Issue: 19120101

Monday, January 1, 1912
JAN. 1912
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Tuesday, October 7, 2014
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Articles
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0001.xml
advertisement
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N. W. SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY
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N. W. SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0002.xml
advertisement
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MISCELLANEOUS
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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Story Contents of this Number
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0004.xml
masthead
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0005.xml
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2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16
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SHOOTING THE VANISHING SHEEP OF THE DESERT
Chapter I. of this series, in our last number, related the desert ride of about 100 miles from Calexico, California, to the sheep camp in the Tenega Mountains of Lower California, and described the killing of two sheep by Mr. Humphrey at extremely long ranges.
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W. E. HUMPHREY
Mrs. Humphrey and Dunn had gone up the mountainside a short distance when they were seen and stalked by what they claimed to be a very large ram. It came up within a few yards of them, as they were sitting down, and did not leave until the Mexican, violating all orders, took one of my rifles from the camp and shot at it.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0006.xml
article
17
17,18,19,20,21
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A NEW BRUNSWICK MOOSE HUNT
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ALBERT G. ALTER
We arrived at our camp, eighteen miles from the railroad, on Friday afternoon, September 30th, 1910, tired and hungry, but in high good humor. Our camp was on Six-Mile Brook, in Northumberland District, New Brunswick. The party consisted of Arthur McNamara, Harry Harvuot, Joe Davis and myself, with Bert Donald and Henry Arbeau as guides.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0007.xml
article
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22
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Peter Pan’s Illusions
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ONEY FRED SWEET
IN the land of Make-believe was where Peter Pan lived. He never wanted to grow up. He wanted to be a boy always and have fairies for his companions and fight Indians and pirates in his dreams. Each morning he felt for his chin to see if a beard had started, and he was ever in dread of having to go to an office or becoming a president when he was a man.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0008.xml
article
23
23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33
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THE LOG OF THE “OUTDOOR LIFE”
This, the second chapter of Mr. Ricker’s motor boat trip to Nome, Alaska, recites the experiences of himself and companion, Mr. Joseph Ingersoll, on that part of their journey extending from Princess Royal Island to Skagway, where they had to resort to the railroad over White Horse Pass. The next chapter will follow their trip down the Yukon River. Comments on the game hunting of Southeastern Alaska.
PART II
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J. A. RICKER
We made Frasier Reach at noon. As far as we could see the change from Graham’s Reach to Frasier’s Reach was to favor some person’s name, for it was just the same narrow waterway between mountains, that kept you guessing which way you were to turn to keep from running straight onto the almost perpendicular cliffs dead ahead.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0009.xml
article
34
34,35,36,37,38
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THE LYNX AND HIS HABITS
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FRANK MOSSMAN
In the early ’80s I settled in Mason county, Washington. My home was near the foothills of the famed Olympic mountain range, where the largest elk on the American continent roam today. When I first settled on Totten’s Inlet, as this arm of the great Puget Sound sea is called, there were deer, bear, mink, otter, cats of three kinds, cougar and ducks and birds by the thousands.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0010.xml
article
39
39,40,41,42,43,44
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ON THE TRAIL OF THE MOWITCH
PART II
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ASHLEY A. HAINES
Early one morning, somewhere around 4 o’clock, if my memory serves me accurately, I tumbled out of bed, hurriedly dressed, except for my feet, and descended the stairway with more or less caution to avoid, if possible, disturbing the sleeping members of the household, intent on building a fire in the kitchen range and hurriedly throwing together a breakfast of the old bachelor-day brand, an event to precede my departure for the hills in quest of the elusive but fascinating (for the hunter at least) mowitch.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0011.xml
article
44
44
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Winter
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ROBERT PAGE DINCOLN
A carpet of soft diamond snow lies at his feet! And in his saintly hand an ice scepter rests— In dread repose tho hard his reign he wrests From the fair arms of summer all her hidden sweet. Down frosted alleys hoary winds lament and beat— Weary upon his wooded door.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0012.xml
article
45
45,46,47
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A LION THAT WOULDN’T STAY CAUGHT
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H. R. COLLIER
Supper was over, and the boys lounged about a roaring campfire, smoking and discussing the events of the day. It was mid-summer, but the nights at that altitude were quite cold, and occasionally a piece of Nature’s crooked work was fed to the flames, causing a shower of sparks and a grunt of disapproval from some one who had to move.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0013.xml
article
48
48,49
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Believes Humane Sentiments Should Govern the Running of Bears with Dogs
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Editor Outdoor Life
Will you permit a word or so of mild protest against the increasing attention given to the dog in your otherwise faultless magazine? I am not a big game hunter. I have hardly got beyond the class designated by our whimsical friend, Mr. Chauncey Thomas, as a “tin canner,” but I have the deep, inborn love of a firearm that makes all gun lovers kin.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0014.xml
article
49
49
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Colorado Deer Hunting
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To show that deer in Colorado are not entirely extinct we publish herewith a picture showing six hunters (the seventh was missing when photo was taken), and seven deer that were killed on the South Fork of the Williams Fork, Rio Blanco county, Colorado, during the season of 1911.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0015.xml
article
49
49,50
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Chapter on Bears
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Editor Outdoor Life
Mr. S. F. Lee’s article in October Outdoor Life about the “perfesh” and the difference in the conduct of bear is right to the point. My experience has taught me a lesson, and I want to warn every bear hunter to look out. Bears are like dynamite—they go off unexpectedly sometimes and the results are terrific.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0016.xml
article
50
50,51
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Kill the Varmints
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Editor Outdoor Life
Our sportsmen and game-law makers are overlooking one very important thing in their efforts to preserve and multiply the fish and game. They make what laws are necessary to prevent the citizen and poacher from destroying the fish and game throughout the breeding season, and to restrict them as to the number killed during the open season, but they make no provision for the destruction of the natural enemies of our game and fish, that prey upon them constantly, day in and day out the year round, open and closed season alike.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0017.xml
article
51
51,52
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Famous Cougar Dog’s Last Fight
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am enclosing photographs taken of my best cougar dog that was killed last year—one of which also shows the cougar that did the work. I heard him kill the dog, and spent over an hour looking for the cougar. When I found him he was crouching behind a big rock, only his head showing, about fifteen feet away.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0018.xml
article
52
52
IN THE GAME FIELD
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The Age of Deer
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Editor Outdoor Life
C. A. Marsh wishes to know the life of a black-tail deer (I suppose be means the mule deer). He also wishes to know why one seldom sees a decrepit or poor old deer. The first question is the hardest to answer. We old hunters guess the age of the deer in the wild state to be 12 to 15 years with possibly an extreme case running as much as 20 years.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0019.xml
article
52
52
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Feathered Game in Iowa
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Editor Outdoor Life
In this section of Iowa we have fairly good quail shooting, some squirrels, and rabbits a-plenty for the boys. Old hunters tell me there is still a remnant of wild turkey in a broken, thicklywooded place about 25 miles southwest of here—near the Missouri line.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0020.xml
article
52
52,53
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Sportsman and Ex-State Game Warden Comments on Colorado Game
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Editor Outdoor Life
If you can spare the room in your splendid sporting magazine I want to say a few words to the sportsmen of Colorado concerning the amended game law by the last General Assembly. I do wish that the hunters of our state would wake up and see to it that we get a good game law before it is too late, before our game passes into history.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0021.xml
article
53
53
IN THE GAME FIELD
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How Far North Do Cougar, Elk, Cats, Etc., Range?
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Editor Outdoor Life
I enclose the name of Mr. H. E. Redmyer, a sportsman now residing in the state of Washington, but who was government herder of the reindeer that were first taken to Alaska by Dr. Sheldon Jackson. Later Mr. Redmyer was in charge of a reindeer herd near Nome, and also near Iliamna Lake, Alaska.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0022.xml
article
53
53
IN THE GAME FIELD
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How Often Do Bears Breed?
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Editor Outdoor Life
I had always thought that bears bred every year, but in a talk with one of my sportsmen friends he tells me that they only breed every two years. I have killed most of the big game found in the United States, including several bears, and really should know myself about this; but inasmuch as my calculations have been a little upset by the statement of my friend, I am going to ask some reader of Outdoor Life who knows to come to my rescue.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0023.xml
article
53
53,54
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Western “Terra Incognito”
The Clipping.
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Editor Outdoor Life
May an old subscriber butt in long enough to inclose this clipping from today’s “Saginaw Daily News”? I have only a “how-de-do” acquaintance with that part of the coast dealt with in the clipping, but if it is only fractionally true—the newspaper story—somebody ought to do something about it.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0024.xml
article
54
54
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Further Facts Regarding Oberlander’s Death
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Some months ago we published a letter from Charles L. Barker, the moose guide of Riley Brook, N. B., in which he casually referred to the death of Phil Oberlander in the Soudan, but as his letter lacked details, we requested Mr. Barker to enlighten us as much as possible as to the facts.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0025.xml
article
54
54,55
IN THE GAME FIELD
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The Tiger’s Tenacity of Life
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Editor Outdoor Life
In September Outdoor Life I observe an article “The Danger of Wild Animals,” which states that the grizzly bear is exceedingly hard to kill. I think therefore the following account of the death of a Bengal tiger might be of interest. In the year 1865 I was growing tea in Assam, Bengal.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0026.xml
article
55
55
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Remarkable Big Game Photographs
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The most wonderful photographs, without exception, of big game that we have ever seen have just been received from S. N. Leek of Jackson, Wyo. They are both 16x20-inch bromide enlargements. One shows, at close range, over 1,000 elk on the feed yard in Jackson’s Hole at a time when they were fed hay by the Wyoming ranchmen the past winter.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0027.xml
article
55
55,56
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Polar Bear Experiences in the Arctic
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Capt. F. E. Kleinschmidt, whose Alaska and Arctic stories have appeared in Outdoor Life, returned last month from the most successful hunting and picture-taking expeditions he has ever made. “From Nome,” writes Capt. Kleinschmidt, “we went into the Arctic as high as latitude 72 degrees, seldom reached except at such unusual seasons as happened this year.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0028.xml
article
56
56
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Eating Habits of Some Rodents
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Editor Outdoor Life
I notice an article in the September number of Outdoor Life by James L. Mason, inquiring: “Is the presence of squirrels dangerous to birds?” My personal experience and observation among tree squirrels in southern Indiana, central Wisconsin, and both tree and ground squirrels in California, has revealed this fact to me many times in 25 years, that squirrels will eat grain, nuts, fruit, birds and their eggs, meat, and even sundried carrion.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0029.xml
article
57
57
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Restocking Game Sections with Wyoming Elk
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Editor Outdoor Life
For some time past the sportsmen of Okanogan county, Washington, have been discussing the possibility of securing a herd of elk for propagation purposes in the Okanogan National forest. The matter has finally taken definite shape by the action of the Okanogan Game Protective League of Okanogan City, in addressing the federal authorities on the subject of transporting elk from Wyoming.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0030.xml
article
58
58,59
FISHES AND FISHING
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Ruminations of an Angler
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Angling is the poetic form of fishing. A mere hook, a piece of string and any sort of animate thing holding them near a body of water constitute a fisherman, and the fisherman may resort to any means to obtain his fishes. He may fish in season and out of season, and he may be as greedy and bloodthirsty as he wishes—still he’s a fisherman.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0031.xml
article
59
59,60,61
FISHES AND FISHING
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Salmon Fishing on the St. John, Quebec
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Mr. E. B. Hepburn, one of Colorado’s pioneers, and a man who enjoys the sports of gun and rod as keenly now as when he was a boy, recently received a personal letter from his brother, A Barton Hepburn, who is at the head of the Chase National Bank, New York, and who, by the way, only a few years back, was a member of the President’s cabinet.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0032.xml
article
61
61,62
FISHES AND FISHING
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Destruction of Fish Through Irrigating Ditches
The Resolution.
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am sending you a copy of a resolution that was introduced at the last meeting of the American Fisheries Society, which was held in St. Louis on the 5th of October. The resolution was offered by Mr. W. T. Thompson, who was for some time superintendent of the Government hatchery at Leadville, Colo., but who is now connected with the United States biological station at Fairport, Iowa.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0033.xml
article
62
62
FISHES AND FISHING
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A Large Tarpon on Light Tackle
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Editor Outdoor Life
I have just received a telegram from our secretary, Mr. J. E. Cotter, at Port Aransas, Texas, headquarters of the Aransas Pass Tarpon Club, informing me that he landed a 5-foot tarpon on standard Tuna Club 3-6 tackle, the regulations of which are wood rod not less than 6 feet long, weight of the entire rod not to exceed 6 ounces and a standard sixthread linen line.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0034.xml
article
63
63,64
DOG-DOM
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DOGGY QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
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ED F. HABERLEIN
G. H., New Westminster, B. C.—I have had the hard luck to lose a very fine English setter pup, which, thanks to the use of the Amateur Trainer, I was getting into firstclass shape. I am offered now an English setter puppy of about the right age and also a very finely bred Irish setter.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0035.xml
article
64
64
DOG-DOM
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The Fire Flies
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CARLYLE C. McINTYRE
Silently drifting, Tangling, shifting, Weaving with threads of gold At the patternless scheme Of a mystical dream That the realms of the dusk unfold. Gracefully wending, Swaying and bending, Lacing their strands of light In the fanciful ways Of a magical maze On the ebony breast of night.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0036.xml
article
65
65,66,67,68
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The Long Shooters, and the Origin of 300-Yard Revolver Shooting
II.—Revolvers at the Turkey Shoot.
III.—Remedies for Fuzzy Sights.
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William Brent Altsheler
The 200-yard range was closed. A cold November drizzle drove the target boy from the rifle pit. It was Sunday, the only day most of the members were sure of a holiday. They worked hard the other six. A handful of shooters defied the weather, as good shooters usually do, and, determined to have their sport outdoors, repaired to the old cement mill, and, trudging up the incline, found shelter for their outfits on the platform about the hopper of the rockcrusher.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0037.xml
article
68
68,69,70
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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.22 Caliber Target Revolvers
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C. H. Bean
As a regular reader of Outdoor Life I have noticed from time to time very interesting articles on the part of various writers on the merits of different sizes and different kinds of revolvers. Almost invariably the subject of discussion has been a .44 or .45 caliber man or grizzly-bearslaughtering cannon.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0038.xml
article
70
70,71
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Concerning Deer Rifles
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W. D. Griffith
I have received with much interest the account of Mr. James Hoffman in the October number of your valuable magazine, and while I do not in any way want to cast any reflections on the judgment of Mr. Hoffman, I cannot help but think he has not given the matter the thought he should.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0039.xml
article
71
71,72,73
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The New Savage Pistol Grip the Result of a Suggestion
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Ashley A. Haines
The writer has been guilty of having made many suggestions concerning changes in, or additions to, things in the shooting line, and this admission is cheerfully made. He has advocated, at different times, according to the mcod he happened to be in when the idea struck him, heavy guns and light guns, big bore and small bore, long guns and short guns—guns with tubular magazines, and others with the box type, as well as automatic and the better known hand functioned sort.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0040.xml
article
73
73
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Woodchuck Medicine
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Editor Outdoor Life
A few years ago a friend gave me some hollow-pointed bullets, used in my .32-40 rifle. I experimented with them by filling the cavity with fine powder and covering this with a G. D. cap, which just fitted the hole. I sealed it with a little warm beeswax and then it was ready for future use.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0041.xml
article
73
73,74,75
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Six Guns, Old and New
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Editor Outdoor Life
In the recent issues of your interesting publication the pocket arm controversy has kept me thinking that I would get an answer to my inquiry of some months past. I now consider that a portion of my query is answered and that the pocket automatic may be eliminated from the possibilities and I am almost of the opinion that the double derringer is “the thing.”
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0042.xml
article
75
75,76
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Comparative Penetration in the Various Shotgun Bores. Advantages of the Small Bores.
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"California"
The small bore shotgun is becoming very popular in the last year or two and many letters from its champions are constantly appearing in all the leading publications devoted to outdoor pursuits. It has seemed to the writer that many people have allowed their enthusiasm to carry them somewhat beyond the bounds of proven fact.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0043.xml
article
76
76,77
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Guns of the .30-30 Class
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"One From Colorado"
I desire to reply to Mr. Hoffman of Idaho and his criticism of Model 1894 Winchester guns and ammunition and agree with your note following in its entirety. I was the possessor of the first .32 Winchester Special caliber rifle that I ever saw; I bought it because of W. R. A. Co.’s recommend and I found same equal, if not superior, to what I had hoped to secure.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0044.xml
article
77
77,78
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Remarks on Recoil
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George Van Schaick
Chauncey Thomas and I were talking about it the other morning, before bedtime. We are great friends because, much as we have tried, neither of us has succeeded in talking the other to death about guns. I speak about shooting game and he discourses about the higher mathematics of ballistics.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0045.xml
article
78
78,79
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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A Made-Over Krag
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In November, 1910, I learned that the United States Army was disposing of some Krags. I wrote a letter of inquiry to the Chief of Ordnance, Washington, D. C. He informed me that the indorsement of the mayor of this city or a representative or senator from this state would be necessary before I would be allowed to make the purchase.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0046.xml
article
79
79,80
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The New Wray Bullet
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Editor Outdoor Life
The article describing my new patent bullet published in October number of Outdoor Life is fully appreciated and I desire to make one correction in your comments where you say: "Exhaustive tests might result in a metal patch being adopted covering more of the bullet than is shown in cuts.”
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0047.xml
article
80
80,81
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Final Tests for Rapidity With Lever Action Rifle
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It wasn’t necessary, I know, to make any further tests than have been reported recently in Outdoor Life concerning rapid fire with the lever action rifles in order to prove that they were not only as rapid at accurately aimed fire as the bolt guns, but far speedier, but as I mentioned a certain .30-40 box magazine rifle in my October article that I had ordered and promising when it reached me to see if a bit of life couldn’t be injected into its system, it seemed only proper that now the gun has fallen into my hands that I keep my promise and hand in my report at the earliest date possible.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0048.xml
article
81
81,82
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Trap Shooting is Good Practice for the Field
Organizing a Gun Club.
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It frequently happens that a crack shot at the traps is invited to shoot in the field, and that the work he does is a disappointment, not only to himself, but to his host. Some argue, therefore, that trap shooting is no aid to work in the field. No greater mistake could be made, because not only has the trap shooter learned how to handle his gun, to guard the safety of himself and those shooting with him, but he has also learned how to point his gun.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0049.xml
article
82
82
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The .22 Winchester Automatic Rifle
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Editor Outdoor Life
Although not a subscriber I have been a reader of your excellent magazine for about three years and I am sure it is the best of its kind. What I especially like to read is the letters from “Gun Cranks” and other sportsmen, especially those interested in the .22 rifle.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0050.xml
article
82
82,83
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Sights and Loads for the ’96 Krag Carbine
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Editor Outdoor Life
I purchased, some time ago, one of the model ’96 Krag carbines from the government, and after receiving the gun and giving it a thorough trial I can only say it exceeds my expectations. The gun is very accurate and in firstclass condition. I have fitted to it a Marble’s flexible rear and gold bead front sight.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0051.xml
article
83
83
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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A Boy Wonder with the Rifle
Note
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Editor Outdoor Life
Bloice Bowen, of La Junta, Colo., a schoolboy of eleven, is attracting considerable attention with his .22 rifle. Small in stature, but with a keen eye and steady nerve, young Bowen would easily pass for a boy eight years old. His father, William Bowen, a tailor, and also a crack shot with shotgun, first realized his son’s fondness for firearms when one day back of his store he noticed the lad shooting at tin cans, using an air rifle.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0052.xml
article
83
83,84
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Six-Gun Talk
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Editor Outdoor Life
I read with great interest the article by Chauncy Thomas, on the subject of holsters. Mr. Thomas has “packed” a gun longer than I have, but I must say that my favorite is the shoulder holster for every occasion. I find it the most accessable, and it seems to me to permit the revolver to be drawn with more speed than a pocket holster, or one worn on a belt under the clothing.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0053.xml
article
84
84
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Do Elongated Bullets Preserve Line of Projection?
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Editor Outdoor Life
Some years since I wrote to a sporting magazine and asked this question, “Does the elongated bullet preserve the line of projection or take the line of the trajectory. In other Avords, at long ranges does the bullet strike point on or more or less sideways?” Someone answered that he had tested it at 1,200 yards and that it always made a round hole by striking point on.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0054.xml
article
84
84,85
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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National Rifle Association Notes
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At a meeting of the Executive Committee important action was taken of great interest to gallery shooters. It was decided to adopt a qualification code for indoor work and a decoration was selected in the form of a watch fob for issue to members who made the qualifying score.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0055.xml
article
85
85
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Arms and Ammunition Queries
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Wayne J. Davis, Downs, Ill.—Will a shotgun with 28-inch barrel shoot as hard and as far as a longer one with same load used in each, both guns having same choke? Answer.—Your question is so nearly like one asked in a previous issue that we quote from answer to same as follows, the quotation being from letter from the wellknown Ithaca Gun Company: “‘Will a 26inch shotgun barrel shoot as close and as hard as a 30 or 32-inch barrel?’ beg to advise that our veteran barrel-borer, ‘Uncle Bob’ Edwards, spent all day yesterday boring 26, 28, 30 and 32-inch barrels with the same boring tools to insure their all being bored alike, and the targets from these guns we have before us.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0056.xml
article
86
86
TRAPPING
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Practical Information for Young Trappers
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1. The skunk and civet cat become prime earliest in fall and are of poor quality first in spring. The raccoon and opossum are of good quality next, followed by the mink and weasel. The muskrat has its best fur in December, January, February and March.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0057.xml
article
86
86,87,88
TRAPPING
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Trapping the Mink and Weasel
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The mink and weasel are animals whose habits are very much alike. They are found all over America. However, the skins of the latter are not much sought after by the trapper of the South, owing to the fact that very few furs taken in that locality are prime.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0058.xml
article
88
88
TRAPPING
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A Big Western Gun Store
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In this issue we present a very fine interior view of the salesroom of Frank A. Ellis & Son, 1623 and 1625 Arapahoe street, Denver. The entire room on the right is devoted to tools, cutlery and shelf hardware, and the perspective of the picture extends to the rear windows.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0059.xml
article
88
88
TRAPPING
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Death of Isaac Gutshall
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Many of our Colorado readers were shocked to learn of the death of Isaac Gutshall of Denver and Monument, Colorado, which occurred in Los Angeles, Calif., on December 1st, at the age of 67 years. Mr. Gutshall was typically a western man, who loved good horseflesh, made a business of raising it, and succeeded far beyond the average man in this walk of life.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0060.xml
article
89
89
TRAPPING
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OUR CURIOSITY PAGE
Photographs (accompanied by brief description) of natural or other curiosities, suitable for publication in this magazine are solicited. They will be paid for in accordance with their merit if published.
A RELIC OF HISTORY.
A WEB-SHAPED DEER HORN.
CLASSED AS A WORLD’S RECORD.
AN OBSTREPEROUS ROOT.
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The enclosed photo is of a bear skull, with a flint arrow point firmly imbedded in the skull. The arrow point has not been out of the skull and is just as it was found by Mr. Phil. K. Stephens last summer by the side of a little pond of water on Grand Mesa, above Cedaredge, Colo.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0061.xml
article
90
90,92
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Some New Books
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The Encyclopedia of Sport, edited by the Earl of Suffolk and Berkshire; complete in four large octavo volumes; richly bound in cloth; gilt tops; $12 net; over 2,000 illustrations in all; J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia. This work is a natural history of all the birds and beasts of the chase.
OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0062.xml
advertisement
9A
9A,13A,28A,29A,30A,31A,32A,33A,34A
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MISCELLANEOUS
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0063.xml
advertisement
11A
11A,14A,15A,16A,17A,18A,19A,20A,21A,22A
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ARMS AND HUNTING ACCESSORIES
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0064.xml
advertisement
12A
12A
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Advertisement
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0065.xml
advertisement
23A
23A,24A,25A,26A
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TAXIDERMISTS AND FUR DEALERIS
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0066.xml
advertisement
27A
27A
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KENNEL
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0067.xml
advertisement
35A
35A,36A,37A
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0068.xml
advertisement
38A
38A
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MISCELLANEOUS
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0069.xml
advertisement
39A
39A
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Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co.: REMINGTON UMC
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Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co.
REMINGTON UMC
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0070.xml
advertisement
40A
40A
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J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL COMPANY: The Stevens Off Hand Target Pistol No. 35
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J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL COMPANY
The Stevens Off Hand Target Pistol No. 35
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OutdoorLife_19120101_0029_001_0071.xml