Issue: 19111201

Friday, December 1, 1911
DEC.1911
6
True
28
Tuesday, November 4, 2014
1/15/2016 1:37:33 AM

Articles
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0001.xml
advertisement
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THE A. H. Fox GUN CO.
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THE A. H. Fox GUN CO.
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0002.xml
advertisement
1A
1A
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Advertisement: MODEL 1911
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MODEL 1911
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0003.xml
advertisement
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L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO.
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L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO.
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0004.xml
advertisement
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D. W. KING
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D. W. KING
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0005.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0006.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0007.xml
advertisement
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THE COLORADO TENT & AWNING CO.: RAINTEST WALL TENT
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THE COLORADO TENT & AWNING CO.
RAINTEST WALL TENT
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0008.xml
advertisement
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ALASKA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
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ALASKA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0009.xml
advertisement
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5A,6A,7A,8A
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Advertisements
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0010.xml
masthead
475
475
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OUTDOOR LIFE
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0011.xml
tableOfContents
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Story Contents of this Number
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0012.xml
article
476
476,477,478,479,480,481,482,483,484,485,486,487
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SHOOTING THE VANISHING SHEEP OF THE DESERT
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W. E. HUMPHREY
Calexico-Mexicali is the double name given to the little city bisected by the international boundary line between California and Lower California—the first being the name of the American half and the latter the name of the Mexican half. This name is formed, as will be seen, by a combination of the abbreviations for Mexico and California.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0013.xml
article
488
488
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BEAR AGER
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DR. G.W.HARVEY
Bear ager’s a tremble that gets in your gun, Whenever you meet with an extra big one; It’s Buck ager doubled and trebbled until, You can’t hold a bead on the side of a hill. In your shivering frenzy you pump out the lead. Widely over the hillside your missiles are spread. You shoot at his tail andyou shoot at leis head, And when it’s all over the powder is dead.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0014.xml
article
489
489,490,491,492,493,494,495,496
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ON THE TRAIE OF THE MOWITCH
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ASHLEY A. HAINES
[Note.—The incidents related here under the above title are a few of the many experiences of a very common man, and a few of his friends, while followingthe trail of the mowitch. The incidents mentioned are seldom related in the order in which they occurred—days, weeks, months, and, in some instances, years intervening; nor have all these (to the writer, at least) interesting experiences occurred in the same locality.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0015.xml
article
497
497,498,499,500,501,502,503,504,505,506,507,508,509,510,511,512
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THE WRECK OF THE FARALLON
PART II—CONCLUSION
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JOHN E. THWAITES
Chapter I of this story, puhlished in our last number, related how this steamer Farallen, which had been sent to relieve for a mon th the S. S. Dora, with a strange crew, had become lost and gronubed on the rocks of the Alaskan coast in January; how the passengers and crew, illy prepared for faeing zero weather in the open, had been compelled to abadon the ship and effect a landing on the rock and ice-ribbed coast, there to remain until assistance came.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0016.xml
article
513
513,514,515,516,517,518,519,520,521,522,523,524
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THE LOG OF THE “OUTDOOR LIFE”
The intrepid representative of this magazine begins the story of his thrilling journey to Nome, Alaska, via the “Inside Passage” and the Yukon River in a 25-foot motor boat.
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J. A. RICKER
Our trip to Alaska in a motor boat was planned at Newport Beach, California, where the water craft consists principally of gasoline launches which although generally seaworthy would never be entrusted to a trip of such length by their owners.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0017.xml
article
525
525,526
IN THE GAME FIELD
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The Use of Dogs on Game
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In our July issue we wrote an article entitled “Should We Stop the Running of Predatory Animals With Dogs?” in which we asked for the opinions of those having views on both sides of this question. The subject has shown a surprising evolution, as our readers who have replied have mostly digressed from the original question to that of running deer with dogs.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0018.xml
article
526
526,527
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Doesn’t Believe in Hunting Deer With Hounds.
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Editor Outdoor Life
I see in the August issue of Outdoor Life on page 199 an article by J. E. Williams on “Running Dogs on Game vs. Still Hunting,” and while I agree with him in that every man has as much right to his own views as another, I disagree with him as to the effects of the two methods of hunting.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0019.xml
article
527
527
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Believes That With the Dog Stopped the Bag Will Control Itself.
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Editor Outdoor Life
When the question came up last month in regard to the running of predatory animals with dogs I began to look forward with anticipation, hoping there might be many who would give their, views upon the subject, as it is one deserving of much consideration, but I see there is only one contribution in the August number on this subject, and it is scarcely worthy the consideration of a sportsman.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0020.xml
article
527
527,528
IN THE GAME FIELD
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An Old Hunter Draws Conclusions.
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Editor Outdoor Life
This is my answer to J. E. Williams as to the use of hounds in deer hunting: In Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota the use of hounds makes the getting of deer much easier than srill hunting, as the deer takes to the water as soon as the dogs get close to them, and can be killed with a club by a man in a boat; so the sportsmen had a law passed to keep the farmers from hounding the deer.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0021.xml
article
528
528
IN THE GAME FIELD
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A Practical Sportsman’s Views.
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Editor Outdoor Life
Here is my stand in regard to hounding, voiced by hundreds of the “Nation of the Lakotah”: He who goes after deer or elk armed with his gun, still-hunting, pits his sagacity against that of the game hunted; while he who issues forth with a pack of hounds to take the place of his brains in the hunt, while he stands on a runway or shore of a lake, awaiting the breaking into view of the quarry, at once condemns himself for the want of that quality that makes for a true sportsman.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0022.xml
article
528
528
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Fantailed Deer at Present Existent
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Editor Outdoor Life
I received your letter in reply to my reference to fan-tailed deer in the Black Hills. I have killed them myself and I am sure that anyone who lives in or around the Black Hills knows what a fan-tailed deer is—that is, anyone who hunts deer. They are small and seldom weigh over 100 pounds, have small horns and the tail is large for their size.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0023.xml
article
528
528,529
IN THE GAME FIELD
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The Danger of Wild Animals
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Editor Outdoor Life
I note in the September number of Outdoor Life that our friend, C. L. Chamberlin, has taken a most interesting subject in discussing the ferocity of wild animals. At his invitation to extend the subject I will devote a brief space to a few personal views.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0024.xml
article
529
529,530
IN THE GAME FIELD
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The Weight of Dr. Anderson's Big Bear
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Editor Outdoor Life
How did Dr. J. Wylie Anderson, who killed the big bear on Unimak Island, Alaska, recorded in Outdoor Life for December, 1909, arrive at the weight of his bear? HERBERT LEE. Alaska. In answering the above question we can do no better than refer to a letter written by Dr. Anderson and dated Dec. 18, 19U9, covering this subject, which we append—this letter having been written to Dr. W. T. Hornaday of New York in answer to a question on the weight of this bear:
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0025.xml
article
530
530
IN THE GAME FIELD
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What’s the Use?
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Editor Outdoor Life
Glance over the enclosed clipping from the Herald of Yakima, Wash. Is it any wonder that real “nature fakirs” are hourly bred in the land when such ignorance as this is rampant? I can imagine the surprise of some of America’s big game hunters on learning of the existence of 14-foot cougars—and cougars of such prodigious strength! No doubt the reading of this article has produced the proper thrill and blood-curdling sensation among a few women, children, “tenderfeet” and the uninitiated generally.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0026.xml
article
530
530,531
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Texas White-tails For Breakfast
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Editor Outdoor Life
Pete and I had planned to celebrate the opening of the deer season by giving them an early morning round. Long before daylight we were aroused from our sleep by the coyotes giving tongue to a jackrabbit in the truck patch close to the house.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0027.xml
article
531
531
IN THE GAME FIELD
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Game Notes
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The following is an extract from a letter received lately from Frank A. McMillan of Sturgis, S. D.: “1 am sending you herewith some pictures of game that 1 thought you might be interested in, all taken last November about six miles south of here, where we take our annual hunt every fall. Deer are very plentiful and a good hunter can bag his limit fàirly easy.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0028.xml
article
532
532,533,534
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The Long Shooters; and the Origin of 300-Yards Revolver Shooting
I. SOME POPULAR IDEAS PROVE ERRONEOUS.
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Wm. Brent Altsheler
My earliest impression of the revolver came near ending in a tragedy. My father owned a blacksmith shop, which was a favorite haunt of mine. The feats of human strength in shoeing wild horses fascinated me. The son of the blacksmith was the best shot in the country around.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0029.xml
article
534
534,535,536,537,538
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Bolt Action Rifle Speed Possibilities
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Chas. Newton
In the July 6th, 1911, issue of Arms and The Man, appeared an article under the above caption, which article consisted in part of a report by Lieut. Whelen of four tests made by him in shooting a Krag rifle with a view to ascertaining the least time in which five shots could be discharged with a semblance of aim, apparently tnat its speed of manipulation might be compared with that of a lever action rifle; and in part of a letter from Mr. Crossman of Los Angeles, introducing the lieutenant to the shooting fraternity, commenting upon the almost unbelievable speed attained, and closing with “Now cometh the lever action champion—maybe.”
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0030.xml
article
538
538,539,540,541,542,543
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The Other View of 300 Yards Revolver Shooting
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N. H. Roberts
When the first article by Mr. Brent Altsheler, on the Turkey Shoot in Pewee Valley, Ky., appeared in Outdoor Life, I read it very carefully, then re-read it several times, and concluded if the report as published was really true, it was simply the result of luck or chance, and ought not to have been published in the way that would lead one to suppose that the performance could be duplicated by any one, at any old time, under any conditions.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0031.xml
article
543
543
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Lightweight Shotguns
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Editor Outdoor Life
For some time a discussion has been carried on in most of the sporting papers on the comparative values of small and large-bore guns, and usually accompanying it, light and heavyweights. Eike all questions largely of opinion, there can be no decision reached to which all will agree.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0032.xml
article
543
543,544
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Comments on Topics of Rifle Interest
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Editor Outdoor Life
I am particularly writing about “Shooting Up the Bolt Action Camp," by Mr. Haines. He has given us something to read about, think about and talk about. I am a thirty-third degree bolt-action crank, toddling along in the tracks of my esteemed superiors, Lieut. Whelen, et al., and I expect so to continue; but I am free to say that Brother Haines has stirred us up to the very depths of our vitals; his arguments will be hard to beat, and I can fancy Crossman and Wheien even now getting on their war paint, drawing in their belts to the last buckle hole, with an energy and concentration that would even cause the great T. R. to pause and note.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0033.xml
article
544
544
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Mr. Watson Invents a Reloader
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Editor Outdoor Life
I send a cut of my Improved Ballard reloader. I find it a great improvement on either of the Winchester reloaders of heavy cartridges. It is light and very powerful, and very speedy. It seats the bullets exactly alike every time. The shell cannot be buckled, as it is home before there is any force applied to seat the bullet.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0034.xml
article
544
544,545
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Belt Revolvers
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Editor Outdoor Life
Receiving a short time ago a lot of magazines, with the back numbers, in very poor condition, I hope you will allow me to thank you for the fine shape in which the Outdoor Life came, and to us, who are on the “outside of things” (1,000 miles beyond Manila) is certainly appreciated.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0035.xml
article
545
545
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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How About This?
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Editor Outdoor Life
As there are a great many automatic pistols on the market, and as the U. S. Government has adopted them, it would seem to be of great assistance to automatic pistol users to have a .22 caliber with which to practice. I am an admirer and user of the Savage automatic pistol, and think an extra .22 caliber barrel, firing pin, extractor, light retractor spring and magazine would give the shooter of a Savage auto pistol a chance to become an expert shot.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0036.xml
article
545
545
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Likes the .25-32 Remington Autoloader
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Editor Outdoor Life
In answer to C. M. Tinsman’s query, July issue, regarding the use of the automatic for deer, bear and lion, I would like to say that I have used a Remington .25-35 Automatic for the last two years and have never had it stick with me or give the slightest trouble.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0037.xml
article
545
545,546
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Differs From Dr. Connyngham.
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Editor Outdoor Life
A statement was made in the July number of Outdoor Life by Dr. E. E. Connyngham that the Ross .28 high-power rifle is worthless as a broadside shooter at sixty yards, but an A-1 rifle at 300 to 400 yards. Now is this true, and if so, why? I, for one, think the doctor is mistaken. Does he think the bullet would go through the animal so quickly that it would not have time to expand, and thus slip through the tissues and do no material injury?
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0038.xml
article
546
546
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Rather Inconsistent
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Editor Outdoor Life
This is a good joke on the bowman. It suggests the story of the man on the corner preaching prohibition, when the bottle fell out of his pocket and broke his argument. Kentucky. BRENT ARTSHERER. PISTOR BARR HITS ARCHER. Seattle, Wash., .Tulv 19.—Will H. Thompson, poet and former chamnion archer of the United States, who went North recently on a bow-and-arrow hunting expedition with three companions, was shot accidently through the forearm three days ago near his camp on Jarvis Inlet, B. C., and came to Seattle today.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0039.xml
article
546
546
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Concerning Bullets
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Editor Outdoor Life
I have followed the articles on bullets in the late numbers of Outdoor Life with a great deal of interest. I believe the .375-40-270 cartridge, as listed by Westly Richards, is about equal to the conditions imposed by Dr. Connyngham. in regard to the cartridge.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0040.xml
article
546
546,547
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The 20-Gauge Automatic
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Editor Outdoor Life
The 20-gauge automatic shotgun must come. Were you using daily a 30-horse-power roadster automobile, how would you like the idea of discarding it for our Mexico burro? That’s just my feeling when I think of putting aside my automatic Remington for the ordinary 20gauge double-barrel of today, and still I am sure the small, lightweight shotgun is the gun for all ordinary hunting in the United States.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0041.xml
article
547
547
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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.22 Caliber Twists.
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Editor Outdoor Life
The accompanying diagram of targets made with the Peters’ .22 short and Peters’ .22 Stevens-Pope cartridges in the same rifle and under identical conditions will prove instructive to many. It only goes to prove that a given twist of rifling will handle to best advantage but one length of bullet.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0042.xml
article
547
547
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Likes the Savage and S. & W.
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Editor Outdoor Life
It's a serious moment when a man has to draw a gun with which to protect his life or property, but at such a time he should have the best that can be had. Of course we all have our favorites. Mine is a .44 S. & W. with short barrel and a Savage automatic that I shoot for the pure love of it when I get the chance.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0043.xml
article
547
547
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The 20-Gauge at Last
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Editor Outdoor Life
The Union Fire Arms Company. Toledo, Ohio, are putting a 20-gauge repeating shot gun on the market closely resembling their 12-gauge. Haven’t seen the gun as yet, nor do I know the price; neither do I know what the Union gun will do, but it’s easy to predict what the larger companies will do.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0044.xml
article
547
547,548
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Effect of Hollow .22s
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Editor Outdoor Life
Having tried out the hollow-point .22 caliber cartridge on game, will pass my experience along. However, will state was rather skeptical as to the accuracy of this ammunition before giving it a trial. Oregon is pested with gray digger squirrels, and being about the size of a half-grown house cat, are bad actors and hard to kill and get them before they get into their hole. I have used all kinds of .22 calibre cartridges, but as a clean killer the hollow point is the climax of them all.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0045.xml
article
548
548
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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A Machine Bolt Action .22 Sporting Rifle
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Editor Outdoor Life
I have been particularly interested in what Mr. C. L. Gilman has to say in the September issue of Outdoor Life respecting a magazine boltaction .22 caliber snorting rifle, as it is a type of small-bore rifle which I advocated some years ago.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0046.xml
article
548
548,549
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The New Spvinpfield and .351 Winchester
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Chas. B. Gordon
I have been reading the articles concerning the Snringfield service rifle, which have been published in your magazine with considerable interest, and wish to state the extent of observations I have made of same. I have recently qualified as an expert under the National Rifle Association’s requirements.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0047.xml
article
549
549,550
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Mr. Pettit’s Opinion
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Editor Outdoor Life
Am enclosing for your inspection a sample of the artistic aerial pistol work being done by Mr. Gus Peret, the crack pistol and rifle shot and clever demonstrator for the Peters Cartridge Company. This was done over at Nyssa, Ore., last spring with the .38 special “Haines Model” “built up” six-shooter, cuts of which and write-up appeared last spring in Outdoor Life over Mr. Peret's signature.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0048.xml
article
550
550,551
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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The New .22 Caliber Savage High Power
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At last it has arrived. After two years of waiting the writer is able to answer the hundreds of people who have written him regarding the forthcoming new .22 caliber high-power rifle, with the statement that it is being manufactured by the Savage Arms Company of Utica, New York, in their well-known featherweight model with the revolving magazine and lever action.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0049.xml
article
551
551,552
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Wanted—Simple Directions Leading to Bull’s Eye
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Editor Outdoor Life
I have always been a gun crank since sling-shot and airgun days. I have a Marlin .22 caliber, 1897 model, Marlin .32 Special and Winchester 1895 model musket for 1906 cartridge. Also a .38 Smith & Wesson hammerless and a Colt’s .45 caliber, New Service, 7½-inch barrel.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0050.xml
article
552
552
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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An Old Style Double Gun
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Editor Outdoor Life
I ran across an old gun recently that would doubtless be of interest to those interested in such things. It is an old double barrel cap gun. One barrel placed over the other, the two revolving so either may be brought on top, and are fired by the same hammer.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0051.xml
article
552
552,553
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Arms and Ammunition Queries
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Geo. C. Shumaker, Alamosa, Colo.:—I would like to have some information on the model ’73 Winchester rifle handling the .22 long cartridges. I want a lever action .22 and the only .22 lever rifle now on the market handling the .22 long rifle cartridge does not suit me.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0052.xml
article
554
554,555
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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Some New Books
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Stalks in the Himalaya, Jottings of a Sportsman-Naturalist, by E. P. Stebbing, F. R. G. S., F. Z. S., with upwards of a hundred illustrations by the author and others; $4.00 net; John Lane Co., New York. The above is the engaging title of a neatly printed and modestly bound octavo volume by E. P. Stebbing, who also wrote “Jungle Byways in India.”
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0053.xml
article
555
555
ARMS AND AMMUNITION
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LIFE.
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EFFIE McDOWELL DAVIES
When ’round yer lips the heart-sobs lurk Then whistlin’s mighty up-hill work; But try, and soon the tremble’s gone, Like darkness fadin’ into dawn. And when yer wants to growl, jest smile; The effort’s shorely worth yer while. Yer trail’s not half as steep and hard As it might be; you know that, Paid!
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0054.xml
article
556
556,557,558,559,560,561,562
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INDEX
INDEX TO VOLUMES XXVII AND XXVIII (YEAR 1911).
JANUARY NUMBER.
FEBRUARY NUMBER.
MARCH NUMBER.
APRIL NUMBER.
MAY NUMBER.
JUNE NUMBER.
JULY NUMBER.
AUGUST NUMBER.
SEPTEMBER NUMBER.
OCTOMBER NUMBER.
NOVEMBER NUMBER.
DECEMBER NUMBER.
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0055.xml
article
563
563
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Grapping notes
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The fur market has opened up this season with a very strong demand for practically every kind of furs that is caught—raccoon, muskrat, mink, fisher, lynx, lynx cat, wolf and foxes; also marten, beaver, otter and skunk are in big demand. Prices of course range according to the section in which the furs are caught.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0056.xml
article
564
564
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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NOTICE.
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After the Issuance of this number the Miscellaneous Department of the magazine will be discontinued. Our reasons for taking this step have been outlined in a letter which hes been sent to all advertisers. The space given up to this department will be replaced with pure reading matter—a change that we believe will be of benefit to our advertisers and readers alike—and we hope to receive the co-operation of every member of both of these classes toward the general betterment of the magazine commencing with our January number.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0057.xml
article
564
564
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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SOME EXTRAORDINARY PISTOL SHOOTING.
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Before several members of the Manhattan Rifle and Revolver Association during the afternoon of October 7th, Mr. John A. Dietz, shooting cartridges loaded with Lesmok powder maade scores of 92, 97, 98. 99 and 100 on the Standard American target at 50 yards.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0058.xml
article
564
564
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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IMPRESSIONS OF THE NEW STEVENS H. P. RIFLE.
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We take pleasure in publishing below an extract from a contribution by Mr. Amos Burhans, which we believe will appeal to all users of high power rifles: “The first rifle I ever owned was a Stevens. The new Stevens .35 high power I have tried, and found to be more free of serious defects than any rifle that I ever carried.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0059.xml
article
564
564,565
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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RELOADING WITH CAST BULLETS.
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In order to enable the individual shooter to reload his shells without the bother of preparing his own bullets, the Marlin Firearms Co. (successors to the Ideal Mfg. Co.), have now decided to furnish any of the standard lead bullets featured in the Ideal Hand Book at prices that are very slightly above the cost of production.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0060.xml
article
565
565
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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A BOOK ON TRAP SHOOTING.
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In past Issues we have had much to say in favor of trap shooting as an outdoor pastime, but nothing we could possibly say could bring to mind in such a forceful manner the greatness of this sport as the book recently issued by the E. I. Du Pont de Nemours Powder Co., of Wilmington, Del., entitled “The Sport Alluring.”
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0061.xml
advertisement
565
565
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The Horton Mfg. Company: Bristol
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The Horton Mfg. Company
Bristol
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0062.xml
article
565
565
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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POCKET MONEY FOR FARMERS' BOYS.
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Thousands of farmers’ boys make money every winter by trapping the fur animals that are found on almost every farm in America. There are more fur-bearing animals of some kinds today than there ever were. Tt is not necessary to go to the Far North, or to suffer any hardships or run any risks in order to be a trapper.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0063.xml
article
565
565
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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VALUABLE BOOK FOR THREE CENTS IN STAMPS.
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We have received from the Harrington & Richardson Arms Co.. Worcester. Mass., a book entitled “Fifty Prize Hunting Stories.” This company recently offered a series of prizes ranging from $100 down to $5 for the best true stories of “What I Did With a Gun.”
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0064.xml
article
565
565
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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LEARN TAXIDERMY.
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Thousands of sportsmen all over America are now learning Taxidermy for themselves and this is a splendid thing for them to do, for this art goes hand in hand with sportsmanship. We would certainly recommend that our readers investigate the nossibilities of this art.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0065.xml
article
565
565,566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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NEW WESTERN RAW FUR COMPANY.
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The Denver Raw Fur Co.. 1630-32 Blake St., Denver, are making a big bid for the business of the Western trappers and sellers of raw furs. This company is composed of men who have spent many years’ service in the. raw fur business in the East, and have the name of paying the fullest values for furs.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0066.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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“THE HONEYMOON.”
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The newly-weds are each year departing more and more from the custom of going to Niagara, Washington or other resorts, and are spending their honeymoon in the wilds in camp. The Horton Mfg. Co. of Bristol, Conn., manufacturers of the famous steel fishing rods, are about to issue a new calendar which will be ready December 1st, reproduced in twelve colors from a painting by Oliver Kemp, entitled “The Honeymoon, a small cut of which is herewith reproduceu.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0067.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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“DISEASES OF THE DOG.”
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The above is the title of a booklet issued by H. Clay Glover, V. S., the most eminent man in America on the successful treatment of dog diseases. This book gives valuable advice on the various diseases to which dogs are heir, with symptoms and treatment, and can be had of Dr. Glover, 118 West 31st St., New York, by bona fide dog owners who mention this notice. Dr. Glover may be consulted by dog owners by mail without cost.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0068.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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A NEW DECOY DUCK.
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It has been a long time since duck hunters have been offered anything so novel and necessary as Johnson’s Paper Decoy Ducks, which have just been placed on the market. The decoy possesses many features that recommend it highly. Being printed from halftone plates, reproduced from mounted birds, it is lifelike.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0069.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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THE NEW IDEAL HAND BOOK IS OUT.
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In many parts of this country the “Ideal Hand Book" is regarded as religiously as the family Bible, so necessary is it for the man of moderate means in curtailing his shooting expenses. The new edition is just out and can be had by sending 6 cents in stamps (to pay postage) to the Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, Conn., and mentioning this notice.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0070.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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A RAW FUR DEALER WHO PAYS HIGHEST PRICES.
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Mr. A. B. Shubert, one of our advertisers, is quoted as saying: “The ‘know how’ of building up a list of satisfied shippers like I have, is something that money cannot buy. It is only secured by giving each and every shipper, on each and every shipment he makes, the highest market prices, an accurate and fair assortment and prompt returns, and, last but not least, you must keep him posted, and tell him the truth.”
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0071.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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BAUSCH & LOMB'S NEW PROJECTION APPARATUS CATALOG.
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We have received from Bausch & Lomb of Rochester, N. Y., their new catalog on projection apparatus. Besides valuable introductory matter in the form of general information and tables for reference purposes, they show in this catalog their complete line of Balopticons, or high grade projection lanterns, and projection accessaries.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0072.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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ERRATUM.
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We wish to correct an error that crept into the story “Barge American Deer Heads,” in our October number. Cut No. 6 is classed as a whitetail deer, whereas it was a blacktail. The error occurred in editing the copy and should not be charged to Dr. Beck, the owner of the head.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0073.xml
article
566
566
THE MONTHS MISCELLANY
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NOTES.
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Mr. C. A. Young won high general average at the Cincinnati Gun Club October 22. 95 ex 100. with Peters shells. High amateur was William Donald of Felicity, Ohio, also with Peters shells. E. C. Shabilon, taxidermist, of Orangeville. Illinois, has issued an attractive catalog showing samples of his work which he will send out on request. This booklet includes a field guide for the skinning and preserving of birds and animals.
OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0074.xml
advertisement
9a
9a
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Advertisement
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0075.xml
advertisement
10A
10A,11A,28A,29A,30A,31A,36A
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MISCELLANEOUS
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0076.xml
advertisement
12A
12A,13A,14A,15A,16A,17A,18A,19A,20A,21A
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ARMS AND HUNTING ACCESSORIES
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0077.xml
advertisement
22A
22A
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KENNEL
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0078.xml
advertisement
23A
23A,24A,25A,26A,27A
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TAXIDERMISTS AND FUR DEALERIS
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0079.xml
advertisement
32A
32A,33A,34A,35A
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0080.xml
advertisement
37A
37A
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Advertisement: Evaporated Milk
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Evaporated Milk
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0081.xml
advertisement
38A
38A
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J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL COMPANY
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J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL COMPANY
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0082.xml
advertisement
37A
37A
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Advertisement: Evaporated Milk
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Evaporated Milk
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0083.xml
advertisement
38A
38A
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Advertisement
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OutdoorLife_19111201_0028_006_0084.xml