Issue: 19480801

Sunday, August 1, 1948
August
15
True
61
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
6/29/2016 1:26:58 PM

Articles
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MACLEAN'S
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EDITORIALS
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Is the CCF Winning By Default?
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OLD-LINE politicians are talking too much, and doing too little, about the recent victories of the CCF. To listen to some of them, you’d think the election returns of the past two months were a personal triumph for Uncle Joe Stalin. This is not only rubbish, it’s the blindest kind of buck passing.
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MACLEAN’S
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CONTENTS
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IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE
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IN THE EDITORS’ CONFIDENCE
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TO OBTAIN two of the articles in this issue, Blair Fraser and Pierre Berton traveled 16,000 miles, much of it through fire, flood and political oratory, and except for a slight tendency on the part of Mr. Berton to vibrate like a tuning fork every time he sees an automobile or an airplane, both operatives appear to have cooled out fit and happy.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0008.xml
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5,6,53,55
General Articles
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PINK HOME IN THE WEST
After four years of Socialist Government and four more ahead, how Socialist is Saskatchewan?
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BLAIR FRASER
ON JUNE 24 the Government of Saskatchewan, the only CCF Government ever to hold office, was returned to power. It was the first time in Saskatchewan’s 43 years as a province that a non-Liberal government had won a second term. Liberals had been beaten once before, but when the Conservatives went to the people after their first term, they didn’t win a single seat.
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6,36,37
General Articles
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Down in Mabel’s Room
From her basement lair in the Chateau Laurier, Mabel Egan rules over room service with a mighty memory, an eagle eye
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THELMA LeCOCQ
AROUND the Chateau Laurier in Ottawa, Mabel Egan is known as “the woman who knows a million men but never sees any of them.” This description of herself is one that pleases Mrs. Egan. As head of room service in the Chateau for 25 years, she has made a career of remembering names and voices, of tagging them with bacon crisp or medium, steaks rare or welldone.
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7,31,32,33,34
General Articles
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DON’T PANIC OVER POLIO
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CHARLES NEVILLE
THOUSANDS of parents this month will lose weight, sleep and peace of mind worrying about a disease which kills far fewer Canadian children each year than the common whooping cough. Poliomyelitis, the mysterious childhood crippler which more frequently maims than it kills, reaches its seasonal peak during the hot, humid days of midand late summer.
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8,9,26,28,29a,29b,30,31
Fiction
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If It's a House You Want
They had to have a home so they could get married and the coach house looked wonderful. But how about the captain who was tougher than Bligh?
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CARL DREHER
IT WAS after five when the car ground to a squealing stop in the driveway. After a moment a door slammed. Thomas Barlow, realtor and insurance agent, shoved back his desk chair and looked into the anteroom. A tall young man was standing there uncertainly.
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10,41,42
General Articles
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U.S.A.-THE GIANT WITH A SECRET SOUL
When the European is urged to adopt the American way of life he’s baffled. Just what is it? Even the Yanks can’t tell him
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ALAN MOOREHEAD
I HAD not been in the United States very long before I began to realize that, however else they might conflict in their opinions, the majority of Americans were absolutely convinced that their way of life was the best way, the only way; any foreign nation which was offered a chance of taking a share of the American way of life, of embracing American policy as well as American dollars, could not possibly hesitate.
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11,46,47
General Articles
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Public Phony Number One
Canada’s most famous yegg regards himself as a daring glamour guy. To the cops he’s a cowardly bum who can’t stay out of jail
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ROSS GREGORY
ON THE rainwashed façade of every police station in the land there hangs the portrait of a man whose life has been as tattered and as yellow as the fraying poster that bears his likeness. It is the portrait of a myth, of a man whose whole career was such a failure that he wasn’t even a success as a cheap crook, a man who is even a washout as Canada’s Public Enemy Number One.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0016.xml
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12,41
Fiction
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The Human Factor
The professor’s absent-mindedness was merely amusing — until someone murdered his wife
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PHYLLIS LEE PETERSON
PROFESSOR Willoughby made his uncertain way through the library and stood diffidently before Miss Thomas’ desk. He fumbled in his vest pocket for the fountain pen that never had any ink in it and waited with a vague, preoccupied air for the librarian to notice him.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0017.xml
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13,43,44,45
General Articles
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LET’S DRIVE TO ALASKA
The Alaska Highway is now open to tourists. They’ll find crazy rivers, covered wagons, six-bit beer and 1,500 miles of scenery
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PIERRE BERTON
THE LONG, lonely road to the North starts off in the flat little farming community of Dawson Creek, B.C., where the prairie meets the frontier, where the barns are built of polished brown logs and the benchland along the broad Peace River is a rich checkerboard of green and chocolate.
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14,52
General Articles
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Washington Memo
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ERNEST K. LINDLEY
THE Republican national convention this year was the first, of either party to be extensively televised. It is plain that this relatively new medium will have an influence on politics and candidates just as radio has had. The first national convention to be broadcast was the Democratic convention of 1924, held in the old Madison Square Garden in New York.
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14,38
General Articles
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Creeping Common Sense
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IF YOU had been in the gallery of the House of Commons when Sir Stafford Cripps brought in his Budget last April you would have seen, sitting to the right of the Chancelor on the Government front bench, two men in morning dress wearing top hats.
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15,52
General Articles
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BACKSTAGE AT OTTAWA
How (gulp) to Pick a Leader
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THE MAN WITH A NOTEBOOK
IN BOTH the older parties these days, all the talk is about new leadership. The Liberals' problem is out in the open and relatively simple. Since J. L. Ilsley's retirement, the number one candidate is Louis S. St. Laurent. Had Mr. Ilsley consented to run, he could probably have carried the Liberal convention.
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16,17,24,25,26
General Articles
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Step Up and Meet Minnie the Mummy
Half a million folks a year spin the turnstiles of the Royal Ontario Museum to see the oldest show on earth
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C. FRED BODSWORTH
RECENTLY a blanched, trembling man strode into the office of Stuart C. Downing, mammalogist at the Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology in Toronto, and tossed a small roll of paper table napkin on Downing’s desk. “Open it!” he exclaimed. “Cat rib, that’s what it is. In a sausage I just ate.” The visitor’s voice rose almost to a shout.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0022.xml
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19,34,35
General Articles
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Melancholy Monarch
Western Europe waits uneasily for a move from the king who is not a king — but Leopold won’t abdicate and Belgium won’t ask him back
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L. S. B. SHAPIRO
BRUSSELS—In the Swiss town of Pregny there is a large villa nobly set upon spacious grounds overlooking the lake of Geneva. The gates to the estate are locked and guarded. Motorists can see nothing except the eaves of the villa etched against the summer sky.
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20,21,22,40
Fiction
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Air-nest and the Child Harold
Mr. Dart went fishing for a big trout. Instead, he caught a strange creature chewing bubble gum and weighing forty pounds
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W. O. MITCHELL
THE STILLNESS of the clearing was broken now and again by the knock of a woodpecker on the ridge of the cabin. Along the branch of a nearby cottonwood a shrill red squirrel enjoyed a nervous breakdown. Over the meadow beyond the corral a colt ran on stilting legs and a calf went rocking like a metronome loosed of its gearings over the baize of spring grass.
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Guideposts to the Alaska Road
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How Long Will the Trip Take?— From Eastern Canada via Edmonton to Fairbanks and return, at least 24 days; from Vancouver, at least 13 days. Most travelers do 300 miles a day on the Alaska Highway. Better figure on taking 11 or 12 days from Edmonton to Fairbanks and back.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0064.xml
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General Articles
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ANYBODY CAN CATCH A WHALE
Go whaling by canoe? Sounds crazy. But that’s just what they do in Churchill
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C. B. COLBY
IF I hadn’t been so cold, shivering and wet and lame, I would have sworn it was all a dream. What in thunder was I doing standing in the tossing bow of a canoe careening through the cold waters of Churchill Bay, harpoon in hand, looking for a white whale to stick it into? After all, I’m a moderately peaceful guy, but apparently back there somewhere in all of us males is the desire to “stick-something-with-something” handed down by our restless ancestors.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0074.xml
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MAILBAG
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Union with U.S.: The Battle’s On
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Canada and the U. S. Many many thanks to Mr. Arthur Lower for “If We Joined the U. S. A.” (June 15). I believe that if every Canadian citizen could have the opportunity to read your article they would certainly be in favor of uniting the two nations; united in arms in wartime and why not in peace . . .?—George Hamel, Hearst, Ont.
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MAILBAG
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Footnote to “Who Called It That?”
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(Maclean’s, July 1) I would like to call your attention to a statement regarding the origin of the name Flin Flon, a Manitoba mining community. Douglas How says, “(It) is believed to have come from the pages of a book a miner was reading but nobody knows for sure.” . . . The name was taken from the book “The Sunless City” by J. E. Preston Muddock.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0078.xml
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HUMOR
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WIT AND WISDOM
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Real Reason — While in the United States Navy, Author Rex Stout was assigned to the presidential yacht, the Mayflower. A short time after he assumed his duties, he was lifted from the enlisted men’s ranks and appointed warrant officer. Puzzled cronies could not understand this rapid promotion.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0082.xml
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Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0083.xml
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HUMOR
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PARADE
THE GRIN AND BARE IT SECTION
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ON A WARM summer’s day Windsor police rushed off to an address on Ouellette Avenue. They were dispatched by a woman who had been talking on the telephone to a friend when the lady at the other end suddenly lapsed into silence. When officers arrived at the address given, they found the silent lady peacefully asleep beside her phone.
Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0084.xml
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Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0085.xml
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Maclean's_19480801_0061_015_0086.xml