Issue: 19760102

Friday, January 2, 1976
January
13
True
15
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
2/20/2015 2:03:20 PM

Articles
cover
1
1
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CYCLE WORLD
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CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0001.xml
advertisement
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2
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Advertisement: CYCLE WORLD
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CYCLE WORLD
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CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0002.xml
tableOfContents
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3
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CYCLE WORLD
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CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0003.xml
masthead
3
3
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Masthead
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CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0004.xml
review
4
4,5,6,7,8,9
JUST PASSIN'THROUGH...
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Chasin’The Leaves On An R75/6 BMW
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BMW
[no value]
BMW
R75/6
$3475
D. Randy Riggs
THE IDEA HAD flashed through my mind late last year as I drove to the funeral of a very special lady in the East. “Brownie” was her name, and the day was one of my saddest. But I knew she’d rather have me thinking happy thoughts than miserable ones, and that’s when it hit me.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0005.xml
review
10
10,11,12,13,14,15
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
BULTACO 360 FRONTERA
The Pursang Gets Lights And A Lust For Medals Made Of Gold.
BULTACO
[no value]
BULTACO
360 FRONTERA
$1595
[no value]
BULTACO HAS, like most manufacturers, made two different motorcycles for motocross and enduros. Pursangs for MX and Matadors for enduros. It seemed the logical thing to do. In those days, everyone was clamoring for high-horsepower racers that did not lend themselves at all to plugging along through a thicket of trees or muddy streams.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0006.xml
review
16
16,17,18,19,20,21
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
CAN-AM 125 MX2
Once You Get It Into Third Gear, It’ll Eat Anything Short Of A Full-Blown 250.
CAN-AM
[no value]
CAN-AM
125 MX2
$1295
[no value]
THE HORSEPOWER BATTLE is an intricate game of one-upman-ship that was once played strictly from the advertising table. One manufacturer after another tried to have the most powerful motocrosser—with the widest power-band—all without so much as a porting change over the previous model.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0007.xml
review
22
22,23,24,25,26,27
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
DUCATI 860 V-TWIN
Rare, but worth the trouble of obtaining one.
DUCATI
[no value]
DUCATI
860 V-TWIN
$2549
[no value]
AUTOMOTIVE ENTHUSIASTS won’t have any trouble remembering what was done to some of their favorite marques under the guise of plushness, comfort and luxury. . . not to mention federal emission laws. We watched classics like the two-seater T-Bird turn into lumbering rhinos carting their heart-attack-prone, paunchy owners back and forth to their high-level office buildings.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0008.xml
review
28
28,29,30,31,32,33
JUST PASSIN'THROUGH...
[no value]
California's Mother Lode Country
Gold Nugget Lookin' On Honda's CB750F Super Sport
Honda
[no value]
Honda
CB750F
$2152
D. Randy Riggs
I GUESS I'M like a kid the night before Christmas whenever we're expecting a new road test machine at the CYCLE WORLD offices. There's always lots of expectation and excitement on my part, simply because I love motorcycles just about more than anything, and a glance in my garage would tell anyone that in a blink.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0009.xml
review
34
34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
HONDA GL1000
Is It Competition For The Harley, Or Is It In A Class All By Itself?
HONDA
[no value]
HONDA
GL1000
[no value]
SIGNIFICANT, MAJOR new entries into the motorcycle market don’t come along that often, but when they do, they create more than their share of excitement. And this is even more true when the new machine is unleashed from the inner sanctums of the world’s largest producer of motorcycles.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0010.xml
review
44
44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52
CYCLE WORLD COMPARISON TEST
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HONDA'S 500T Vs. YAMAHA’S XS500
In Answer To The Question: Is One Better Or Is One Worse?
HONDA 500T
YAMAHA SX500B
CATEGORY ONE SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE
CATEGORY TWO FACTORY WARRANTY
TOURING CAPABILITY AND HANDLING ON THE OPEN ROAD
CATEGORY THREE QUALITY OF TOOLKIT
CATEGORY FOUR CARRYING CAPACITY (GROSS VEHICLE WEIGHT, MINUS MACHINE WEIGHT W/FULL-TANK FUEL)
CATEGORY FIVE VIBRATION
TECHNICAL EVALUATION
CATEGORY SIX GAS MILEAGE
CATEGORY SEVEN CRUISING RANGE
CATEGORY EIGHT LIGHTS
CATEGORY NINE STREET PERFORMANCE
CATEGORY TEN BONUS POINTS
CATEGORY ELEVEN PENALTY POINTS
SUMMARY
OVERALL SCORE
HONDA
[no value]
HONDA
500T
$1545
HONDA
XS500
$1749
[no value]
THIS IS THE world of multi-cylinder domination, right? Most of us in the magazine business would like to think so because we really enjoy the big Threes and Fours that offer all the smoothness and performance anyone could ask for. But in reality, Multis are not the best sellers.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0011.xml
review
53
53,54,55,56,57,58
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
HONDA CB550 SUPER SPORT
A Very Good Adaptation of Detroit Thinking
HONDA
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HONDA
CB550 SUPER SPORT
$1830
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IT SEEMS THAT there is a similarity between Detroit thinking and Japanese thinking. Look at it this way. In the late ’60s, Detroit did some marketing research on male consumers in their middle twenties and came to the conclusion that the single most salable item was performance.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0012.xml
advertisement
59
59,60,61
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HONDA: GL-1000
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HONDA
GL-1000
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CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0013.xml
review
62
62,63,64,65,66
Cycle World Road Test
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HUSQVARNA 360CR
Is anybody out there ready for an honest 39 horsepower?
HUSQVARNA
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HUSQVARNA
360CR
$1895
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IT SEEMS SOMEWHAT puzzling that a motorcycle manufacturer—any of whom could use a big-selling model in this time of diminishing sales and rising prices—would produce a machine that they know in advance is designed for a smaller segment of the market than its predecessor.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0014.xml
advertisement
67
67
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Advertisement: CYCLE WORLD
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CYCLE WORLD
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CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0015.xml
review
68
68,69,70,71
Cycle World Road Test
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KAWASAKI MACH IV H2 750
Evil, Wicked, Mean And Nasty
KAWASAKI
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KAWASAKI
MACH IV H2 750
[no value]
WITHOUT A DOUBT, Kawasaki’s awesome 750 Triple is a bike that has outlived its usefulness. It was conceived at a time when the buying public was preoccupied with acceleration. Gut-grabbing acceleration. And little else. And the bike delivered to the tune of mid-12-second quarter-miles and wheelies that would stop your heart.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0016.xml
review
72
72,73,74,75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96,97,98,99,100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124
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BUYERS GUIDE TO THE 1976 MODELS
BULTACO NOTE
SUZUKI NOTE
BENELLI
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BENELLI
250 PHANTOM
$1349
A snappy performer, the Phantom comes complete with electronic ignition, Borrani rims, Marzocchi suspension and flashy Italian styling. Drum brakes are found both fore and aft. A Phantom took the team trophy in the Production class at the Isle of Man. Still, the 250 Twin lacks oil-injection, a feature that is almost a must on any street two-stroke.
BENELLI
500 QUATTRO
$2875
Developed during the same period as the dazzling 750 Sei, the Quattro is a half-liter smoothie. Four-cylinder motorcycles have now become commonplace, but the Quattro is anything but that. Its excellent handling and distinctive Italian styling make it a real eye-catcher.
BENELLI
650 TORNADO
$2199
Good handling from a rigid frame and sporty performance from the five-speed engine make the Tornado a very desirable 650. Ceriani shock absorbers and Marzocchi front forks deliver a precise ride. There's even electric starting. Twin drum brakes up front and a conventional drum in the rear bring things to a halt quickly.
BENELLI
750 SEI
$3995
Often called the Ferrari of motorcycles because of its multi-cylinder engine, the Sei is the smoothest air-cooled motorcycle around. Three Dell'Orto carburetors feed the six cylinders through Y-manifolds. Handling is good, and would be better but for the width required by the six-cylinder powerplant. Double discs and that catchy Italian touch make it a real pleasure to see and ride.
BENELLI
R60/6
$2725
Although the smallest of the BMW Twins, the 600 is still a strong performer. Smooth acceleration and an updated engine get this smoothy flying up to and over the 100-mph mark. Still, it delivers outstanding gas mileage and troublefree operation. The R/60 is the only Bee-Em left without at least one front disc brake.
BENELLI
R75/6
$3125
Though not as peppy as the mighty 900s, the firing impulses on the R/75 are much smoother, lending to a vibrationless overall ride. Couple this to the plushest ride this side of four wheels and you can see why the "mid-size" 750 BMW is our touring favorite. For the R/75, as well as the rest of the line, BMW offers a complete optional touring package with fairing and some superb saddlebags.
BENELLI
R90/6
$3395
The BMW R90/6 is the absolute king of the 60-mph roll-on. No machine can match its passing times from 60-80, when most highway passing is done. Yet it delivers the same excellent economy and ease of maintenance that have become synonymous with the BMW name. For stopping, a perforated front disc and the conventional rear drum do just fine.
BENELLI
R90/S
$3965
And now, the Grand Tourer. A 125-mph motorcycle that delivers fuel economy some 500s would like to claim. In bright orange, the R90/S does everything well and looks great doing everything. Not quite as torquey as its /6 brother, it does have more horsepower on top end. The /S is a machine that any purist would be proud to call his own.
BENELLI
ASTRO 360
Specifically suited to American Class C racing, the Astro from Bultaco has a list of wins across this country that is startling. The machine is totally adjustable, from shock position to steering rake (by sliding the legs up through the triple clamps), to wheelbase. A new Bing carburetor delivers more power to an already potent engine. A disc brake is fitted to the rear to help set the machine up for corners. This one knows only one speed: wide open.
BENELLI
MATADOR 350 MK9
This is a totally new motorcycle for Bultaco. Many features from the older Matador line have been retained, such as strong low-end torque and enclosed rear chain for longer wear and less maintenance. Although the shocks are not forward-mounted, they are gas-pressurized for longer life. A super quiet exhaust system keeps everybody happy. And this machine is fully street-legal!
BENELLI
SHERPA T 125
In a move to capitalize on the ascending novice trials rider, Bultaco has introduced a new "Baby T" trials bike. The new 125 has a 17-in. rear wheel and a 20-in. front wheel to keep its overall seat height 2 in. lower than the Sherpa T 250's. Rear shocks are the same as those on the bigger bike. Ridgeless alloy rims are standard. Popular Pirelli Trials tires keep it in contact with the ground.
BENELLI
SHERPA T 350
In October of 1975, a Sherpa T 350 with Martin Lampkin aboard captured a third consecutive World Trials Championship. The production 350s are very close to the works bike of Lampkin. The differences lie in just a few pounds. Actually, at 197 lb., there is not much pruning to be done to this trialer. The 1976 model has just been received by CYCLE WORLD for testing and it appears to be a super piece of machinery. The engine's smoothness is unparalleled.
BENELLI
125 MX2
$1295
We really waited impatiently for this one. We had already ridden many Can-Ams, and what we'd heard about the 125 made us just that much more anxious. So when we received our test bike at CW, we had to go out and see if it was all true. It was. The MX2 is a good-handling rocketship. No other 125 makes as much horse-power stock as the Can-Am.
BENELLI
125 T'NT
$1195
Can-Am is part of the Bombardier group, famous for the manufacture of Ski-Doo snowmobiles. You might not expect such a manufacturer to be successful in the motorcycle market, but they moved right in with their slick-shifting ultra-powerful motorcycles, such as this 125 T'NT enduro. Features like oil-injection, plastic fenders and great overall performance have ensured them a place in the market.
BENELLI
175 MX2
$1445
If there's any problem whatsoever with the Can-Am 175 MX2, it's that once one shows up at the starting line, everyone else knows that the best they can do is 2nd place. Not only does this machine trounce the 175s, but it can run with the majority of 250 MXers, as well. The powerful rotary-valve engine and excellent suspension are the main reasons.
BENELLI
175 T'NT
$1345
Although possessing more subdued tuning than the exotic MX2, the T'NT model is still a firebreather. . .but with a powerband as mild as a pussycat. You can plonk along through tight trails all day without any problems, then open it up all the way and watch the speedometer clip the 80-mph mark. Can-Am 175 owners have been known to go "250 hunting."
BENELLI
250 MX2
$1595
This is the most powerful 250cc motocrosser on the market. And not just by one or two horsepower either. A single ride on the 250 MX2 and you'll be hooked. Magnesium hubs and lightweight components throughout help keep the weight down to a competitive 212 !b. It is easy to see why Gary Jones won the 1974 250cc National Championship on a Can-Am, not to mention the fact that these rockets also took 2nd and 3rd.
BENELLI
250 T'NT
$1595
Perhaps it's redundant to say it, but again, this is the most powerful machine in its class. If you haven't discovered it by now, Can-Ams are the most powerful machines in every class (125, 175 and 250). The main backbone of the sturdy frame is a spacious oil reservoir for the injection system. Currently, a 250 T'NT with street tires is eating up the 250 Production class in road racing with a CW staffer aboard.
BENELLI
125 STREET
$595
As a basic transportation machine, the CZ is one of the least expensive. Fully street-legal, its mileage should be very good. And there's oil-injection to boot. The 3-gal. tank will allow the machine outstanding range for a 125. And if you should stall it at a stoplight, there's primary kickstarting for your convenience.
BENELLI
250 ENDURO
$1060
Like most good enduro machines, the CZ is based on the marque's successful motocrossers. While it doesn't possess long-travel rear suspension, there are many other features that make it appealing. The engine is very strong, and there's that famous CZ gearbox. Barum tires are standard. Paint scheme is an attractive orange and yellow.
BENELLI
250 MX
$1565
Although he finished 2nd in a mischief-filled and wildly disputed G.P. season, there are those folks who consider Jaroslav Falta to be the 1974 250 World Champion. This machine is the Falta Replica. It features long-travel forks, springless gas shocks, alloy rims and a weight reduction of better than 20 lb. over the more conventional model it replaced.
BENELLI
350 STREET
$995
Here's an oil-injected two-stroke 350 Twin from Czechoslovakia. Performance is tame, as indicated by the single carburetor and the four-speed gearbox, but mile-age should be far better than that of other 350 street ring-dings. For the commuter who wants something that's just a little different.
BENELLI
[no value]
$1670
There was a time when CZ development was so far ahead of everyone else's that it virtually ruled the 500cc G.P. class in motocross. Of course, the other factories have done a lot of catching up, but CZ hasn't let up either. The 400 is a torquey powerhouse with springless gas shocks and magnesium hubs. Shoulderless alloy rims come with the machine and are a great asset on muddy tracks.
BENELLI
SS125
$799
With downswept exhaust pipe, low front fender and street tires, the SS125 is ready for short-haul commuting about town. The oil-injected piston-port engine delivers power through a five-speed transmission. Styling is attractive and the performance is good. Gas mileage is one factor that will help sell this one.
BENELLI
SXT125
$799
In a move to capitalize on the small-bore dual-purpose market, Harley-Davidson has produced, through its Italian Aermacchi factory, a new line of two-cycle motorcycles for the American consumer. The smallest full-sized machine is the 125, shown here in enduro form. Much of the 125's design is carried over from the winning 100cc Harley "Baja" machines of a few years ago.
BENELLI
SS175
$999
A little gearing change, a couple of new tires, some different styling and a new exhaust pipe. Presto! You have just transformed Harley's 175 trail machine into its SS175 street bike. The engine performance is identical, which is a bonus. This one's even freeway-legal in most states. Nice to have when you want to go farther than the corner store for a bottle of pop.
BENELLI
SX175
$971
When this machine was first introduced, it surprised a lot of people. Not because it was Harley's first full-sized two-stroke, but because of its performance. Quite spirited indeed. Suspension is by Ceriani. The main frame backbone serves as a reservoir for the injection oil. All in all, it is a very modern design.
BENELLI
SS250
$1215
Now that the SX has reached a point where it is ready for the rough and tumble off-road world, Harley introduces a new SS250 street bike. Sportster-like slim-line front forks have built-in safety reflectors. There are passenger footpegs provided for two-up riding, and the engine's lubricating oil is carried in the frame's main backbone.
BENELLI
SX250
$1168
While last year's machine was anything but ready for competition in today's marketplace, the SX250 has undergone some changes for 1976. A stronger transmission and better suspension are part of the new package. The steel fenders remain, but that's much easier to remedy than the other stuff. It may not yet be the best 250 dual-purpose machine, but you can bet that Harley is working on it.
BENELLI
XL/XLCH1000
$2849
These two machines are basically similar, with the exception of the electric starter on the XL. That's why it weighs a good 40 pounds more than the XLCH. The kickstart Sportster is still very popular for just that reason. . .you have to kick-start it. The macho group really digs this one.
BENELLI
FX/FXE1200
$3279
For the man who feels that the 1000cc Sportster isn't enough machine for him, and wants to wrestle with kickstarting 1200cc of throbbing V-Twin, the FX is as big as they come. Disc brakes on both wheels are standard on the FX, as well as on the electric-starting FXE. Either machine is guaranteed to get more than its share of curious and envious stares.
BENELLI
FX/FXE1200
$3319
This being the U.S. Bicentennial year, and Harley-Davidson being the U.S.'s largest motorcycle manufacturer, it seemed fitting to design some truly unique tank graphics for the FX/FXE 1200s. The machines are done in basic black with the graphics emblazoned on the fuel tanks. Real eye-catchers.
BENELLI
FLH1200
$3809
This is the "Hog," the big one. Harley-Davidson's answer to Detroit's cushy, rolling cruisemobiles. The FLH gets good gas mileage, but vibrates and is no fun on the mountain roads for the rider who likes to play Agostini. Yet thousands of people love them and buy one every year, simply because they're Harleys. For them, that's enough.
BENELLI
FLH1200
$3975
Just like the other "Liberty Edition" model, the FLH comes in black, but with the Bicentennial graphics glimmering off the wind-screen rather than the tank. Oh, there's a touch of artistry on the tank as well, but the big show is up front.
BENELLI
DIRT SQUIRT 100
Hodaka conceived, designed and built the Dirt Squirt for exactly that, Dirt Squirts: children who enjoy riding off road. Seat height, handlebar position, suspension and engine performance are all geared for non-competitive pleasure riding. Of course, Hodaka's legendary reliability is built right in. Replace the steel fenders with plastic ones and ride on.
BENELLI
ROAD TOAD 100
Hodaka is known for its weird names as well as its fine motorcycles, and the Road Toad carries on both traditions. Hodaka's first oil-injected two-stroke, the frog green machine is designed to be much peppier than the Dirt Squirt, with which it shares a similar engine displacement. Fully street-legal, it is also at home picking its way through rocky or wooded trails.
BENELLI
SUPER RAT 100
The Super Rat began as Hodaka's first production racer several years ago. Since then it has undergone many modifications in both chassis and engine. Reed-valve induction helps the engine produce its power. A sturdy frame keeps it in line over the roughest tracks. Heavy-duty alloy rear shocks and slim front forks provide hydraulic control.
BENELLI
COMBAT 125
There was a time when the Combat was Hodaka's entry in the 125 class MX wars. And it was a very competitive entry at that. Still, it was docile enough to be cow trailed. So when it came time to modify the Combat, in order to remain competitive with the rest of the 125 world, Hodaka decided to leave it alone and build a specialized 125 MXer instead. So the Combat remains, and reigns, as one of the finest 125 trail bikes.
BENELLI
SUPER COMBAT 125
This is Hodaka's specialized 125 racer. The engine is a reed-valve screamer with a positive shifting five-speed transmission. The machine is designed to be light and fast. Shoulderless alloy rims keep mud from collecting on the wheels. Available in bright orange only, with a blue frame, of course. Plastic fenders are standard.
BENELLI
250
For a while, we thought we'd never get to see the 250. It has taken a long time to get into production, but the Hodaka people wanted to be sure it was right. The features on this machine begin with an oil-injected piston-port engine and end several pages later with such niceties as a spring-loaded folding shift lever and a chain tensioner. We predict great things for the Hodaka 250.
BENELLI
XL100
The XL is one of the most popular series of dual-purpose machines ever. The first full-sized XL is the 100, which sports a five-speed transmission and a very rugged over-head-cam engine. The exhaust pipe does an excellent job of subduing the sound made by the engine. Trials universal tires and a high front fender make it more readily adaptable to off-road riding.
BENELLI
CB125S
$649
This is Honda's smallest commuter bike. Capable of better than 80 mpg, the CB125S is a sleek around-town special. In order to get performance out of the engine, you have to rev it, but that's what the Honda likes. It'll run all day nearly flat-out and won't whimper at all. And when it comes time to slow down, the mechanical (as opposed to hydraulic) front disc brake brings it quickly to a halt.
BENELLI
CR125M ELSINORE
While several of the "New Breed" 125s have made a dent in Honda's 125 class stranglehold, this machine still predominates. Some of the reasons for its success are its light weight, the slickest shifting six-speed transmission ever, good hydraulic damping in the forks, excellent steering geometry, and a very slim overall package. Accessory speed equipment for Elsinores abounds. 1975 Model Shown
BENELLI
MT125
$785
With both performance and handling a far cry from the 125-class dominating Elsinore's, the MT has never-theless found favor among practitioners of milder forms of off-roading. It has oil-injection, which is a welcome convenience, as well as fully-removable lighting. For those wanting more power, several Elsinore components bolt right on. But for racing, better get the Elsie in the first place.
BENELLI
TL125
$757
This was Honda's first trials bike. But the Big H was not foolish. It offered an optional lighting kit that helped turn this capable trialer into one of the most popular camper's bikes on the market. It is easy to start, requires little maintenance and, like any good trialer, can go just about anywhere. Serious trials riders modify the engine for more displacement and then go out and compete with the big boys.
BENELLI
XL125
$796
Totally redesigned for this year, the XL is Honda's 125 four-stroke dual-purpose machine. There is a new, quieter exhaust system that is up out of harm's way, a larger air cleaner, and a slightly more powerful motor. The fenders are flexible plastic with molded-in color. The XL handles well in off-road situations, thanks to the Elsinore forks and a 21-in. front wheel.
BENELLI
MR175
$923
This is another machine that we've had for a while at CW and of which we're fond. In stock form it can be considered little more than a foo-foo bike. But with a bit of porting and exhaust pipe work it suddenly becomes an enduro contender. Realize, though, that the non-street-legal MR will never be as fast as a 175 Can-Am or KTM; but it is much lighter and a whole lot less expensive.
BENELLI
XL175
$913
CYCLE WORLD staffers had one of these outstanding play bikes for nearly a year and beat the tar out of it. Yet the Honda only asked for a little maintenance and then was ready for more wear and tear. This year, a new exhaust system has increased both low-and mid-range horse-power, while lowering the noise level below its already quiet stage. For dollar value, this ranks as one of today's best buys for the cost-conscious dual-purpose fan.
BENELLI
CB200T
$970
A little larger than the CB125S commuter special, the CB200 is more versatile because it meets freeway displacement requirements in many more states. The engine is a glutton for punishment, yet will deliver nearly 70 mpg when driven more moderately. A mechanical disc brake is found at the front, while a conventional drum brake handles stopping chores in back. The 200 is low and gives the rider a feeling of lightness that, in reality, isn't there. It isn't a bad handler either.
BENELLI
CR250M ELSINORE
$1325
Honda overproduced the 250 Elsinore when it was first introduced. It was thought that it would be a much bigger success than the 125, but the reverse was true. Reluctant to bring out a totally new model until the supply of originals was depleted, Honda has now let the new machine out of the bag. It has revised geometry, gas/oil shocks, an up-pipe and some other more minute improvements. At one time it was the class leader, but now it has to play catch-up. Hopefully, the '76 model will take care of that.
BENELLI
MR250
$1287
Big brother to the MR 175, the 250 also suffers from a lack of power when compared to other enduro machines in its class. Still, it comes with many desirable features, like the forward-mounted shocks, large-capacity fuel tank and D.I.D. shoulderless rims. The exhaust pipe is very similar to that on the 250 MXer, but has a large spark arrestor/silencer at the end that cuts both noise and performance. Because of its untapped potential, the hop-up fanatics will have a ball with this one.
BENELLI
MT250
$1043
Based on its successful CR250 motocrosser, Honda introduced the MT250. This made Honda the only manufacturer in the world to have two 250cc dual-purpose machines—one a four-stroke, the other a two-stroke—on the market at the same time. Some people want the four-stroke for its reliability and economy. Others ask for the MT because it is lighter and easier to hop-up. It's quite a choice to have to make.
BENELLI
TL250
$1058
After doing much R&D work with a couple of American riders, Honda hired Sammy Miller to put the finishing touches on the production TL250s, and to aid in the preparation of the special RL300 works bikes on which Marland Whaley won the U.S. National Trials Championship this year. The production bikes are rather heavy, but the pulling power of the ohc four-stroke engine must be felt to be believed.
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XL250
$1116
There was a lot of speculation as to the eventual failure or success of the four-stroke trail bike as the public waited for Honda to unleash the first XL250 on the market. Obviously, it was a tremendous success. With its unique four-valve head, the XL250 has become one of the most .sought-after dual-purpose machines in the quarter-liter displacement class. It is torquey, economical and easily modified for hard off-road use.
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XL350
$1192
Introduced a year after the successful XL250, the 350 has become a highly coveted motorcycle for enduros and trail riding. But Baja fanatics also find it incredibly well-suited to the rigors of running down on the Mexican peninsula. Due to its smooth power and low compression, cruising about on low-octane or unleaded Mexican gas presents no problems. A modified XL350 recently won the Baja 1000 off-road race.
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CB360T
$1224
For many years, Honda sold more 350cc motorcycles than other manufacturers sold motorcycles. Last year they upped the displacement by 10cc and installed a six-speed transmission in place of the old five. The new sportiness of the 360 helped keep it up there among the top sellers in a market suddenly invaded by the Kawasaki KZ400. The Honda is very popular among commuters.
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CB400F
$1460
Begun as a 350cc Four, the Honda received an additional 50cc, totally new "Cafe" styling and a four-into-one exhaust pipe in one fell swoop. Popular for its smoothness as well as its economy (considering it's a Four), the CB400F set a precedent for Honda and was soon followed by 550 and 750 "Cafe" versions. The disc brake on the front is hydraulically activated.
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CB500T
$1608
After a full year on the market replacing the old 450 Twin, the CB500T seems destined for a goodly amount of popularity. Honda increased the displacement of the 450 by stroking it out to 500. They also added a very plush seat, uniquely done in brown. Mufflers keep the Honda's claimed noise output down to an incredible sub-80 dbA reading. Naturally, the front wheel is fitted with a hydraulic disc brake.
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CB550F
$1825
Another machine that received a displacement increase last year was the CB550. Up from a 500 Four, the '76 model got a new paint scheme and a four-into-one exhaust system for more efficient, quieter operation. As on all multi-cylinder Hondas, electric starting is standard. A flip-up seat yields access to the battery and fuse box, not to mention the tool-kit for minor roadside repairs.
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CB750F
$2186
If you ever take the time to notice, just about every other motorcycle on the free-ways is a 750 Honda. Some are stock, some decked out with fairing, saddlebags and other touring paraphernalia. Some 750s are even being customized as the Japanese make begins to find acceptance among chopper fanatics. All this points to one thing: success. And the Honda CB750 is a tremendous success. The new CB750F will be even more so, thanks to its new exhaust and enticing color schemes.
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GL1000
$2942
Not just awesome in appearance, the Gold Wing is also incredible to ride. While the GL cannot match the plushness of ride available from BMW, Honda has produced the quietest, smoothest engine on the road today. Nothing, but nothing, runs like a GL1000. Dial on the gas and the only way to tell that the engine is running is to watch the tachometer. Handling is good as far as the limited ground clearance allows. Final drive is via enclosed shaft.
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125 CR
$1395
From what we understand, this is one of the finest handling 125s in the world. We didn't get a chance to test one because Husky sold out of these little gems about a third of the way through the year. A true testimonial to their performance, considering the price. Hopefully, next year they'll produce enough for everybody who wants them. And that's a considerable number.
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175 WR
$1495
Complete with magnesium cases, reed-valve engine and a six-speed transmission, the 175 WR is ready to tackle the roughest cross-country sections. An optional speedometer kits turns the bike into an excellent enduro machine. There're even lighting coils suited to Preston Petty lighting specs if you really want to go the whole route.
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250 CR
$1795
Fast is only one way to describe Husky's 250 CR motocrosser. Light is another. Magnesium engine cases, air-box and reed-valve cages for the dual reeds help keep weight down. Husky's own forks absorb jolts up front, while a pair of cantilevered Girling gas/emulsion shocks let the rear end glide over most obstructions. Tank and seat are slim for easy rider movement.
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250 WR
$1795
Designed as a cross-country and desert bike, the 250 WR is a powerful and competitive enduro mount when fitted with the optional VDO speedometer. Again, full-lighting coils are provided. However, tight or slow enduros are not this Husky's forte. It likes to go fast. The faster it goes, the better it handles. No wonder this machine has been a class winner in Baja racing so many times.
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360 AUTOMATIC
$2495
As this Buyer's Guide went to press, CYCLE WORLD had just received the first 360 Automatic for an exclusive road test. Look for it elsewhere on the news-stand. The 360 is a fully-automatic four-speed. It is fitted in a G.P. frame with the latest trick suspension. Husqvarna claims that this will be the bike of the future. But we can't tell yet about the future, we're having too much fun on it in the present.
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360 CR
$1950
The 360 CR is also known as the Heikki Mikkola Replica, named after the Finnish Husky factory rider who took the 500cc World Motocross Championship in 1974 aboard a machine that was nearly stock. With almost 39 hp on tap, the 360 CR never lacks for enough zap. But this year, Husky has broadened the powerband of the reed-valve engine even more. White plastic fenders are standard.
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360 WR
$1950
For the Open class desert hound or enduro freak, Husky's new 360 WR (Wide Ratio) replaces the old 400. The WR engine has the G.P. performance of the CR's, since they are identical except for transmission ratios. A large capacity tank ensures many miles of pleasurable riding before refilling. New model Huskys, especially the WRs, are extremely fast downhill bikes, thanks to low seat height and excellent brakes.
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ME100
$599
Claimed to be the lightest 100cc enduro available, the ME100 boasts better than 75 miles per gallon on the street. The engine is lubricated by an oil-injection system. The possibility of in-gear starts makes the machine better suited to trail riding. High pipe, trials tires and skid plate do the same.
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MS100
$599
The full street-legal version of Indian's 100cc trail bike, the MX100 is an ideal around-town bike for the economical biker. Low front fender and a down-pipe are indicative of its intended use. Street tires replace the semi-knobbies for better adhesion. Saddle is upswept in the back and is done in an attractive checkerboard pattern.
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MT100
$549
From its knobby tires to the high-mounted front fender, this Indian is designed as an off-road play bike, much in the manner of Hodaka's Dirt Squirt. The number plates are standard and invite you to stick on a digit or two and go try a few hot laps around the local race track.
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ME125
$699
The mid-sized bike in Indian's 1976 line-up is the ME125. Serving as either a street or trail machine, the 125 is powered by a radially-finned piston-port engine. The frame is a sturdy double-cradle affair. Side plates are molded to fit between the frame rails, thereby preserving the clean lines of the machine.
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MT125
$695
For the rider who wants the power of a 125, but wants it for off-road use only, Indian offers the MT1 25. Full knobbies are provided with this model. Slim gas tank leaves rider free to move about the machine as he flies across country. A constant-mesh five-speed transmission keeps the engine churning merrily.
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MI175
$799
Top of the line for Indian this year is the new 175cc series. The Ml model is designed as a dual-purpose machine. Street lighting makes it usable for around-town commuting. Knobby tires, skid plate and high front fender help it tackle the boonies like a pro. Exhaust pipe is well-silenced and the levers come with grit covers. Quite a machine for the money.
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MT175
$749
The competitive Indian 175 is the MT. Without any of the street paraphernalia or frills, it comes out lighter and faster than the Ml. Some might even wish to compete on the 175. It should feel right at home on the race track. Indians have won several major racing titles in the world of mini-cycles and. the heritage carries on through the line.
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KE100
$589
A rugged little machine for use in the woods, the KE100 is very popular with campers because of its versatility and quiet operation. It is also street-legal and can be used for a quick trip to the corner store when supplies run low. A new paint scheme makes it even more appealing for '76.
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KH100
$575
As the thriftiest of all street Kawasakis, the KH100 is ready to take its practical owner through town in comfort and style. Not legal for freeway use in many states, the KH100 still delivers surprising performance. Its light weight makes it a breeze to ride. Larger tires and subtle engine and chassis refinements make it more fun than ever.
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KV100
$689
For the rider who likes trailing, yet still wants to be able to bustle busily through town, this Kawasaki wears both hats. Full street lighting is standard, but can be removed for more serious off-road work. A skid plate protects the engine from rock damage. The luggage rack is standard, as are the trials universal tires.
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KD125
$699
Basically, the KD125 is a cross between the KE125 enduro and the KX125 motocrosser. It is designed for operation off road and has a peppy rotary-valve engine and a six-speed transmission. Oil-injection handles the lubricating chores. Knobby tires are standard for better grip in the dirt. This one is built for fun riding.
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KE125
$789
Replacing the KS125 enduro that we found much to our liking, is the new KE series enduro. Apart from new paint and an improved airbox, the KE has better rear shock absorbers for a smoother ride. The versatility of this little 125cc motor is astounding. Servicing is easy. Many a beginning rider will find this machine much to his/her liking. It can also be transformed into a very good serious enduro mount.
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KX125
$890
There was a time when the KX125 was not only competitive, but probably the best Japanese 125 motocrosser. But as other makers proceeded with engine and suspension improvements, the KX remained virtually stagnant. It is a peppy racer, however, and if one cares to start where the factory left off, it can still be made competitive.
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KE175
$889
Styled after the KE125, the 175cc version replaces the powerful, but ill-handling F7 enduro. Electronic ignition, a new chassis and a 21-in. front wheel are just a few of the outstanding features this new machine offers. Again, it can be transformed into a very competitive enduro mount, much in the manner of its 125cc brother.
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KH250
$995
The KH250 is the smallest multi-cylinder motorcycle out of Japan or anywhere else. While all other Kawasaki Triples have disc brakes, the 250 has yet to be fitted with one. A new release mechanism makes operation of the clutch easier and engagement much smoother. Suspension has also been softened up a la the KH400. A new locking gas cap tops an attractively detailed fuel tank.
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KT250
$1185
Kawasaki hired Don Smith, former European Trials Champion, to develop its trials bike. First conceived as a 450, the present displacement was decided upon after the prototypes proved to be overpowered. The KT is slim and very functional, although it does include such conveniences as oil-injection and lights.
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KX250
$1216
Although Kawasaki left its 125 virtually unchanged this year, the 250 has not suffered the same fate. Longer travel forks and a long-travel rear end (featuring durable Kayaba gas/oil shocks, complement an already powerful engine. The Kawasaki is very well balanced and is one of the easiest machines to wheelie. Brakes are incredibly powerful.
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KH400
$1239
Combining good economy with spirited performance is what the KH400 does best. Although not the quickest or fastest machine in its class, it nevertheless rates near the top in all categories. Softer suspension makes the 400 more plush to ride for long distances. This bike is considered Kawasaki's best Triple.
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KX400
$1385
Reduced in displacement last year from the original 450, the KX400 outperforms its predecessor. Handling has been improved at both ends, and the chassis has been refined. Ground clearance is now greater than nine inches, made necessary by the long-travel suspension components. There's a lot of machine tucked away in this baby.
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KZ400
$1185
For a long time, the only manufacturer filling the needs of the mid-size commuter market was Honda with its 350cc twin-cylinder models. But Kawasaki remedied that with the KZ400 "Commuter Special." Soon after it was introduced it became the company's biggest seller and has remained so for nearly a year. Quiet operation and excellent economy are some of the machine's more appealing features.
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KH500
$1576
The 500 Triple was Japan's first superbike. Today, it is much more refined and suited to more than just stoplight-to-stoplight drag races. Many people have come to find the KH500 quite a nice touring machine, yet it still reigns as one of the quickest machines on surface streets. Quieter engine operation and a powerful disc brake add to the appeal.
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KZ750
Fitted with quiet mufflers and counter balancing weights to ensure a smooth, quiet ride, Kawasaki's new KZ750 is an excellent choice for the commuter who likes to have a few extra horse-power on tap for when he needs them. Disc brakes are fitted both fore and aft for easy stopping and more reliable operation in the wet.
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KZ900
$2475
This rocketship of a motorcycle is on just about everyone's list of favorites. At better than a quarter ton, you might expect the KZ900 to be a handful through town, but it handles like a machine many pounds lighter, yet gives a very steady, secure feeling at high touring speeds. Both handling and braking are outstanding. Kawasaki 900s are building a reputation for reliability that is astonishing.
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125 MX
$1325
The versatility of the KTM s begins with the 125 and goes right on up through the line. With a lighting kit installed, it is an enduro machine capable of taking gold medals at the ISDT. Without the lights, it is a very quick, fine-handling motocrosser. Rebuildable gas shock absorbers are fitted to the rear in a mild cantilever (lay-down) position.
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175 SIX-DAY ENDURO
$1495
Without a doubt, the KTM 175 is one of the fastest, best-handling 175cc off-road machines available for sale in the U.S. Few bikes can boast of as many features, such as a chrome-moly frame, magnesium hubs and a VDO speed-ometer (on the enduro model). These machines have won countless ISDT gold medals. A six-speed gearbox ensures a gear for every need.
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250 MX
$1725
Although this KTM, like every KTM, has won many medals in ISDT competition, its greatest accomplishment may easily be the 1974 250cc World Motocross Championship in one of the toughest, most bitterly fought battles ever. Considering the 250's broad powerband, the six-speed transmission might be considered over-engineering, but better too many gears than not enough.
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400 SIX-DAY ENDURO
$1825
In the hands of an inexperienced rider, the KTM 400 can be a dangerous tool. It is designed to win at either enduro or motocross competition and demands that the rider know what he's doing. The designers sure knew what they were doing when they built it. It's got long-travel suspension, good brakes, chrome-moly frame, gnarly Metzeler knobbies and more. A machine for the racer's racer.
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750SF
$2863
Oh, the love and care Italians put into their machinery. From Ferraris down to Fiats, they all show ingenious attention to detail and development. So it is with Laverda's 750SF. One ride and you'll know that this sporty Twin has been bred like few other motorcycles. For touring or around-towning, few do it like a Laverda.
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750SFC
$3520
The SFC is Laverda's highly-successful Production racer. It is fully street-legal and makes a good one-up tourer for those who enjoy a tucked-in riding position. It is also nimble enough not to be a nuisance in city traffic. But basically, the SFC is a machine made to fulfill the dreams of those who live only to wear the toes off their riding boots.
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1000
$3900
This is the world's only production double overhead cam Triple. And it runs just as beautifully as its description makes it sound. Twin disc brakes haul the bike down from speeds only a machine as exotic as this can reach. Ceriani suspension at both ends ensures control regardless of road conditions. The frame is rock steady through turns. The sound that is emitted from the 1000's exhaust pipes is not to be missed.
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MC250
$1595
Famed for its incredible handling and torquey motor, the Maico MC250 has many new features this year to make it even better. A five-speed transmission is now standard, along with new styling and adjustable shock absorber positions. Like all other motocross Maicos, the MC250 is built with only one purpose in mind. . .winning.
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WR250/WR400
$1648
For the cross country/ enduro rider, Maico offers a mildly detuned version of its motocrossers—both the 250 and 400. The lighting-equipped models have wide-ratio transmissions for greater diversity in speed. New, internal-spring forks and large-capacity fuel tanks keep the WRs going long and smooth. The leather pouch atop the tank holds an assortment of tools.
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MC400/MC450
$1695
Both the Maico MC400 and MC450 are top-flight class contenders. The 400 is more common among racers because few can tame the monstrous power of the 450. Long-stroke torque abounds from either motor, and each machine comes with all of the new Maico features, including longer travel (8-in.) forks and a five-speed transmission for '76.
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MORINI 125
Housed in a double-cradle frame is one of the truly surprising European street small-bores. With a claimed horse-power maximum of more than 15, a front disc brake and a close-ratio six-speed transmission, the new 125 from Moto Morini can really be said to be a top-of-the-line performer in the 125cc range. Although the price has not yet been set, expect it to be higher than comparable Japanese models. European craftsmanship doesn't come cheap.
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MORINI 350
$1747
Here's a machine for the rider who wants something unique but not prohibitively expensive. The 350 Moto Morini is a V-Twin with excellent performance attached to a six-speed transmission. The workmanship is very good, as has come to be expected of Italian motorcycles. Another expectation is also met in the handling department, since the narrow engine design allows exceptional cornering clearance, and the chassis responds by holding the machine straight and true through every bend.
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MORINI 350 SPORT
$1985
There are a few of you out there for whom the standard 350 Moto Morini isn't sporty enough. Well, for you there's the 350 Sport. There're low-profile handlebars, a peppier camshaft, more compression and a racier tank and seat. The distributor reports that a front disc brake and electric starting will soon be available.
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TS150
Nineteen seventy-six marks the start of the second quarter-century for Motorrad-werk Zschopau, manufacturers of MZ motorcycles. This East German outfit has produced more than 1,300,000 motorcycles during that period. Two of its models are being imported into the U.S. by East Europe Import/ Export of New York. The smaller of the two is the TS150, which comes in red with black trim.
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TS250
Big brother to the TS150 is the 250 from MZ. Features like a backbone frame and fully-enclosed drive chain are typical of some European street machinery. The front forks have extraordinary travel (7.4 in.) for a street bike. Spartan in appearance, the MZ 250 is very popular in many areas of the world.
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850 COMMANDO
Although Norton, like Triumph, is on its way out of business, there are a whole bunch of these torquey, sweet-handling British machines still waiting to be purchased at some ridiculously low prices. The Norton has electric starting, disc brakes at both ends, and the famed "Isolastic" rubber-mounted engine to reduce vibration. For long-distance hauling, the 850 Interstate model is available with a 6.5-gal. tank.
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250 DESERT PHANTOM
$1595
Here is a purely regional machine, designed specifically for those areas of the U.S. that have desert-like terrain. The engine is detuned from its original MX stage by using a Super Pioneer piston, lowering the compression ratio and installing a heavier flywheel. The overall gear ratios are wider than those of the MX, increasing their suitability for cross-country use.
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250 PHANTOM GP
$1648
When it was originally introduced, CW found the Ossa Phantom 250 to be a very powerful, quick-handling motocrosser with a good chance of becoming a success. But that same year, everyone else came out with long-travel rear suspension. So this year, Ossa has answered the challenge with the Phantom GP. It has cantilevered Betor gas/oil shocks. Now let's see 'em pass her.
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250 SUPER PIONEER
$1595
The chassis for the 250 SP is one of the original Phantom MX frames. It is made of lightweight chrome-moly and houses a stump-pulling piston-port engine. Although we wish the machine were equipped with long-travel rear suspension—as are most of today's modern enduro machines—the SP handles well for a conventionally suspended motorcycle. The tighter and tougher the terrain, the better the Ossa likes it. Also available as a 175.
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350 PLONKER
$1595
In order to stay competitive with Bultaco and Montesa, both of whom were fielding 300-plus cc machines for trials competition, Ossa redesigned its 250 Plonker and enlarged the displacement to 350cc. Already very torquey, the additional power will help make this trials bike really perform. It's painted white with red and green accent stripes.
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RANGER
$1095
This is the ultimate "go anywhere" machine. With two-wheel drive and full flotation tires, the Ranger is at home on a trail or climbing up some incredible grade. Wildlife watchers like this bike because it will go just about anywhere the critters can go, and then some. If a stream has to be crossed, the Ranger will float across on its tires.
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SCOUT
$995
Rokon tells us that it sells many of its fat-wheeled models, (such as the Scout) to foreign plantation owners. They are used to carry pesticides and such to otherwise inaccessible areas. The two-wheel-drive system on the smaller Rokons is truly unique. Spoked wheels and huge knobby tires are standard.
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MX340 GP
$1695
Already a successful winner in the Winter Florida MX series, the 340 GP can be competitive in the hands of a rider who can handle its heft and accustom him/herself to "shiftless" racing. Disc brakes are used to haul the GP down from speed. Long-lasting Red Wing gas/oil shocks deliver a truly plush ride. Non-mudding Sun rims are laced up at both ends.
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RT340 I ENDURO
$1895
This Rokon may not have two-wheel drive, but it has an automatic transmission. A Salisbury torque converter works to deliver the power to the ground while maintaining the engine's rpm at peak performance at all times. You just gas it and it keeps going faster and faster. Front suspension is by Betor, rear by Koni. Disc brakes are standard, mag wheels optional.
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RT340 II ENDURO
$995
Powered by the same Sachs engine that propels all three of the larger Rokons, the RT340 II is an enduro-legal version of the motocross model. Long-travel Betor forks and cantilevered Red Wing gas/oil shocks make smooth riding. Preston Petty fenders are fitted and the bike is painted in red, white and blue. Quite appropriate for an American-made machine.
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PIONEER
$1195
Powered by a model 820 Chrysler two-stroke engine, the Rokon Pioneer has a climbing ability of 45 degrees. There are mechanical disc brakes on both wheels. The footpegs fold out of the way when struck by an obstacle they are passing over. Leading link front forks have adjustable shock absorbers.
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RM100
$859
Suzuki wasn't waiting to see if its RM125 would be a success before introducing the 100. They knew from the start that the 125 would be a hit, but it just took a little longer to get the 100 ready to fly. Now it's here and all you small-bore class hotshoes can get your twitchy throttle hands on one. There are cantilevered gas/oil shocks in back and long-travel forks up front. Plus, the motor makes lots of horsepower for a 100.
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RM125
$925
Officially, there is no new 1976 RM125. Suzuki is no doubt testing and refining at all times, but the RM125 is doing so well right now that there won't be a need for a new model until possibly the summer of '76. As in the manner of all the new RM-series motocrossers, the 125 has cantilevered Kayaba gas/oil shock absorbers that deliver a very plush ride. There's also a factory hop-up kit available that increases the horsepower to within 8/10 of a hp of that of the class-leading Can-Am. 1975 model shown
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GT185
$975
There are a lot of surprises in store for those who get a chance to ride one of the new GT185s from Suzuki. The first is the response of the snappy motor. Second is the amount of abuse that it will take. Finally is the plush suspension (when compared to other sub-200cc machines). Unfortunately, the plushness is a drawback when chasing shadows through a mountain road, but few will really want an economical machine like the 185 to play racer on.
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GT250
$1060
Suzuki's GT250 model is named the "Hustler." A few years ago this was the hottest street bike around. Faster, even, than the Yamaha Twins. But time has mellowed and refined it to the point where it is now much more versatile than just a machine for the stoplight-to-stoplight crowd. Economy is now one of the 250's strong points, along with a potent disc brake up front. Styling is neither flashy nor sedate, but a pleasing combination of conservatism with a few eye-catching touches.
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RM250
$1410
This is a replica of the machine that Willi Bauer took to a 3rd place in this year's 250 World Championship. It features a chrome-moly frame, case-reed induction (called Power-Reed by Suzuki), and lots of suspension travel at both ends. The gas/oil Kayaba shocks yield a very plush ride. . .possibly the best around. And they resist fading very well. This new generation Suzuki motocrosser is already starting to set a few tracks on fire.
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RM370
$1560
Usually, one ride on a good motocrosser will sell you on its merits. But what will sell you on the new Suzuki RM370 even quicker is trying to follow one. And if you're fortunate enough to succeed in keeping it in sight, the machine-gun shower of dirt clods coming off the rear tire ought to keep you at a respectable distance.
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GT380
$1350
This is a superb mid-size bike. Large enough to let you know you're riding a full-size motorcycle, yet light enough to be responsive to the rider's handling wishes. The engine is quiet and very smooth. A large tank makes it easy to run for hours before requiring more fuel. There's also Suzuki's unique Ram Air System for increased cylinder head cooling, and, of course, that outstanding 12 mo./12,000 mi. warranty.
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GT500
$1295
Although its price has risen, this is still one of the very best buys in motorcycling. The GT500 "Titan" is reliable, economical and seems to run forever. At first, no one thought that a big-bore two-stroke could survive, but Suzuki sure proved the cynics wrong. Apart from an attractively restyled paint scheme, a disc brake has been added for increased safety. The 500 is not as smooth as Suzuki's Triples, but for what you pay, you just can't do better.
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GT550
$1695
The 550 is a great machine for those who want performance without the bulk of a big 750 roadburner. With CCI oil-injection, front disc brake and a "balanced" exhaust system, the 550 "Indy" is ready to go anywhere. Styling is new and there's plenty of chrome for sharp detailing. Colors available are deep Forest Green and our favorite, rich Targa Red.
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GT750
$2195
As one of the smoothest machines on the road, the 750 has found favor among the touring crowd, which appreciates its vibrationless ride and surprising reliability. Water-cooling, double front disc brakes and a rubber-mounted engine are more of the reasons for its success. But this year, Suzuki has added a lot more performance. No longer does the GT750 owner have to hide from 500s. Nor 750s for that matter. Still, the machine retains much of its original charm and appeal.
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T160 TRIDENT
Known not only for smart performance, but also outstanding handling characteristics, the Triumph T160 Triple took 1st in the Isle of Man Production race for the sixth consecutive year. With two tanks available, 3.5 and 5.0 gal., the buyer can choose to set his machine up for sport riding or long-distance touring. There are disc brakes on both wheels this year. But remember, Triumph is on its way out of business. You can buy one of these machines very cheaply, though.
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DT100C
$589.50
For the beginning rider, this is an ideal machine on which to get a feel for the sport. Features such as primary kickstarting, oil-injection, a crisp five-speed transmission and trials universal tires will help the first-time or novice rider make it through the woods from point A to point B. As an added bonus, the DT100C is street-legal and can also be used as an about-town commuter bike, although the RS100 does a better job if commuting is your prime objective.
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RS100C
$549.50
A snappy ¡n-town performer, the RS100C is yet another highly economical small-bore from which to choose. Great for a quick hop downtown or for buzzing around on campus from class to class. Even moms like it for its easy maneuverability. It comes in green with colorful tank and side-panel detailing. Oil-injection is standard.
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YZ100C
This is the smallest displacement motorcycle available with long-travel rear suspension, with the exception of the new RM100 Suzuki. The Yamaha achieves its long-travel by using one of its famed "Monoshock" units. And at the front end there is a new pair of forks with increased travel. The transmission has been upped from a five to a six-speed. Shoulderless alloy rims are laced to some of the lightest and strongest hubs around.
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DT125C
$789.50
Next step up on the Yamaha enduro ladder is the DT125C. Based on the tremendous success of the old AT1 125, the highly improved DT model has a tucked-in, through-the-frame exhaust pipe to protect the rider's leg, a 21-in. front wheel for better steering and handling off-road, and some improved hydraulics at both ends. That same positive-shifting transmission that has survived all these years and untold punishment, returns for yet another season.
BENELLI
MX125C
$890
For reasons known only to Yamaha, this year there are two 125 MXers, the MX125C and the YZ125C. Although it does have the new six-speed transmission, as well as the forks and wheels from the 250 MXers, the MX125 does not have a monoshock. Instead, there are a pair of cantilevered gas/oil shocks in back. Because this saves the cost of a totally new frame, budget-minded motocrossers can expect to save money on the initial purchase by choosing an MX125 over the YZ.
BENELLI
RD125C
$639.50
There's quite a bit of performance in this little tiger from Yamaha. The RD125C features reed-valve "Torque Induction'' for a broader, smoother powerband, and a five-speed gearbox to keep the engine churning up in the rpm range where it performs best. There's new paint styling this year, but, unfortunately, no disc brake yet. That's all right though, the drum brake works incredibly well. The 125 is even freeway-legal in some states.
BENELLI
YZ125C
$990.50
Yamaha's most potent and best-handling 125 is the YZ125C. This was the first of the "New Breed" 125s that threatened Flonda's rule in the 125 class. They have definitely found a home for themselves amid the eager clan that are 125 racers. A full line of after-market items are waiting to make this little screamer even faster and better-handling than it already is. A new pipe for '76 keeps noise down without killing the performance.
BENELLI
DT175C
$869.50
Painted in attractive French Blue, the Yamaha DT 175 weighs in as one of the lightest street-legal 175 enduros on the market. Still, such conveniences as oil-injection, 21-in. front wheel and Thermal-Flow reservoir shocks have not been neglected. Although not a high-performance 175, the Yamaha's reed-valve engine is a grunter. There's probably more low-speed and mid-range power coming from that small engine than from any other 175 around. Quite nice to have when all you need to fill your day is a pleasant trail ride.
BENELLI
TY175C
$899
Trials is growing more and more popular every day. Yet some people are reluctant to get involved because they cannot handle a full-sized 250 trialer. One simple solution is Yamaha's TY175. It is appreciably smaller than a 250, not to mention much lighter and definitely more maneuverable. There are those in the trials world who believe that the TY175C is Yamaha's best trialer.
BENELLI
YZ175C
Now here's a machine that will no doubt find acceptance across the country, but for different reasons depending on the region. In the East, where 175 class motocross is very popular, this machine will be a motocrosser. The West, however, does not have such a class at its weekly events. Out here, it will be a lightweight desert machine in the 175 class. Just strap on an accessory fuel tank for long-distance racing and go!
BENELLI
RD200C
$939.50
Right in the middle of Yamaha's two-stroke Twin line is the RD200C. With its disc-brake front end and sleek styling, the 200 is ready for either bopping around town or taking a leisurely cruise down the highway. A 3-gal. tank allows adequate range before refueling. Naturally, oil-injection handles the engine lubricating chores and is easily filled by raising the flip-up seat.
BENELLI
DT250C
$1087
Boy has this thing changed. Not from last year, but from the original DT1 (1968 vintage). There's a new radially-finned cylinder head, a larger fuel tank, conical front brake, Thermal-Flow shock absorbers and a host of other features. If you look at it closely and study the features, you'll soon understand why this is Yamaha's all-time most popular machine.
BENELLI
TY250C
$1087
This last year, New Englander Don Sweet rode a near-stock TY250 to 2nd place overall in the U.S. National Trials Championship. The TY has undergone some improvement over the past year. The engine width has been reduced for easier passage through narrow, rocky terrain. Both the shift and brake lever tips fold back instead of bending or breaking if struck into a stationary object. A new blue and white color combination makes it really distinctive.
BENELLI
YZ250C
Although clearly not a replica, this is the production version of the machine on which Hakan Andersson won the 1973 250cc World Championship for Yamaha. Mono-shock suspension soaks up abuse at the rear, just as a pair of long telescopic forks do up front. The engine is a reed-valve two-stroke breathing through a monstrous 38mm Mikuni carburetor. Fire power is provided by a CD ignition, as is true of all YZ Yamaha models.
BENELLI
XS360C
Yet another machine looking for a piece of the 350-400cc commuter market that was originally the sole property of Honda 350 Twins. Yamaha's Twin almost looks like a Honda, but distinctive tank styling helps you tell the difference. A disc brake is standard on the front wheel, as are the two-tone seat and the six-speed transmission. Constant velocity carburetors feed fuel/air mixture to an engine that is whirred to life by an electric starter.
BENELLI
DT400C
While all of the typically attentive Japanese gizmos and foofooraw are there, one ride on the DT400 will dispel any preconceived notions you might have had as to how such Oriental machines are to perform. The DT400's strongest point is an engine that could grace any European machine. There is smooth tractor-like pulling power from zero rpm on up. . .and a top speed in excess of 80 mph, just for good measure.
BENELLI
IT400C
For the enduro purist, the new IT400 offers a motor that combines the best of both the DT400C tractor power and the YZ400 horse-power. All this comes in a monoshock chassis with a new, longer-travel front fork, off-road lighting (not street-legal), and a huge 3.6-gal. fuel tank for the pre-mix. This machine looks to be headed for a great future in the pure enduro market, as soon as Yamaha notices that it forgot to put a speedometer on it.
BENELLI
RD400C
$1249
The RD400 replaces the RD350, which was an out-standing sport machine and absolute king of 350cc Production racing. What's in store for the 400 remains to be seen, but you can bet that its popularity will be high if you stop to consider such unique features as cast alloy ''mag'' wheels, a six-speed transmission and self-canceling turn signals. There are also disc brakes on both front and rear wheels. If it handles as well as the old RD350 and can do those wild wheelies, then it is more than ready for the market.
BENELLI
YZ400C
Not only is this machine a very capable desert mount and a passable motocrosser, but it rates as one of the all-time versatile play bikes. There is good power through-out the rpm range, peaking out at 38-plus hp as verified by the last 400 CYCLE WORLD ran on the dyno. This year, the rear section of the frame has been modified along with the swinging arm, to give you more travel from the monoshock than ever before.
BENELLI
TT500C
$1345
If you know that you won't be using your play bike to run around town on, then there is greater performance available from the TT500C. Basically, the only engine difference is a less restrictive exhaust system on the TT model, but since it comes without lights, its lighter weight makes it better handling. Yamaha may, in the future, offer a minimal lighting kit for the TT500, but this alone would not make it suitable for enduro use, since the YZ front wheel found on the 500 does not have provision for a speedo drive.
BENELLI
XS500C
Popular for its versatility as a weekday commuter bike with very good economy, and as a weekend play racer, the XS500 is a machine that you can ride briskly all day without hearing a single whimper. Intriguing new styling and “mag" wheels add to the flair for '76. A disc brake has been added to the rear for greater braking efficiency. Longish mufflers keep noise levels down to unobtrusive levels.
BENELLI
XT500C
This is a totally new model from Yamaha. A street-legal 500cc four-stroke Single with cantilevered suspension in the rear and a super-quiet muffler. There's more torque in that engine than most play riders will ever need. Shoulderless alloy rims keep mud from building up on the wheels. Oil for the dry sump engine is stored in the main frame backbone. The filler neck is situated between the fuel tank and the steering head.
BENELLI
XS650C
$1695
Yamaha really stuck ¡t out with this model, and it finally seems as though it has a package worthy of the name on the tank. Much-improved handling, braking and reduced engine vibration will make this big 650 Twin feel more at home on the high-ways. It has a distinctive exhaust note that resonates quietly, yet audibly, from its exhaust pipes. The snazzy new paint styling is typical of the graphic artistry on all the '76 street bikes from Yamaha.
BENELLI
XS750C
Yamaha finally steps into the world of shaft-driven motorcycles that was previously the exclusive territory of BMW, Moto Guzzi and MV Augusta. With disc brakes both fore and aft, "mag" wheels and an all-new double-overhead-cam three-cylinder engine, this could be quite a sport bike. There's also a three-into-one collector exhaust system for greater ground clearance, quieter operation and reduced weight.
[no value]
The Buyer's Guide supplement is not intended to include every single motorized two-wheeled vehicle available for sale in the United States. We kept the minimum size to 100cc, so you won't be seeing mini-bikes or mini-cycles, not will you read about mopeds.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0017.xml
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72
72
[no value]
[no value]
WIL-MAC Products Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0018.xml
advertisement
72
72
[no value]
[no value]
American Heart Association
[no value]
American Heart Association
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0019.xml
review
125
125,126,127,128,129,130
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
KAWASAKI KX250A
Many more improvements than just those that meet the eye.
KAWASAKI
[no value]
KAWASAKI
KX250A
$1216
[no value]
THIS YEAR it wasn’t so easy. Public pressure dictated to the manufacturers that they had to do something to the rear suspension of the ‘75 bikes if they ever expected to sell them. Just about everyone has given in. Long-travel rear suspension is here to stay.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0020.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
HUGON FAIRING & DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
[no value]
HUGON FAIRING & DISTRIBUTING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0021.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH AMERICAN SCHOOL MOTORCYCLE REPAIR
[no value]
NORTH AMERICAN SCHOOL MOTORCYCLE REPAIR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0022.xml
review
131
131,153,174,175,176,177,178,179
JUST PASSIN' THROUGH...
[no value]
A 3000-Mile Peek Below The Border On Suzuki’s RE5
[no value]
Suzuki
[no value]
Suzuki
RE5
$3044.40
D. RANDY RIGGS
PEOPLE WHOSE PRIMARY passion it is to travel long distances on a motorcycle often indulge in what I call “sofa touring,” a sort of derivative of bench racing. They love nothing more than to sit around with friends and talk about old trips and dream up new ones.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0023.xml
review
132
132,133,134,135,136,137
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
MAICO 250 GP
One Gear Short Of Fantastic.
MAICO
[no value]
MAICO
250 GP
$1578
[no value]
SOMETIMES YOU HAVE to diddle with a test bike before it's real1y ready to be tested. Sometimes the diddling doesn't help. We had to mess around with this one, and for a while it didn't look as though anything was going to help. At first we thought, "Wow, this thing sure handles neat, but it doesn't go anywhere."
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0024.xml
review
138
138,139,140,141,142,143
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
MONTESA 250 V75 MX
Last Year An Outstanding Motor Was Hampered By Mundane Suspension. No More!
MONTESA
[no value]
MONTESA
250 V75 MX
$1585
[no value]
IT USED TO BE that you could tell if a motocrosser came from Europe or Japan just by listening to the sound of the engine as the bike raced around a track. Japanese engines “zing,” while European motors “growl.” Then Husky came out with the 360 Mikkola Replica.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0025.xml
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144
144,145
[no value]
[no value]
Harley-Davidson: SX-250
[no value]
Harley-Davidson
SX-250
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0026.xml
review
146
146,147,148,149,150,151,152
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
NORTON 850 INTERSTATE
[no value]
NORTON
[no value]
NORTON
850 INTERSTATE
$1995
[no value]
Norton. Nearly a dinosaur by present-day motorcycle definition, an anachronism to many who do not believe a 25-year-old design can exist among throngs of space age technology and modern day influences. Yet it has existed healthily through the superbike era and come out the other end fairly intact, perhaps proof that things learned over two decades about motorcycle design are not to be forgotten amidst other progress.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0027.xml
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153
153
[no value]
[no value]
CIRCLE INDUSTRIES: CINCHER
[no value]
CIRCLE INDUSTRIES
CINCHER
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0028.xml
review
154
154,155,156,157,158,159,160
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
ROKON 340 MXII
[no value]
ROKON
[no value]
ROKON
340 MXII
$1745
[no value]
DO YOU KNOW what the reaction is from a person who is advised to buy a Ford if he or she is a Chevy fan? How about yourself when someone mentions sashimi and you happen to be exclusively a steak and potatoes advocate? The general response in both cases is usually a full-blown argument, even if the Chevy fan hasn’t driven the car that outdoes the Mercedes (as the commercial would have us believe anyway), or tasted one of the finer Oriental delicacies.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0029.xml
review
161
161,162,163,164,165,166,167
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
SUZUKI RM370
The TM Is Dead; Long Live The RM
REMARKS
SUZUKI
[no value]
SUZUKI
RM370
$1545
[no value]
RAGS TO RICHES stories are always fascinating. We all enjoy Horatio Alger tales of young nobodies who make the long, hard climb from the slums to stardom, from the mail room to the board of directors, from a log cabin to the presidency. But even more interesting are the overnight successes.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0030.xml
review
168
168,169,170,171,172,173
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
SUZUKI RM125
Budget Racing Gets A Shot In The Arm.
SUZUKI
[no value]
SUZUKI
RM125
$925
[no value]
AS THOUGH THINGS weren’t already tough enough in the 125 class, Suzuki has made things even tougher by releasing its snappy new RM 125 motocrosser. Was it really necessary? Suzuki thinks so. And after recalling what the old (although not yet dead) TM125 is like, we have to agree.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0031.xml
review
180
180,181,182,183,184,185
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
TRIUMPH T160 TRIDENT
The British Are Coming... Again! And This Time They’ve Brought Along Electric Starting.
TRIUMPH
[no value]
TRIUMPH
T160 TRIDENT
$2870
[no value]
ALL OF YOU staunch British bike supporters can take a deep breath and relax. From all indications, Triumph is alive and well in the company’s Birmingham-based facility. Bikes are rolling off the production line in a steady flow. Keeping tabs on this up-and-down company has been difficult.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0032.xml
review
186
186,187,188,189,190,191
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
YAMAHA YZC125 MX
[no value]
YAMAHA
[no value]
YAMAHA
YZC125 MX
$990
[no value]
YOU KNEW IT was going to happen. It had to. The success encountered by Yamaha’s Mono-shock racers was too great—both from the racing standpoint and from consumer response—for the little outclassed YZ125 to be over-looked. It was time for a model refurbishing, and refurbished it was.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0033.xml
review
192
192,193,194,195,196,197
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
YAMAHA MX400B MONOCROSS
[no value]
YAMAHA
[no value]
YAMAHA
MX 400B
$1486
[no value]
WHEN IT COMES DOWN to going fast, there is a saying in racing circles that goes, “How fast do you want to spend?” The idea here is that horsepower and handling cost money—lots of money. But life teaches us that for nearly every rule, there is an exception or two.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0034.xml
review
198
198,199,200,201,202
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
YAMAHA TT500C
Stepping Back In Time To Plan For The Future, Yamaha Reintroduces The 500cc Four-Stroke Single.
YAMAHA
[no value]
YAMAHA
TT500C
[no value]
IT WAS NOT long ago that thumpers ruled the earth. The two-stroke was nothing more than an underpowered, smoking, unreliable, noisy contraption. But through refinement, the two-stroke is now enjoying a popularity never before seen.
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0035.xml
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203
203
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0036.xml
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204
204
[no value]
[no value]
Harley-Davidson
[no value]
Harley-Davidson
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19760102_0015_013_0037.xml