Powerful Guns This Man’s Choice for Big Game
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am much interested in the discussions going on in regard to guns and ammunition. As I started my field sports sixty-three years ago with an old flintlock Yeager of an ancient courier of Boise who had grown too old to use it himself, and since then have used all kinds down to the latest models.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0046.xml
article
261
261,262
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The .25 Calibre Colt Automatic Pistol
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Editor Outdoor Life
What is the matter with the .25 Colt automatic pistol? I have seen very little discussion concerning it. I understand large sales have been made and would like to make a few statements concerning it. I do not pretend to be a pistol shot but have used the .32 and .25 Colt enough to form a fair opinion of them.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0047.xml
article
262
262
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Plate Glass and Fine Sand as Bullet Stoppers
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am sending you photos of a board that was shot into with a Winchester .405 caliber, hard-point bullet, first passing through a heavy piece of plate glass 20 inches in front of board. The glass was ⅜ inch thick and 1 foot square. The largest piece of bullet penetrated five boards only after passing through the glass.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0048.xml
article
262
262,263
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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For a .25 Rim-Fire Lever Action Rifle
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Editor Outdoor Life
In Mr. C. H. Drew’s article in Outdoor Life for March on a lever action rifle to handle the .25 caliber Stevens rim-fire cartridge is what I have been looking for, but up to the present time have not been able to find one or get any gunsmith to rebore one for me.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0049.xml
article
263
263
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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For Shooter with Defective Eye-Sight
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Editor Outdoor Life
Regarding the communication from David P. Platt and your reply in the June number, I think that perhaps I can help the brother out a little. Evidently he does not stand in correct position for revolver shooting, because if he did, he would not know which eye was used in lining up the sights with the target.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0050.xml
article
263
263,264
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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For the Snap Shooter
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Editor Outdoor Life
I notice a reader asks concerning the relative merits of the lever and trombone .22 rifles as guns for snap shooting. Now, I have owned and used both types of rifle and must say that for all the time and every use I prefer the .22 Remington, target grade, trombone.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0051.xml
article
264
264
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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An Automatic Holster
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Editor Outdoor Life
You will find enclosed a photo of an automatic gun holster which is the result of an article that I read in one of your back numbers about a year ago. It related to the common gun holster as not being handy to carry, and that it had not been improved upon.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0052.xml
article
264
264,265
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Organizing a Gun Club
IX.
Proper Loads.
The Guncase.
Shell Bags.
Shooters’ Gloves and Hand Protectors.
Cleaning Rods, Etc.
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This of course with the more experienced shooter is largely a matter of taste. Some prefer one brand of powder and some another; some like a 3-dram load of a bulk powder (or its equivalent of 24 grains of dense powder), while others pin their faith to heavier loads.For 16-yard targets, that is to say, for shooting at targets from the 16-yard mark a 3-dram load, or its equivalent of a dense powder, is all that is necessary.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0053.xml
article
265
265,266
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Prefers Rifles of Moderate Power
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Editor Outdoor Life
I noticed an article in the April number of your splendid magazine by C. V. Oden, in which he “knocks” the .25-35 by saying that it is not a deer gun, inasmuch as the caliber is too small, etc. Mr. Oden says that he has only shot one deer with that size rifle, and that the deer ran about sixty yards with a bullet through his heart, and that he had considerable trouble in finding him after he fell.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0054.xml
article
266
266
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The Denver Handicap
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During the month of September, the 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th, as announced in our last issue, there will be pulled off in Denver, under the management of A. E. McKenzie, the Denver Handicap at targets, with $5,000 added money. Mr. McKenzie states: “It has been my aim to make this tournament as plain as possible, thereby relieving it of any complications that might be misunderstood.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0055.xml
article
266
266
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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“The Long Shooters” in Book Form
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When Mr. Altsheler, the author of “The Long Shooters,” first published an account of 300 yards revolver shooting at the Pewee Valley live turkey shoot, New Year, 1910, the report was vigorously arraigned as being not only untrue but impossible.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0056.xml
article
266
266,267
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Experiences With the Maxim Silencer
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Editor Outdoor Life
In response to Mr. Lass’ enquiry about the experience others have had with the Maxim silencer wish to, state that I had a .22 caliber W. R. F. rifle fitted with one, also a small Winchester bolt action .22 caliber shooting the short and long cartridges.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0057.xml
article
267
267,268
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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A New Remington High-Power Repeater
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The American big game hunters will be more than pleased, we feel confident, when they are informed that the Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Company are soon to place on the market a high-power rifle of light weight, excellent balance, symmetrical form, and one capable of showing speed in operation only exceeded by the automatics.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0058.xml
article
268
268
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Prefers the Savage
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Editor Outdoor Life
From time to time enquiries have appeared in the sporting magazines regarding the Savage rifle— whether it is accurate, whether its action is reliable etc. For the benefit of these enquirers and others who may be looking for the best in a sporting rifle, I desire to write a little of my experience with the Savage.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0059.xml
article
268
268,269
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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A Big Game Hunter Talks of Power and Caliber
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Editor Outdoor Life
There is one subject on which I would like to say a few words and that is the rifle for big game. Since coming to Idaho in 1903 I have had, perhaps, unusual opportunities to observe the effect of our modern arms on large game and to compare with the old large bore arms of twenty years ago.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0060.xml
article
269
269,270,271
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Remarks Suggested by Mr. Smith's Articles
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ASHLEY A. HAINES
The preceding article, with one in the May number which was also written by him, has proven of exceptional interest to me, and as the author of these articles has asked my opinion concerning some suggestions he has offered concerning a lever gun which is to be somewhat different than some we now have, I hasten to comply, realizing, however, that it may prove of little value when rendered.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0061.xml
article
271
271
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Savage H. P. 22 vs. 9mm. Sauer-Mauser
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Editor Outdoor Life
I will try and give my ideas in regard to both the new Savage H. P. 22 and the 9mm. Sauer Mauser. I got the .22 when they were first put on the market, and for weight, looks and balance I have yet to find out where my extra $25 is to be found in the Mauser, unless it is the set triggers.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0062.xml
article
271
271,272,273,274
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Common Knowledge Concerning Rifles
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R. L. Glasgow
Everything—tangible or intangible—is infinite in the number and character of its relationships to other things. Therefore, the finite mind is incapable of a comprehensive knowledge concerning anything to a perfect degree. But there is a sort of knowledge given to man which is sufficient unto his earthly needs, and it is only necessary that he make intelligent use of his faculties to obtain it.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0063.xml
article
274
274
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Concerning the New High-Power Stevens
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At the Sportsman’s Show in New York 1 saw for the first time a Stevens high-power .35-caliber rifle. It was a neat-looking gun, and I wonder if any of your readers who have used it would let me know the result of their experience? Comparing it with the Winchester 1895 model, *.35 caliber, the barrel of the latter is 24 inches long, its weight 8y2 pounds; it has a box magazine, and the capacity of the gun is five cartridges.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0064.xml
article
274
274,275
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Another Remodeled Colt
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Editor Outdoor Life
Noticing a query from a contributor in regard to changing a cap-and-ball revolver to a cartridge gun and Mr. Thomas’ reply, I will send a description of the operation by which some are converted: First remove the cylinder and place in a lathe, then cut it around, as shown in the sketch as line “A-B.” The tube “C,” carrying the ratchet “D,” is left about 1/4 inch thick.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0065.xml
article
275
275,276
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Rifles of the .30-30 Class Powerful Enough for This Man
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am very much interested in the discussion concerning the proper caliber rifle for deer shooting. If any one should tell me that a .30-30 was too small for deer I should tell him that, in my opinion, he was wrong. A .30-30 is powerful enough for me.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0066.xml
article
276
276,278
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Arms and Ammunition Queries
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Robert E. Norfleet, Kansas City.—I am intending to purchase a new rifle and I am badly in need of some reliable information. In the past I have used a .45-70-caliber, 1886 Winchester, but it is entirely too much gun. Small bores for yours truly hereafter.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0067.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
DU PONT POWDER CO.
[no value]
DU PONT POWDER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0068.xml
advertisement
279
279
[no value]
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HUNTER ARMS COMPANY: L. C. SMITH GUNS
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HUNTER ARMS COMPANY
L. C. SMITH GUNS
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0069.xml
article
12A
12A
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BOOKS FOR THE SPORTSMAN
Trade Literature
New Sporting Accessories
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[no value]
[no value]
Stories of Some Shoots, by James A. Drain: 114 pages; $1.25 net; Arms and The Man Pub. Co., Washington, D. C. This is a breezily-narrated experience of an American sportsman in the Scottish Highlands, where he stalked the Scotch stag on its native heath and shot the Scotch pheasant in real Scotch heather.
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0070.xml
advertisement
13A
13A,26A,27A,28A,29A,30A
[no value]
[no value]
MISCELLANEOUS
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0071.xml
advertisement
14A
14A
[no value]
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FISHING TACKLE AND IMPLEMENTS
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0072.xml
advertisement
15A
15A
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TAXIDERMISTS AND FUR DELERIS
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0073.xml
advertisement
16A
16A,17A,18A,19A,20A,21A,22A,23A,24A,25A
[no value]
[no value]
ARMS AND HUNTING ACCESSORIES
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0074.xml
advertisement
31A
31A,32A,33A,34A
[no value]
[no value]
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
[no value]
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0075.xml
advertisement
35A
35A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Pabst Blue Ribbon
[no value]
[no value]
Pabst Blue Ribbon
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[no value]
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0076.xml
advertisement
36A
36A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0077.xml
advertisement
37A
37A
[no value]
[no value]
NORTHWESTERN SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY
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NORTHWESTERN SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY
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[no value]
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OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0078.xml
advertisement
38A
38A
[no value]
[no value]
Abercrombie & Fitch Co.
[no value]
Abercrombie & Fitch Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0079.xml
advertisement
39A
39A
[no value]
[no value]
Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co.
[no value]
Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0080.xml
advertisement
40A
40A
[no value]
[no value]
J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co.
[no value]
J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co.
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[no value]
[no value]
OutdoorLife_19120901_0030_003_0081.xml