Issue: 19940103

Monday, January 3, 1994
January
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107
Monday, April 25, 2016
6/29/2016 11:34:56 AM

Articles
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Maclean's
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0001.xml
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Mercedes-Benz
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Mercedes-Benz
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0002.xml
tableOfContents
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Maclean's
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0003.xml
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EDITORIAL
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The Mixed Mood Of ’93
FROM THE EDITOR
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When Maclean’s asked prominent Canadians for their year-end feelings about the country, Montreal brokerage executive Pierre Brunet recalled the crowds at Canada’s pavilion at the 1992 world’s fair in Seville, Spain. “Foreigners love this country,” he said.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0004.xml
masthead
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Macleans
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0005.xml
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3
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Amway
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Amway
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0006.xml
article
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4
LETTERS
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LETTERS
The straight goods
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In his article “The Ties that Bind,” (Cover, Dec. 20), J. J. Goldberg says that some major Jewish organizations are working at cross-purposes to Israeli policy, even as they proclaim their support for it. He refers to our organization, B’nai Brith Canada, and its “campaign” of support for Jewish settlers in the West Bank “whose militant opposition to the peace accord Israel’s attorney general... recently termed seditious.”
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0007.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0008.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0009.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0010.xml
article
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OPENING NOTES
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The Wide World of Weird
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After a year like 1993, it’s time to stop, take a breath, and remember the weirdness that defines life in the Nineties. Once again, Maclean’s editors have scoured the globe for 1993’s gaffes and oddballs, the telling and the truly trivial, to commemorate a year that, if nothing else, has the virtue of being over.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0011.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0012.xml
article
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PASSAGES
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PASSAGES
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MARRIED: Real estate magnate Donald Trump, 47, and Marla Maples, 29, a model and mother of the couple’s 9-week-old daughter, Tiffany, at a lavish ceremony at Trump’s Plaza Hotel in New York City. Trump, who has three children from his first marriage to Ivana Trump, 44, proposed to Maples only eight days before the ceremony.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0013.xml
article
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8,9,10,11
OPENING NOTES
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HOW WE DIFFER
MACLEAN’S/CTV POLL
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ROSS LAVER
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0014.xml
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12,13,14,15
OPENING NOTES
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A NATIONAL MIRROR
New Brunswickers are among the most devout, while Quebecers like to live for the moment
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VALUES The tum-of-the-century American author Elbert Hubbard once wrote: “Morality is largely a matter of geography.” If the Maclean’s/CTV poll is any indication, the years have done nothing to erode the truth of those words. While the survey does reveal some common national values, there is a large number of significant demographic—and geographic—differences.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0015.xml
article
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14,15
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How we see ourselves
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Dull, reserved and modest—Canadians have always used words like that to define themselves. But when respondents to the Maclean’s/CTV poll were given a list of attributes and asked which province’s residents they best described, they generally chose the most flattering adjectives for themselves.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0016.xml
article
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15
How we see ourselves
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How we see others
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Canadians have always rooted for the underdog, so it comes as little surprise that respondents in the Maclean’s/CTV poll generally viewed residents of the less populous provinces in a favorable light. They reserved their harshest assessments almost exclusively for the four wealthiest provinces—Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and Alberta.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0017.xml
article
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16,17
How we see ourselves
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STATE OF DISGRACE
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When the House of Commons last sat, on June 16, Brian Mulroney was still prime minister, Kim Campbell had just been chosen to be his successor as Conservative leader, and one of the few federal Liberals unfazed by the prospect of campaigning against her was Jean Chrétien.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0018.xml
article
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18,19
How we see ourselves
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MY CANADA INCLUDES...
Spectacular sunsets, goofy clothes and great tasting chicken ballsall that and so much more
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At a time of regional discord, what does it mean to be Canadian? Some of the country’s best-known individuals explain to Associate Editor Diane Brady what Canada means to them: PIERRE BRUNET, president of the Montreal brokerage firm Lévesque Beaubien Geoffrion.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0019.xml
article
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20,21
How we see ourselves
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CANADA UNDER THE COVER
In matters of sex, the poll shows Quebec and Newfoundland come out on top
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There is no room in Canadian society for legal prostitution, says Peggy Guthrie, a 39-year-old homemaker and mother of three from Swift Current, Sask., and precious little for explicit pornography, either. Guthrie, one of the 1,610 Canadians interviewed for this year’s Maclean’s/CTV poll, considers it wrong to have sexual relationships before marriage, and she that married men who watch sexually explicit films without their wives are engaging in a form of adultery.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0020.xml
article
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22,23
How we see ourselves
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NO PLACE LIKE HOME
There’s nothing like living abroad to give a Canadian a new perspective on the country. Here, three Maclean’s correspondents describe how Canada looks from afar
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Get a grip, Canada! You are not the hapless collection of wanna-be Americans that some would have you believe. Viewed from the distance of the east Texas prairie, where they grow real Americans, Canada shines out as a paragon of civility and common sense.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0021.xml
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24,25
How we see ourselves
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THE NATION'S PULSE
In 1984, the first Maclean’s year-end poll found that Canadians were proud and optimistic about the future. Who says nothing ever changes?
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ROBERT MARSHALL
It is still the economy, stupid. In 1984, as Maclean’s launched its annual poll to take the pulse of the nation, a post-recession economy and the associated high unemployment dominated Canadians’ thoughts. In 1992, as the devastating effects of the next global recession dominated the U.S. presidential elections, a note to campaign staffers by one of Bill Clinton’s campaign aides—“It’s the economy, stupid”—instantly resounded in Canada.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0022.xml
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26
How we see ourselves
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FRANKLY SPEAKING
Right from the first poll, it was clear Canadians answer anything’
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Most years, after peppering respondents with questions on such weighty matters as the Constitution and the deficit, the Maclean’s poll turned to sex for variety. In the beginning, it was an expedition into virgin territory—no pollster had asked Canadians about their sex lives before.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0023.xml
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SAAB
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SAAB
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0024.xml
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28,29,30
How we see ourselves
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FROM HOPE TO DEFIANCE
Over the past decade, we have lost faith in the touchstones that once guided Canadian society
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Peter C. Newman
Once or twice in the average century, like a hurricane that eludes the meteorologists’ charts, history unexpectedly accelerates and blows away the touchstones by which people live. That’s exactly what happened to Canadians between 1984 and 1994.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0025.xml
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Canadian Club
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Canadian Club
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0026.xml
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32,33,34
How we see ourselves
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PRIDE AND PESSIMISM
Patriotism aside, many respondents say Canada is now a worse place to live
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Results of the Maclean’s/CTY poll by Decima Research are based on telephone interviews with 1,610 Canadian residents, 18 years of age or older, selected randomly across all 10 provinces. Supervised by Decima vice-president Christopher Kelly, the survey was conducted from Nov.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0027.xml
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Florida Tourism
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Florida Tourism
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0028.xml
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36,37
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CHRYSLER: MAGIC WAGON
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CHRYSLER
MAGIC WAGON
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0029.xml
article
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38,39
CANADA
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PRICE FIGHTER
JOHN CROW LEAVES THE RANK OF CANADA BUT HIS SUCCESSOR VOWS TO KEEP A HARD LINE IN THE FIGHT AGAINST INFLATION
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Canadians have been carrying Gordon Thiessen’s name around in their wallets and purses for years— without ever knowing it. Since 1988, the year after he became senior deputy governor of the Bank of Canada, Thiessen’s stylish signature has adorned the lower left corner of the country’s paper money.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0030.xml
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CANADA
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Canada Notes
AN AMBITIOUS AGENDA
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Canada’s premiers left their first meeting with Prime Minister Jean Chrétien in Ottawa in an upbeat mood, pledging greater co-operation on a wide range of issues. Among other things, the first ministers agreed to: a formula to jointly finance a two-year, $6-billion infrastructure progam that they said could create 65,000 jobs; reach a five-year deal on transfer payments to the provinces by the spring; eliminate interprovincial trade barriers by June; replace the federal Goods and Services Tax and end duplication of tax collecting by Ottawa and the provinces as quickly as possible.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0031.xml
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40,41
CANADA
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'YOU HAVE TO KNOW THERE IS A FUTURE'
In a conversation, Jean Chrétien says he wants to make Canadians feel good about their country and themselves
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0032.xml
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42,43
WORLD
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A CHANGE OF HEART?
THE IRA CONSIDERS A FRAMEWORK FOR PEACE IN ULSTER
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Rev. Gerry Reynolds had a Christmas message for his Roman Catholic parishioners in Belfast’s terror-infested working-class neighborhoods: beware the sin of slothfulness. With Northern Ireland teetering between peace and yet more war, indifference towards the latest proposal for ending the sectarian conflict could indeed have deadly results.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0033.xml
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WORLD
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World Notes
YELTSIN DISBANDS KGB
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Russian President Boris Yeltsin issued a decree abolishing the security ministry, the former KGB secret police, and replacing it with a new federal counter-intelligence service. The security ministry has been criticized for failing to predict the stunning success of ultranationalist leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky’s party in Dec. 12 parliamentary elections, as well as for its passivity during an armed revolt by hardline legislators in October.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0034.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0035.xml
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Ontario Hydro
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Ontario Hydro
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0036.xml
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46,47,48,50
BUSINESS
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A YEAR OF MODEST GROWTH
A PANEL OF ECONOMIC EXPERTS EXAMINES THE OUTLOOK FOR CANADA IN 1994
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JOHN DALY
Forecasting any phenomenon a year in advance is a risky proposition at best. Last January, psychics interviewed by the National Enquirer supermarket tabloid predicted that singer Kathy Lee Gifford would replace Jay Leno as the host of The Tonight Show, and that the Hubble telescope orbiting the Earth would discover evidence of alien beings living on a large asteroid.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0037.xml
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BUSINESS
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Business Notes
PWA REJECTS AIR CANADA OFFER
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Calgary-based PWA Corp., the parent company of Canadian Airlines International Ltd., rejected a $250-million offer from Air Canada for Canadian’s international routes. Instead, PWA executives sought to close a deal whereby the Texas-based parent of American Airlines, AMR Corp., would acquire a 25-per-cent stake in Canadian for $246 million.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0038.xml
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Advertisements
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McGill
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0039.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0040.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0041.xml
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DATAGROUP
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DATAGROUP
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0042.xml
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52
THE NATION’S BUSINESS
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Prediction for 1994: Canadian neo-punks
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Peter C. Newman
The healthiest legacy of the Great Recession is that it brought Canadians face-to-face with the uncomfortable realization that the old approaches to jobs and life don’t work any more. Having been unable to resolve our collective self-doubts, instead of continuing the search for a national identity, Canadians have become determined to live their separate ones.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0043.xml
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0044.xml
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COMPAQ
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COMPAQ
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0045.xml
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LIFESTYLES
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At home alone: a new way of life
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Before separating from his wife 10 years ago, Rick Hetherington did not welcome the prospect of living alone. And even now, Hetherington, who moved to Winnipeg a year ago and maintains a long-distance relationship with a woman who still lives in Toronto, admits that “there is no question it is lonely at times.”
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0046.xml
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58,59
THE ARTS
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All the rage in ’93
In case you missed them first time around—a reminder of the year’s gems
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Compiling best-of lists can be an exercise in frustration—so many items from which to choose, so few spots in each category. Undaunted, Maclean’s entertainment section editors and critics offer their personal choices of 1993 highlights: Films 1. The Piano. Jane Campion’s sexual, gothic tale of 19th-century innocents in the New Zealand bush is enchanting, original and note-perfect.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0047.xml
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60,61
BOOKS
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The northern muse
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John Bemrose
American novelists William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway and Willa Cather had at least one thing in common: they all thought highly of Canada. “I like Canadians,” Hemingway enthused in a wryly affectionate poem he wrote for the Toronto Daily Star, where he was a reporter in the early 1920s.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0048.xml
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60,61
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TOSHIBA
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TOSHIBA
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0049.xml
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TELEVISION
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Reckless disregard
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J. L. GRANATSTEIN
Dieppe sits like a scab on the Canadian conscience. We pick at it constantly, never permitting the wound to heal. If it ever does, the scar will remain forever—and so it should. Of the 4,963 men of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division who set out for the French seaside resort on Aug. 19, 1942, along with a handful of Americans and several hundred British commandos, 3,367 were killed, wounded or captured.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0050.xml
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BRITISH AIRWAYS
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BRITISH AIRWAYS
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0051.xml
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COLUMN
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The new year’s duels and fools
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Allan Fotheringham
The mist begins to clear. Things come into focus. Reality checks in. The fog disappears from the crystal ball and there it is—1994—all the details before us. As Parliament opens on Jan. 17, Parson Manning in his pickup truck will pull up to the Peace Tower, disgorging from the back a clutch of Reformers in their bib overalls, their shoes newly shined and their bellies full of pork rinds.
Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0052.xml
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65
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RPS
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RPS
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0053.xml
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66
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SMIRNOFF
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SMIRNOFF
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Maclean's_19940103_0107_001_0054.xml