Issue: 19910801

Thursday, August 1, 1991
August
4
True
96
Friday, December 19, 2014

Articles
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FIELD & STREAM
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0001.xml
advertisement
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0_2,0_3,0_4,1
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Philip Morris Inc.: Marlboro MEDIUM
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Philip Morris Inc.
Marlboro MEDIUM
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0002.xml
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2
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Advertisement: 21 BPS
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21 BPS
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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FIELD & STREAM
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0004.xml
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4
4
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Havoline: TEXACO SYSTEM3 AND HAVOLINE FORMULA3
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Havoline
TEXACO SYSTEM3 AND HAVOLINE FORMULA3
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0005.xml
article
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5
UP FRONT
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UP FRONT
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It is a good bet that the steady demand for bear parts in the Orient, especially in Korea, is pressuring grizzly and black bear populations throughout North America. Bear gallbladders, or "galls," are worth up to $4,600 an ounce in Seoul where they are used for medicinal and aphrodisiac purposes.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0006.xml
masthead
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FIELD & STREAM
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0007.xml
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6
6,7
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Goodyear: Goodyear Wrangler radiais
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Goodyear
Goodyear Wrangler radiais
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0008.xml
article
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8,9
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CHEERS & JEERS
The Litterbugs
Animal Rights
How's That Again?
Itch Relief
Bearing Down
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What is it about fishing that makes a fisherman so weak? Before he starts fishing he has the strength to carry a full sixpack, but when he finishes fishing he doesn't have the strength to carry the empties. HARRY J. HARDING Felton, Del.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0009.xml
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9
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BUCK KNIVES, INC.: BUCK KNIVES
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BUCK KNIVES, INC.
BUCK KNIVES
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0010.xml
article
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10
HILL COUNTRY
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MISSING SOUNDS
Being hard of hearing allows us to listen to what we want, when we want, even if we sometimes need to rely on our imagination.
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GENE HILL
I`ve never really feared being hard of hearing because I grew up that way. The trouble is that it gets worse. I've learned to adapt worse. I've learned to adapt and consider the problem more of an annoyance than an affliction. I can't say that the people who spend a lot of time repeating what they've said to me would agree, but there it is.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0011.xml
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11
11
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AMERICAN EAGLE: American Eagle shotshe1ls
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AMERICAN EAGLE
American Eagle shotshe1ls
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0012.xml
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12
12,13
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R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.: new rich Winston
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R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
new rich Winston
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0013.xml
article
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14,16
CONSERVATION
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THE GOOD IT DOES
Can one person make a difference? Absolutely, as people who care about conservation have proven time and again.
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GEORGE REIGER
As I travel around the country, talking to student and sportsmen groups, I urge my audiences to get involved in - conservation even if it means nothing more than making a phone call or writing a letter. Unhappily, an all-too-common response is, "What good will it do?"
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0014.xml
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15
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Coors Brewing Company: Coors Pure Water
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Coors Brewing Company
Coors Pure Water
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0015.xml
article
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16
BOOKS & COMMENTS
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BOOKS & COMMENTS
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STONEFLY AND CADDIS FLY-FISHING, by Leonard M. Wright, Jr. 80 pp. Ifflustrated. Part of the Cortland Library series. Lyons & Burford, Publishers, Dept. FS, 31 West 21 St., New York, N.Y. 10010. $9.95. Caddises and stoneflies are the other, often ignored hatches on our trout streams (distinct from mayflies with upright wings) and are best represented with flies of a downwing profile.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0016.xml
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17
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Advertisement
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0017.xml
article
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18,20
FISHING TECHNIQUES
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SNAGGED!
To all anglers who have ever tossed a lure into trees, weeds, stumps, rocks, and other hard places, this one's for you.
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KEN SCHULTZ
No matter how good a quarterback Joe Montana is, sometimes he throws a football over a receiver's head. There isn't a basketball penalty shot, and even the best baseball pitchers occasionally sail a high one over the batter and clear to the backstop.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0018.xml
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19
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Ford: Ford Trucks
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Ford
Ford Trucks
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0019.xml
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21
21
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Philip Morris Inc.: Bucks
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Philip Morris Inc.
Bucks
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0020.xml
article
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22,23
GUEST SHOT
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HUNTER, HUNTED, HUNTER
When you've lost an important part of yourself, how do you get it back?
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FLEET LENTZ
Within a split second after the blue smoke puffs began blooming in the air around the Phantom fighter jet, I guessed that we had been decoyed. The forward air controller's radio call of "looks like a flak trap. . ." confirmed the guess. Already my pilot had us in a 6-G hard starboard break turn, and we struggled wildly to weave our way out of range of several North Vietnamese antiaircraft batteries.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0021.xml
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23
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Coty: STETSON
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Coty
STETSON
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0022.xml
article
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24,25
HUMOR
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PIER PRESSURE
Sometimes a hopeless situation can net unlikely results.
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PHILLIP MANNING
Of all the regulars at the Sunrise Beach fishing pier, Hopeless was probably the most regular and certainly the most hopeless. If it takes talent to not catch fish, then Hopeless was our Caruso, our Hemingway. The Leonardo of losers. Sometimes it was plain bad luck.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0023.xml
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GLOCK, INC.: Glock Model 22.40 S&W Caliber Semiautomatic Pistol
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GLOCK, INC.
Glock Model 22.40 S&W Caliber Semiautomatic Pistol
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0024.xml
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25
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Leupold & Stevens, Inc.: L.O.V.
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Leupold & Stevens, Inc.
L.O.V.
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0025.xml
article
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FISHING TACTICS
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THE LIGHT TOUCH
To take more trout with the dry fly, keep in mind that presentation and drag-free drift are more important than a "perfect" pattern.
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JIM BASHLINE
Fishing the floating fly is high adventure, and most of us would like to do it better. Improvement begins by understanding a fundamental truth: presentation and drag-free drift are more important than picking the "perfect" pattern. Causing a dry fly to meet the water as softly as a butterfly's kiss is lovely to behold, and doing so will automatically raise your daily score on fussy trout.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0026.xml
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27
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WISCONSIN PHARMACAL CO., INC.: REPEL
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WISCONSIN PHARMACAL CO., INC.
REPEL
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0027.xml
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28,29
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The American Tobacco Co.
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The American Tobacco Co.
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0028.xml
article
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30,31
BOWH U NTI NG
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COMPOUNDING: THE DILEMMA OF THAT FIRST BOW
You don't need a degree in physics to make the right selection, but you do need to read what follows.
nase. THE VARIABLES
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LIONEL ATWILL
Shopping for that first bow, the new archer faces a numbing array of choices. And when he asks for advice, he often hears nothing but high-tech babble that could scare an engineer. To make buying a first compound slightly less intimidating, let's look at the basics, run down the variables, then trim those choices to a workable selection.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0029.xml
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32
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AirForce
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AirForce
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0030.xml
article
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33,80,81
FEATURES
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GRANDPA and the KID
No matter how much fun you're having, when the weather hints that it's time to pack up and head for home, you'd better pay attention!
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DAN SISSON
Ever since Vern Reynolds, one of my fishing buddies, caught an 8-pound rainbow from a float tube, I had been dying to try one out. So when Vern's Dad bought two new float tubes and said we could use the old ones, I saw my chance and accepted for Grandpa and me.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0031.xml
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34,35,75
FEATURES
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HIGH NOON
Contrary to popular belief, bass may bite best under a blazing midday sun.
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MARK HICKS
When the sun burns off the morning mist and cranks up the heat, does your zeal for bass fishing evaporate like the sweat from your brow? If so, you're not alone. Launching ramps are busy just before noon as fishermen hastily load their boats and make tracks for the shade.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0032.xml
article
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36,37,74,75
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The ART and SCIENCE of STALKING PRONGHORNS
Antelope can out-see you and out-rUn you, but if you can out-think them and out-crawl them, you'll fill your tag.
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WALTER L. PROTHERO
I took my first pronghorn at fourteen in Wyoming's Red Desert. The alkali, white-dusty, counter-top flat prairie was as exotic to me as the Amazon, because instead of the timber I was used to, the tallest vegetation was wind-stunted, shin-high sagebrush.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0033.xml
article
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38,39,76
FEATURES
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THE BIG UGLY
They have beady eyes, flattened craniums, and hides the color of garden slugs. Still, there's not a fish swimming in freshwater that's more thrilling to catch than the flathead.
FLATHEAD CONSERVATION
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KEITH SUTTON
Don't judge folk by appearances alone," my mother used to say. Such is my advice to anyone getting acquainted with the flathead catfish. The flathead is a brute of a fish, muscular and streamfish, muscular and streamlined, but ugly by all accepted standards.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0034.xml
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40,41,81,82
FEATURES
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GOING to EXTREMES
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TED LEESON
A short four months ago, the river in front of me flowed full and cold, and if you bushwacked from the road, the sound of the surging current was all the compass you needed. The water was as clear as you'd want, holding just enough color to make the deeper pools dark with possibility.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0035.xml
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42,43,70,71,72
FEATURES
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AN INCH OF SEPTEMBER
Any elk taken with a bow is a trophy, and when it's this early in the season, a bowhunter will do almost anything to get one.
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JOHN BARSNESS
The central Idaho mountains—that vast upwelling of rock stretching from Washington to Montana known as the Idaho Batho1ith—rise so steeply that even lug-soled feet tend to slide off. Some people do hike in—weekend backpackers from Boise and other ur ban sprawls-but they are transients who leave after three days, jobs and low supplies of freeze-dried Stroganoff pulling them back down.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0036.xml
article
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44,45,75,76
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JOE MESSINGER'S FABULOUS FROGS
One of bass fishing's classic patterns-the deer-hair frog-sprang from the innovative mind of this former West Virginia coal miner.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
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JIM DEAN
Joe Messinger must have been concerned about his future when he returned to West Virginia after World War I. Although he'd worked in the coal mines since he was fourteen and had a job waiting for him back home, he still hadn't fully recovered from the shrapnel wounds he'd gotten when a shell burst under his Medical Corps ambulance.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0037.xml
article
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46,47,79
FEATURES
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ANTIHUNTING 101
AS the hunting debate heats up, a class at West Virginia University takes a scholarly look at these often emotional issues.
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LIONEL ATWILL
At the start of the semester, the girl in the front row of the class wore her hair spiked and dyed the color of a purple plastic worm. Today, six weeks into the course, she has changed her coif. The spikes have grown into an electric shag and been bleached a fish-belly white.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0038.xml
article
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48,73,74
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How To HAVE MORE AND BIGGER FISH
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JEROME B. ROBINSON
Fishery management has matured significantly since the days when success only meant stocking enough creel-sized fish to keep fishermen from complaining. Now, instead of sidestepping the causes of fishery declines and simply stocking more fish, effective fish biologists figure out why fisheries have failed and then deal with each cause directly.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0039.xml
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Advertisement
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0040.xml
article
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50
FIELD & STREAM Jr.
. . . FOR YOUNG SPORTSMEN
LURES THAT REALLY CATCH TROUT
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DANNY HICKS
WHEN assembling a vest or tackle box for trout fishing, there are three lures that you should definitely include. Each is a proven trout catcher, effective in lakes or streams, cast or trolled. Spinners are the greatest allround trout lure, and the singlehook 1/8-ounce brown Roostertail with a gold blade could be the world’s best.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0041.xml
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50
FIELD & STREAM Jr.
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WHAT FISH EAT
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WILLIAM G. TAPPLY
SKEETER CRONIN AND I USED to fish in every pond and brook within biking distance of home. We always dug worms for bait from Mr. Cronin’s garden and we caught a lot of fish. But when all sorts of garden pests started eating Mr. Cronin’s vegetables, we decided to try some for bait.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0042.xml
article
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51
FIELD & STREAM Jr.
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ARROWHEADS
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John Barsness
One of the great things about being a hunter or fisherman is the fact that there are so many things you can do while you’re enjoying your favorite sport. One of these “extras” is looking for arrowheads left behind by Indians hundreds or even thousands of years before.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0043.xml
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51
FIELD & STREAM Jr.
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SAFETIES AREN'T SAFE
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ONE OF THE DANGEROUS MYTHS IN shooting is that a gun on “safe” won’t fire. This is like saying that a car with brakes will never get in an accident. It’s true that the safety keeps the trigger from being pulled, but a cartridge is actually set off by the firing pin, which is not controlled by the safety.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0044.xml
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51
FIELD & STREAM Jr.
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BEST FISHING TIMES
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ACCORDING TO THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC, THE BEST TIMES TO GO FISHING ARE: * ONE HOUR BEFORE AND ONE HOUR AFTER HIGH AND LOW TIDES. * RIGHT AFTER SUNUP AND JUST BEFORE AND FOR AN HOUR AFTER SUNDOWN. * WHEN THE WIND IS COMING FROM THE WEST. * WHEN THE BAROMETER IS STEADY OR ON THE RISE.
FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0045.xml
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Advertisements
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True value HARDWARE
STAIN PRODUCTS
True value HARDWARE
DECK TREATMENTS
True value HARDWARE
WOODSMAN STAIN BRUSH
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0046.xml
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53,54,55,56,57
NORTHEAST EDITION
BY THE WAY...
TAKING THE HEAT
When you're trying to catch bass during summer's hothouse conditions, locating largemouths and their comfort zones is key, and a little luck never hurts.
AUGUST HOTSPOT
HOT-WEATHER BUGGING
LARGEMOUTHS AFTER DARK
HOT-WEATHER LURES
STATE INFORMATION SOURCES
TOWARD BIGGER BASS
TROUT FOUND
Delaware Riverkeeper
AWARD WINNERS
SALMON QUOTA
EXCELLENT YEAR FOR
TREMENDOUS TUNA!
Pheasant Production End
NEW JERSEY SALTWATER ANGLERS—EXPOSED!
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JOE REYNOLDS
Heatwaves shimmer silently above the parched landscape. Air temperatures push toward the three-digit range and water temperatures aren't far behind. Even the nights don't bring much relief from the oppressive heat and humidity. It's August, a popular month for vacationing and fishing, but anglers seeking largemouth bass in the Northeast will often be disappointed if they aren't prepared for hot-weather fishing. Humans and largemouth bass react to the heatwave in similar fashion. Both species seem to have less energy, are less inclined to eat, and are driven by an overwhelming desire to seek out comfort zones. Those who wish to catch bass during these late-summer hothouse conditions need to understand how largemouths react to the increase in water temperature, how to locate the comfort zones, how to predict when the fish might be more inclined to feed, what lures may be móst attractive to the fish, and many other aspects of hot-weather bass fishing. Of course, a little luck never hurts, either. My first memories of late-summer bassing go back forty years. My family lived on a tidal creek off the upper Chesapeake Bay and the waters were loaded with largemouths. It was rare to see anyone bass fishing during the heat ofmidday. Four or five of us were swimming at the end of old man Grebner's pier one afternoon in August when an angler in a boat eased up to an adjacent pier and began working a popping bug around the pilings. "Look at that guy," I remarked wisely to my buddies. "Wasting his time trying to catch bass in the middle of a hot day." JOE REYNOLDS, the author, is FeLO & STREAM'S Northeast Regional Editor. The words had barely escaped from my lips when the fisherman's bug disappeared in a splashy strike. The fish was quickly tangled in the thick milfoil that blanketed the creek, but the angler dug into the greenery with a long-handled net and extracted what proved to be a bass that topped 5 pounds—a trophy for those tidal waters. I had learned my first hot-weather bass fishing lesson: There are no absolutes. Bass may be unpredictable, but most experts would agree that there is enough of a pattern to enhance the chances of an angler who understands how bass are most likely to react in hot weather. For example, in that tidal-creek situation the lucky angler's 5-pound bass did strike at the most likely time, but statistically, the periods of dawn and dusk were more promising times. As a practical matter, Northeast bass waters may be divided into two categories: deep impoundments; and relatively shallow ponds, lakes, rivers, and brackish-water tidal areas. Anglers, too, may be divided into two categories: those who have the patience, desire, and intelligence to master fishing deep water, and those who don't. Some anglers have the patience and intelligence, but not the desire. Fishing for largemouth bass in deep water can be frustrating, even for the experts. At certain times of the year—especially spring and fall when fish are in shallow water—similar lures and fishing techniques will bring success to anglers on both water categories. However, summer brings a transformation that causes bass to seek the cooler temperatures found in • The Potomac River may just be the best bet for vacationing or casual fishermen to catch plenty of largemouths in August. Even avid bass anglers will find Potomac fishing fast and interesting. "It's all vegetation-oriented fishing, mainly around thick beds of hydrilla," says guide Ken Penrod. "The lowlight hours of the day are best for surface plugging. As the sun gets high on the water, the bass move deeper into the grass, become less inclined to look for food at the surface, and we switch to plastic worms. Most of the fish are in 5 to 7 feet of water at this time. Hydrilla will only grow in water up to about 8 feet deep. The largest bass are on the deep-water side of the hydrilla, where the grass is not quite as thick as on the shallow side." An average Potomac River largemouth weighs about 2 pounds. Penrod says that over the last six years his clients have averaged about three 8-pound fish per year, but that large numbers of 3to 4-pound fish are taken, especially on surface lures early in the morning. For information, contact Ken Penrod, Outdoor Life Unlimited, Dept. FS, T3028 Ingleside Dr., Beltsville, Md. 20705, telephone (301) 572-5688. Learning to take largemouths from deep water is like taking a course in advanced calculus; not everyone has the persistence or the smarts to make a passing grade. • Some fly fishermen's techniques could lead you to believe that the seasons of spring and fall never end. Some throw bugs all the time—even in August—knowing full well that they have a better chance of being hit by lightning than seeing their popper inhaled by a bass. The exception is the bass bugger who works shoreline cover and weedbeds at dawn and dusk. The bugging rod should be 8V2feet long (give or take a few inches), made of graphite, and rated by the manufacturer for handling a size 8or 9 fly line. Graphite rods tend to handle a wider range of line sizes and are lighter and more powerful than comparable fiberglass models. Popping bugs come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Don't become overly concerned about which color to choose; bass don't seem to have a preference. I like white or yellow bugs because they are easy to see on the water. Most fly-rodders believe that larger bugs, even approaching the size of bugs used in saltwater, will draw more strikes from largemouths. My own experience is that size is not a critical factor, and I'll choose bugs of a moderate size that are easier to cast. the greatest depths of deep-water impoundments. Bass living in bodies of shallow water cannot retreat to cooler depths, but they do seek out shade, underwater springs, or other locations that may provide some relief from the heat. Largemouths in deep-water impoundments have more options available in terms of finding a comfortable location. Thus, they may be more apt to feed at any ; time during the day than bass restricted to shallow, warm water. The problem for the deep-water angler is locating the holding areas where largemouths congrégate in hot weather, a task beyond the ability of all but the most serious anglers. It takes a truly dedicated bass fisherman to master the skills necessary to regularly take largemouths from deep water in late summer. By contrast, the shallow-water angler will continue to have success with the same sort of techniques often used when the fish are in the shallows during spring. Tossing surface plugs along a barren shoreline at high noon might even produce some bass, but working those plugs around docks, pilings, blowdowns, weed beds, and other cover at dawn or dusk will greatly increase the odds for success. Those who seek out largemouths in deep-water lakes and reservoirs need to experiment intensively on specific waters, rather than take a scattergun approach where learning efforts are expended on a number of different waters. Short of having a great deal of luck, initial visits to deep-water lakes are likely to be unproductive. Learning to take largemouth bass consistently from deep water might be compared to taking a course in advanced calculus; not everyone has the persistence or the smarts to make a passing grade. I make no claim to being a deep-water expert, but I have been fortunate enough to fish with professionals like Marylander Don Wilson. Before his untimely death in an automobile accident, Wilson was one of the,few experts at taking bass from Baltimore's water-supply reservoirs. His techniques are applicable to deep-water fishing anywhere in the Northeast. Our first outing together, on Liberty Reservoir, produced more bass for me than all of my prior trips to Liberty combined, including a 7-pound largemouth that is the biggest I've ever caught in Maryland waters. Most of the fish we caught that day were taken on black plastic worms, but Wilson's theory was that choosing the right lure was not as important as fishing a lure in the right place. "The hottest lure around isn't going to catch a single bass if there aren't any bass ! in the spot you're fishing," Wilson told I me. That's a rather simplistic, obvious ! statement, but the fact of the matter is ; that most casts on deep-water reservoirs ; and lakes in late summer may as well be ; made in your neighbor's swimming pool. ; Experience is the one and only key to find: ing bass. Rely on luck, and you're likely to : put together a string of unsuccessful trips. Wilson felt that the key to his success ; was acquiring an intimate knowledge of a ; lake's topography, both from maps and ; from his own notes on bottom configuraj tion and structure based on extensive use i of a depth finder over a period of years, i "I try to visualize the lake as though it ; had no water," he once explained to me. j "The ability to do this is what separates : successful deep-water anglers from the j also-rans. I learn something new every : time I fish a lake, not about the fish, but ; about the bottom. The fish are relatively ; predictable, when compared with the ; problem of locating them." j. Wilson said he had barely begun to unj derstand the structure and contours of : Liberty Reservoir, for example, yet he had ; studied the lake for many years. "Trying ; to solve the puzzle of where bass are lo: cated is like working on a complicated ; mathematical equation," I once heard him I explain during a seminar. "Water temper; ature is an important variable, but clarity : also influences fish movements, as does ; water level fluctuations, availability of j food, and other variables." ; Surface elevations of most manmade lakes ; and some natural lakes tend to fluctuate ; greatly. Water levels may change 30 feet or : more between dry and wet periods. Drought ; years provide excellent opportunities to view ; the lake bottom and locate fish-holding struc; ture that could be productive when water j levels rise again. Smart anglers may spend i more time taking notes than they do fish! ing when a particularly severe drought ex; poses large portions of the bottom, j Although each lake is different, most an; glers surveying an exposed lake bottom are surprised by how vast the areas of flat, featureless bottom compare with the relatively scarce fish-holding structure areas. Topographical maps and depth finders are good tools, but nothing is as enlightening as actually seeing the bottom. ■ Joe Bergin, a fisheries biologist with the Massachusetts Division of Fish and Wildlife, says that many avid New England largemouth bass fishermen resort to night fishing in August. Night fishing is a successful technique that can be used throughout the Northeast, but one that many anglers do not try. Night fishermen are a special breed. Most night anglers tend to use surface plugs, but I've had more luck with plastic worms. I like to fish the worms around areas of gravel or rocky bottoms in 4 to 8 feet of water. It's strictly a matter of personal preference, but I'd also rather fish from the bank than from a boat during nighttime expeditions. I concentrate on shelf areas near points where the bottom drops off sharply. For some reason, the bass seem to prefer a flat bottom for night feeding, or more likely, the flat bottom is what attracts the bait at night as the schools move in to feed on flies and terrestrials that often cloud the skies in the hours just after sunset. While food is readily available just after dark, baitfish may not move into the shallows until after midnight, perhaps waiting for the water to cool slightly from the heat of the day. The best bass fishing is likely to occur between midnight and dawn. • Summer bass expert Don Wilson always preferred plastic worms and jigs for deep-water bass in summer, but today's experts like Ken Penrod and Harry Vanderweide opt for deepdiving crankbaits when bass are feeding in 10 to 20 feet of water. "One reason I like the crankbaits is that I can retrieve these at speeds so the lure crashes through the bass and the baitfish, perhaps making the bass feel threatened," Penrod says. "Drop lures designed to be worked nearly vertically are also good. The finesse technique is to drop a lightly weighted grub into bass that are actively feeding, as opposed to aggrevating non-feeding bass into striking." Bass tend to move deeper as clarity and/or water temperature increases. At some point the fish find temperatures and clarity conditions to their liking, but also insist on a suitable bottom configuration or structure. Wilson said that after years of experimentation he had finally decided to concentrate on likely structure in depths of 15 to 25 feet during periods of hot weather. "I've found bass in deeper and shallower water, but generally around the 20-foot level has always been where I've found the most largemouths," he said. Wilson also liked to compare deep-water bass fishing to quail hunting. "A quail hunter who works a particular piece of land over several seasons begins to know where the coveys are likely to be holding," he said. "As the hunter's experience increases, he will begin skipping all but the productive areas. Same thing happens with an experienced bass fisherman. On my home water I now concentrate on deep-water spots that have produced in the past. My advantage over the occasional angler is that on any given cast, my lure is probably ten times more likely to move in front of a bass. Catching largemouths in hot weather is easy; locating largemouths to catch is the difficult part. "When I travel to new water, it's like starting all over again. Sure, there is some basic knowledge that I've gained in terms of locating fish-holding areas, but every lake presents new and interesting challenges. I'd say that on any decent-sized lake it will take three or four seasons of hard fishing for even a dedicated angler to locate any number of deep-water spots where bass congregate. That's why a knowledgeable guide is invaluable for an angler fishing new water, especially in midsummer." Ken Penrod operates a guide fishing service that services bass fishing in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Faced with the task of finding August largemouths for his customers, Penrod echoes much of what Wilson said about deep-water bass fishing. Penrod, however, extends Wilson's theories to include more of a consideration of baitfish in the pattern. "I concentrate on points, using a good depth finder," Penrod says, "but I'm looking for baitfish as much as bass and bottom structure. Once I find baitfish I don't really care if I find bass immediately. The bass will be near their lunch bucket. The best points are those that drop fairly abruptly to where the old channel is located. "Imagine a point that extends out into water with a depth of 30 feet or more. If the comfort zone for bass is at the 20-foot level, the fish will not necessarily be at the bottom in 20 feet of water. They could be farther out off the point where water is very deep, but suspended at the 20-foot comfort level. Suspended fish are more or less in a resting mode; at feeding time they move in toward the shallower water where there is bait near structure at the level of the comfort zone." According to Penrod many bass fishermen make a serious mistake in not considering the fact that bass tend to sus■ pend over deep water. Fie notes that suspended bass are not typically in an eating mode, although a deep-diving crankbait worked quickly through a school may sometimes provoke a strike. When Penrod locates suspended bass he knows that at some point they'll be moving in toward shallower water to feed. "During hot months like August they may move in to feed three or four times during the day," he says. "The key is to be there when the feeding begins. Timing is important because the feeding activity may last only 10 or 15 minutes." Penrod believes the reason most anglers have problems catching summer bass is that they are too oriented toward fishing shoreline cover. "If they are fishing from a boat they'll be a cast length off shore; if they are fishing from shore they are limited to a cast length from shore," he explains. "I've seen many anglers throwing from their boats toward shore when they should have been casting toward open water behind them, because that's where the bass were located." Harry Vanderweide, author of Maine Bassin', a comprehensive book about both largemouth and smallmouth bass fishing in Maine, operates at the opposite end of the Northeast from Penrod, but confirms that summer largemouth fishing in New England is very much like that in the region's southern range. THE FINAL ANALYSIS ■ It's obvious that casual fishermen are not likely to experience much success with deep-water largemouths without the assistance of a guide or another knowledgeable angler. If you are fishing alone, your best bet is to fish shallow lakes and ponds around first light, and again at dusk. Those who want to master deep-water largemouth fishing should concentrate on a single large reservoir or lake. Study topographical maps, purchase a good depth finder (preferably a recording type), and be prepared for plenty of slow fishing days until the pattern of the particular lake begins to come into focus. "August largemouth fishing is not easy for the casual fisherman," Vanderweide says. "While largemouths will move into relatively shallow water—even in the middle of the day—consistent success usually requires a knowledge of deep-water fishing. It seems the best areas are around rocky outcroppings in about 20 feet of water." Whichever Northeast state you choose to fish, don't overlook largemouths this August. Sure, fishing during the dog days can be discouraging, but the bass are there; you just have to know how to find them. □ • Contact the following agencies about late-summer largemouth bass fishing opportunities and regulations in your area of the Northeast: © Connecticut Bureau of Fisheries, Dept. FS, 165 Capitol Ave., Hartford, Conn. 06106, telephone (203) 566-4477. © Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife, Dept. FS, P.O. Box 1401, Dover, Del. 19903, telephone (302) 736-3441. © Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Dept. FS, 284 State St., Station 41, Augusta, Maine 04333, telephone (207) 289-2871. © Maryland Tidewater Administration, Dept. FS, Tawes State Office Building, 580 Taylor Avenue, Annapolis, Md. 21401, telephone (301) 974-3061. © Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Field Headquarters, Dept. FS, North Street, Westboro, Mass. 01581, telephone (508) 366-4470. , ' • . © New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, Dept. FS, 2 Hazen Dr., Concord, N.H. 03301, telephone (603)271-2501. © New Jersey Division of Fish, Game and Wildlife, Box 394, Dept. FS, Lebanon, N.J. 08833, telephone (201) 236-2118. © New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Bureau of Fisheries, Dept. FS, 50 Wolf Rd., Albany, N.Y. 12233, telephone (518) 457-5420. © Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Dept. FS, P.O. Box 1673, Harrisburg, Pa. 17105-1673, telephone (717) 657-4518. ® Rhode Island Division of Fish and Wildlife, Dept. FS, Field Headquarters, West Kingston, R.l. 02892, telephone (401) 789-0281. © Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department, Information and Education Division, Dept. FS, Waterbury, Vt. 05676. telephone (802) 244-7331. New bass fishing regulations for Pennsylvania streams and rivers could result in some outstanding smallmouth fishing in a few years. The regulations involve important changes to both seasons and bag limits. Bass season is currently closed on all rivers and streams from April 12 through June 14. The new creel limit is six bass per day, each of which must measure IS inches or more in length. The previous size limit was 10 inches. These changes alone should result in bigger bass, but additional special regulations on the Susquehanna River from the Dock Street Dam at Harrisburg to Holtwood should make this area one of the prime rivers in the Northeast for big river smallmouths. The special regulations call for a creel limit of four bass per day, and a minimum size limit of 15 inches. ■ Rick Hoopes, warm water unit leader for the Pennsylvania Pish Commission, says he expects the catch rate of fish over 12 inches to double in two years throughout the state, and to quadruple in the specially regulated area below Dock Street Dam. “In three years anglers can expect to catch a fair number of smallmouths between 2 and 3 pounds in the specially regulated area,” Hoopes says. “Right now there are relatively few bass that size. It takes five to six years for a bass to grow to 15 inches in the Susquehanna, and the new regulations will protect them until they reach that age.” IN PATAPSCO ✓ Maryland Trout Unlimited . members are excited about their discovery of a trout population in the East Branch of the Patapsco River in Carroll County. The Patapsco can only be described as “ugly’rthroughout most of its stretch near the Baltimore Harbor, but water quality has improved dramatically over the last twenty years. Last year, a landowner on the East Branch contacted TU about investigating a mile-long stretch of the river that fronted his property with the hope of finding evidence of native trout. The investigative group was discouraged to discover a lack of protective vegetation in the riparian zone of the headwaters and tributaries, as well as serious bank deterioration. TU members then electroshocked an area of the stream owned by the landowner. They were excited with the first shockings, which produced numerous baitfish, indicative that the water is also suitable for trout. This observation was promptly confirmed when the shocking device turned up two brook trout, including a 13-inch female in spawning colors. ❖ Cynthia Poten, Delaware Riverkeeper; hasn't received the public exposure of her counterpart on the Hudson River, but she has visited a number of sites to investigate reported spills and other threats to the river. In association with the Watershed Association of the Delaware River; Poten works to protect the watershed from the Catskills to Delaware Bay. Under a new program funded by the William Penn Foundation, Poten is organizing and administering a citizens monitoring program for the estuary portion of the river between Trenton and Delaware Bay. Volunteers will have a choice of jobs involving the monitoring of water quality, habitat health, or pollution. 'We are looking for people who want to look out for the health of the estuary," Poten said. Contact Cynthia Poten, Watershed Association of the Delaware River Dept. FS, PO. Box 753, Lambertville, NJ. 08530, telephone (609) 3974410. * State fishing awards programs are often good sources of information about waters likely to hold big fish. Here is the breakdown on big fish caught in Massachusetts in 1990: More than twenty years of effort by the Atlantic Salmon Federation to obtain commercial harvest quotas on Newfoundland salmon finally paid off in 1990. The new quotas are expected to cut the commercial harvest by up to 30 percent, and unlike the allowance system introduced in 1989, the latest stringent conservation measures are said to be enforceable. In addition to the new quotas, other important aspects of the plan directed at troubled Newfoundland and Labrador salmon runs include a commitment to increase spawning levels, a recognition of the potential of the recreational fishery, and the introduction of management within zones. While conservationists wait to see if the quotas are enforced, they are encouraged by comments made by Bernard Valcourt, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, who is quoted as saying, "I am committed to rebuilding Atlantic salmon stocks." * Salmonid Council (an American Salmon Federation affiliate) President Tom Humphrey is credited with gaining local support for the quotas by helping Newfoundlanders to see the need for quotas and for showing them the potential for a vibrant, profitable, recreational fishery. EP Neui Hampshire fisheries biologist Steve Perry reports that 1990 was the best in six years for the collection of landlocked salmon eggs. This should translate into more landlocked salmon stockings in state waters. ñdult solmon were netted from UDinnipesoukee, Big Squam, ond Sunapee Lakes ond produced 623,100 eggs. Measurement and ageing of these salmon compared with salmon taken from other lakes showed that Big Squam salmon, with one exception, were older and bigger than salmon netted elsewhere. Four-year-old salmon were the exception, averaging 203/5 inches on Big Squam, compared with 23i/io inches on Conway Lake. In lake trout netting operations, biologists found plenty of big lakers in Nubanusit Lake, including one that weighed close to 21 pounds. Sunapee lakers were also impressive, according to biologists. During one 2i/2-hour netting operation, biologists took lakers that ranged from 8 pounds to nearly 17 pounds. Several of the fish weighed over 11 pounds and there were a number of fish in the 9-pound class. □ If one of your angling dreams has been to tangle with a giant bluefin tuna in the 1,000pound range, now is the time to plan a trip to Prince Edward Island. Tackle-busting tuna migrate into the waters off Prince Edward Island in the late summer and fall months, usually remaining until late October. The island's biggest bluefin, caught by Richard Palmer off Morell Harbor about ten years ago, tipped the scales at 1,400 pounds. Tuna are pursued here for both sport and commercial profit; the angler enjoys his sport but the captain claims the tuna for eventual sale in Japan. This helps hold down charter costs, which average about $300 (Canadian currency) for a party of up to six fishermen. For assistance in planning a trip for bluefin tuna, write to Prince Edward Island Department of Tourism and Parks, Dept. FS, P.O. Box 2000, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada CIA 7N8, telephone (800) 565-7421 in the Maritime Provinces, and (800) 565-0267 throughout the rest of North America. One local tuna charter operation is Blue Fin Tuna Charters, North Lake Harbor, Dept. FS, Prince Edward Island, Canada COA 1K0, telephone (902) 357-2785. • This fall will mark the last year that New York pheasant hunters will see birds stocked by the Department of Environmental Conservation. Commissioner Thomas Jorling has announced plans to phase out the production of pheasants; 1991 will mark the last year for pheasant rearing at the Richard E. Reynolds Game . Farm near Ithaca and the John White Game Farm near Bascom. With the department in a budget crisis and pheasant production costing approximately $500,000 per year, Jorling's action accelerates a recommendation of the fish and wildlife program to close these pheasant production facilities. Funds for pheasant rearing had come from the Conservation Fund, which derives its income primarily from hunting and fishing license sales. The DEC plans to stock adult pheasants this fall to complete the 1991 production season. The DEC will be out of the pheasant production business by 1992, but private pheasant hunting opportunities are still encouraged. A publication, "Landowner's Manual for Ringnecked Pheasant Habitat Improvement," as well as a list of commercial gamebird breeders and shooting preserves, is available free from DEC wildlife offices, or write to Special License Unit, Department of Environmental Conservation, Dept. FS, 50 Wolf Rd., Albany, N.Y. 12233. New Jersey has completed a study of the state's saltwater anglers regarding their fishing activities in 1988. Results of interviews conducted with 391 marine anglers show that the typical New Jersey angler is male, attended college, and both his age and income are in the forties.
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NORTHEAST EDITION
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LAKE ONTARIO SALMON
HOTTEST LURES
_ WHAT TO BRING
MARINE RADIO
FISH VARIETY
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With the demise of Lake Michigan as a prime salmon arena, savvy sport fishermen as well as charter captains have turned their attention to Lake Ontario, which continues to produce wallhanging trophy chinook salmon. Lake Ontario was the last of the major Great Lakes to receive stockings of salmon and trout.
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NORTHEAST EDITION
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BORDERLINE FISHING
BORDERLINE WATERS
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When our pioneer ancestors were drawing up the boundary between the U.S. and Canada, they often found it useful to have clear, geographical features mark the division between the two nations. Sometimes the border follows ridgelines, with the occasional hill or mountain standing like a sentinal tower.
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60a
60a,60b,60c,60d
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3-D bows
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FIELD & STREAM
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FieldAndStream_19910801_0096_004_0050.xml
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60d
60d
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Daisy Manufacturing Company, Inc.: Semiautomatic Pistol
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Daisy Manufacturing Company, Inc.
Semiautomatic Pistol
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SHOOTING
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THE MILD BUNCH
Here are four often-ignored all-around cartridges that make it easy to hit what you aim at.
SHORT SHOTS
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DAVID E. PETZAL
To grasp the full poignancy of this story, you should know that in the 1950s when other kids had heroes whose names were Mantle and Williams and Layne and Unitas, mine was named Page, and that he was Shooting Editor of this magazine. So when, in my thirties, I finally got to meet him and he invited me to pop a cap or two, I was thrilled.
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U.S. Tobacco Co.: Skoal
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U.S. Tobacco Co.
Skoal
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FISHING
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BAIT-CASTING
This made-in-America way to fish is nearly two centuries old. Here's how to put together an outfit that will get you right into the action.
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PETER BARRETT
Bait-casting is the original, madein-America way to fish for black bass and is now 181 years old. A Kentucky watchmaker, George Snyder, started it when he invented the multiplying reel in 1810. Early fishing was with live bait; almost a century would pass before James Heddon began making the first wooden plugs.
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Pennzoil Products Company
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Pennzoil Products Company
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SALTWATER FISHING
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GOING DEEP TO BEAT THE HEAT
Fishing with downriggers may be the coolest way to tackle summer's heatwaves.
SOLVING A TRAILERING PROBLEM WITH A QUICKCHANGE HITCH BALL
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BOB STEARNS
By the time you read this it will be midsummer, and hot as blazes just about everywhere south of the Arctic Circle. No self-respecting gamefish is going to hang around on the surface very long after sunrise and risk being parboiled. This is definitely the time of year when upper-level fishing is mostly a night and early dawn activity; during the day you'd better be doing your thing as deep as possible.
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Cabela's
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VEHICLES
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HANDS OFF?
Though the modern truck engine no longer needs a "tuneup," that doesn't mean you no longer can service your 4x4.
THE LAP OF LUXURY
TROUBLE SIGNS
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SLATON L. WHITE
Once upon a time, the hunter or fisherman who owned a fourwheel-drive pickup or sport utility was obligated to undergo a yearly ritual known as the tuneup. Designed to make the vehicle perform to factory standards, the tuneup commonly involved replacing certain parts and adjusting others, and focused primarily on four key areas: the ignition system, the fuel system, the emissions system, and the engine itself.
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Go-Jo Industries, Inc.: LEMON GO-JO
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Go-Jo Industries, Inc.
LEMON GO-JO
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MAVERICK ARMS,INC.: shotgun
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MAVERICK ARMS,INC.
shotgun
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HOW IT'S DONE
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BUILD A REEL SERVICE VISE
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There's probably nothing worse than arriving at a long-anticipated fishing destination only to find your reel jammed from accumulated grit, dust, and dirt. If you're smart, you'll have brought along a backup reel. If not, you may be able to buy or borrow one and salvage the trip.
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TAP'S TIPS
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TAP'S TIPS
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H. G. TAPPLY
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Advertisements
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Pioneer Research, Inc.
Steiner BigHorn 9x40 binocular
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77
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Advertisement
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GUN DOGS
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MARKING OFF THE GUN
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BILL TARRANT
Omar Driskill is one of those good ol' Southern boys who literally lives on top of his world. There are two reasons for this. Omar resides on the shoulder of Mount Driskill (at 535 feet the highest point in Louisiana) and he's America's foremost professional retriever trainer for the new hunting retriever test circuit.
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81
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Browning: 81 BLR Long Action Rifles
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Browning
81 BLR Long Action Rifles
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WHERE TO GO
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KENNEL & ACCESSORIES
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GAME BREEDERS
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THE CLASSIFIED GUIDE
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EXIT LAUGHING
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EXIT LAUGHING
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ED ZERN
It's more than twenty years since this department disclosed some astonishing facts about crows, as revealed by researchers at the wildlife department of the University of Appalachia. Mainly, these revelations had to do with a crow's ability to count, but only in multiples of three, six, and nine.
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B&W T Co.: RALEIGH EXTRA
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B&W T Co.
RALEIGH EXTRA
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WOLVERINE WORLDWIDE, INC.: WOLVERINE BOOTS & SHOES
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WOLVERINE WORLDWIDE, INC.
WOLVERINE BOOTS & SHOES
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