Issue: 19510101

Monday, January 1, 1951
January
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64
Friday, July 1, 2016

Articles
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MACLEAN'S
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0001.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0002.xml
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EDITORIAL
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Do We Need A New Word For Peace?
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A FEW WEEKS ago the Social Service Council of the Church of England in Canada ran head on into one of the most lunatic and ominous paradoxes of our times. The council wished to say something favorable and effective about peace. It found the task too great.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0003.xml
masthead
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MACLEAN’S
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0004.xml
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CONTENTS
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0005.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0006.xml
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2,36,37
LONDON LETTER
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TIARAS IN THE MORNING
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Beverley Baxter
SHAKESPEARE, who left, almost nothing unsaid, declared that some are born great, some achieve greatness and some have greatness thrust upon them. After the experiences of this morning I can modestly claim that whether or not I was born to greatness I have at last had it thrust upon me.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0007.xml
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3,39
BACKSTAGE IN KOREA
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Was the Tibet Invasion Our Fault?
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BLAIR FRASER
CANADIAN officers quartered at Pusan are thinking seriously of laying a complaint with the Canadian Medical Association against one Canadian doctor. Here’s the story as they tell it: A few days before my visit one of their men got a letter from his wife’s doctor.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0008.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0009.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0010.xml
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Articles
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Are We Heading For A 20-Cent Dollar?
Kicked around by economists, consumers and the Kremlin, our inflated dollar is a danger to our democracy. Here’s a revealing summary of the errors and intrigues which caused our No. 1 domestic headache — and what we can do to check it
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BRUCE HUTCHISON
EVERY Canadian family talks wistfully of the 1939 dollar, wondering when it will return. We might as well discuss the return of the dinosaur, the dodo and the bison. The 1939 dollar has gone forever. The only practical question today is whether the dollar—now worth less than 60 cents in 1939 terms —is to shrink still farther, whether in a few years we shall have a 40-cent, a 20-cent or a 10-cent dollar.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0011.xml
article
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6,7,46
Articles
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Here’s What’s Happened to Your Buck
Through the maze of inflation theory conies the unpalatable fact that Canada’s dollar is now worth 58 cents, compared with its 1939 value. Even so, most of us are living much better than we did before World War II
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SIDNEY MARGOLIUS
TO MOST Canadians the uneasy mysteries of inflation boil down to five words: “What’s it doing to me?” Only for the minorities is the answer either drastic or dramatic. For one minority—pensioners and people living on their savings—the 10-year jag oi the dollar bill has been a cruel tragedy.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0012.xml
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8,9,38
Articles
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WIN OR LOSE, THE RUSSIANS MAY GET KOREA
Even as parts of the cold, unfriendly country changed hands for the third time it was obvious that one thing wouldn’t change in Korea: Its people didn’t like Syngman Rhee’s police rule much better than they liked the Reds
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BLAIR FRASER
BEHIND the Australian war correspondent’s camp north of Sinanju stood an empty Korean farmhouse. It was quite undamaged, but for some reason the owners had moved out. The reporters preferred to sleep in tents because the house was full of fleas.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0013.xml
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10,11,40
Articles
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IT’S A TOUGH TIME TO BE A KID
Never before have two generations been so divided. Our teen-agers, caught in a whirl of fast and complex living, rebel against the dictums of an adult world. This frank and searching report shows how this family crisis affects the lives of most Canadians
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SIDNEY KATZ
IN MY trip across Canada to investigate the problems of Canadian adolescents nothing stood out more sharply than the growing conflict between teen-agers and their parents. This breach between father and son, mother and daughter, often finds the teen-ager groping in an adult world, cut ou from the benefits of parents’ advice and experience.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0014.xml
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These Things Break the Family Circle
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0015.xml
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Their World and Wants Are Different
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0016.xml
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12,13,29,30
Articles
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The Genius We Laughed At
She labeled herself a failure, this strange turbulent woman who painted what the forest told her. She burned many of her canvases and ran a chaotic boardinghouse. But Emily Carr is now acclaimed as one of Canada’s greatest artists
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J. K. NESBITT
SHE was a stocky thickset woman, and when she walked the streets of Victoria’s James Bay district, a rabble of dogs and cats at her heels, a monkey or a white rat on her shoulder and pushing a baby buggy full of groceries, the neighbors used to nudge each other and say: “There goes Emily Carr.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0017.xml
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Articles
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LOOK OUT! HERE COMES THE SERGEANT-MAJOR
But he isn’t the roaring, swashbuckling, mustache-twirling tyrant of a soldier’s worst dreams. The modern regimental sergeant-major doesn’t blow his top. Yet Sam Heinrich still gets exactly what he wants from both officers and rankers
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McKENZIE PORTER
IT IS 0800 hours at Camp Borden. It is the time most Canadian veterans recall with a shudder and some with nostalgia. It is the moment when that fierce mixture of love and hate for the Army is incubated in a soldier. It is on this split, second that the first parade of the day is called to attention.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0018.xml
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Fiction
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A letter from a girl called Elsie
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JOHN WATSON
COME The IN.” door opened and the young man came slowly into the room. The doctor looked hard at him, then glanced at his appointment book. Bernard Howell. A queer fish, this one. In 20 years of practice the doctor had never run across a man so young in quite this state.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0019.xml
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18,19
Articles
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MOVIES of 1950
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CLYDE GILMOUR
THE BEST movies shown in Canada in 1950 were slightly better, in my opinion, than the best of 1949. And 1950’s worst films, by the same happy token, seemed to me somewhat less bad than their dismal precursors of a year ago. I am not yet utterly convinced of the accuracy of the industry’s current slogan, “Movies Are Better Than Ever,” but I do agree that any customer willing to “shop around” for his films has a pretty good chance of finding some worthy ones if he looks carefully.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0020.xml
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20,21,22
Articles
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He Makes the Queen's Dresses
Son of a London grocer, Hartnell started dress designing in an attic and his friends’ mothers and sisters were his first customers. Now he sets the high-fashion world on its ear with the glittering gowns he creates for royalty
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IAN McKENZIE
NOW that bomb damage has been cleared away and the tiny Regency houses have been gaily repainted and clothing coupons have gone into garbage cans with panties made from parachutes—that square mile of London known as Mayfair again hears the soft rich engine purr of Rolls Royce, Cadillac and Mercedes.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0021.xml
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23,24,33
Articles
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I TAKE MY EARS OFF AT NIGHT
This man is stone deaf.. Yet, with a gadget the size of a cigarette pack and a neat little button in his ear, he has come back from the world of eternal silence to hold down an important government job. And even better, he can tune out riveters, bores, thunder and his son’s trombone
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NORRIS HODGINS
ALMOST EVERYONE who has seen a man with one of those neat little buttons in his ear probably has wondered: How the heck does that thing work? Is it any good? Can he really hear with it? Many of the thousands of Canadians wearing hearing aids are still looked on with the same of pained curiosity that used to be reserved for old-fashioned ear trumpets which you still occasionally in comic strips.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0022.xml
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What Do You Remember of 1950?
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What Do You Remember of 1950?
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IT WAS a big year for Canada, big in events and in human interest. But how much do you remember? Test your memory with these questions— they’re mostly about people, and all Canadian. 1. “Operation M.P.” brought federal cabinet members to Ottawa by plane and car for an emergency session.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0023.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0024.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0025.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0026.xml
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How to Break Even on Christmas
On his way to the pawnshop with his tinsel-wrapped loot, Largo stops off to point out to amateurs that it's the gift, not the spirit, that counts
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JOHN LARGO
HOW did you make out at Christmas? Soon after the annual battle I interrupted my gift exchanging for the moment and dropped in on a pal of mine whom I shall call Sam. (He hates to be called Sam.) He showed me his collection of Christmas cards. He had them stacked on the mantel, the top of the radio, the sideboard, and the glass cabinet where he keeps his sea shells.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0027.xml
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In the Editors’ Confidence
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In the Editors’ Confidence
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LAST summer Maclean’s articles editor called up James Dugan, one of our New York operatives, and told him we wanted a story about the birth of a song hit. “Fine, fine,” said Dugan, humming a few bars of “White Christmas.” “Got just the number for you.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0028.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0029.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0030.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0031.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0032.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0033.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0034.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0035.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0036.xml
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Christmas Tree Discarded
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Martha Banning Thomas
This was the tree which stoutly stood Beside a winter brook. This was the tree whose living wood And branches bravely took The chilling burden of the snow, The agony of frost, Only a month of weeks ago. And now, abandoned, lost, It keeps the company of trash Discarded and unclean, And wears a tarnished tinsel sash About its docile green.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0037.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0038.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0039.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0040.xml
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JASPER
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0041.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0042.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0043.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0044.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0045.xml
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Poor Harmony
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Ray Romine
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0046.xml
article
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The Goldener Rule
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Seymour Kapetansky.
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0047.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0048.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0049.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0050.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0051.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0052.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0053.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0054.xml
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MAILBAG
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Thinks McManus Exposá Should be in Pamphlet
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The exposé by T.G. McManus (“The Reds Are Ready to Wage War Inside Canada,” Nov. 15) a ten-strike. Suggest you reprint in pamphlet form. —Ed. Orpen, Toronto. • McManus claims that he left the Communist Party of Canada some four months ago—has he? There have been so many meaningless exposures of the Communist Party in the past that the situation has become like that of the story of the boy who cried “wolf” so often that when the proper time came to call “wolf” all ears were deat to the cry.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0055.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0056.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0057.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0058.xml
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PARADE
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THE GRIN AND BARE IT SECTION
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IT WAS in the confectionery corner of a Toronto department store one day during the Christmas madness that a particularly harassed -looking woman shopper, hat slightly askew, was seen tapping a 50-cent piece angrily on the glass counter and heard shouting in shrill tones, “Who waits on the nuts?” The Calgary motorist had just been chilled by the sound of a motor cycle cop’s siren, had pulled over to the side of the road, had submitted silently to a dressing down and a speeding ticket, and had just got under way again when the siren’s wail pierced his soul a second time.
Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0059.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0060.xml
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Maclean's_19510101_0064_001_0061.xml