Issue: 19750102

Thursday, January 2, 1975
January
13
True
14
Thursday, August 21, 2014
12/10/2014 8:32:51 PM

Articles
cover
1
1
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CYCLE WORLD
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0001.xml
advertisement
2
2
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Bavarian Motor Works
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Bavarian Motor Works
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0002.xml
masthead
3
3
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Masthead
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0003.xml
tableOfContents
3
3
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CYCLE WORLD
'75 ROAD TEST ANNUAL & BUYER'S GUIDE
COMPARISON TESTS
ROAD TESTS
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0004.xml
review
4
4,5,6,7,8,9
Cycle World Road Test
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BENELLI 750 SEI
[no value]
BENELLI
[no value]
BENELLI
750 SEI
[no value]
COUNT TO SIX. One, two, three, four, five, six. Now count backwards, six, five, four, three, two, one. Think of those numbers as cylinders...cylinders in a motorcycle, all in a row, rumbling down there beneath you. Think real hard about that...a six cylinder motorcycle.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0005.xml
review
10
10,11,12,13,14,15
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
BMW R90S
Overlooking The Superlatives Found On The R90 Sport Is Difficult... And Overlooking The Price Is Impossible.
BMW
[no value]
BMW
[no value]
BMW
R90S
$3430
[no value]
IT IS surprising, to be sure, and yet, BMW's new R90S, despite a price tag of nearly $3500 (which mean an out the door price of over $3800 in most areas), is being scooped up in remarkable numbers by a lot of buyers. Butler and Smith, BMW's U.S. Importer, expects to sell each and every Sport model it can bring into the country this year, and that's saying a hell of a lot.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0006.xml
review
16
16,17,18,19,20,21
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
BULTACO'S 352 JIM POMEROY REPLICA
Look Out DeCoster, Here Comes John Q. Public.
[no value]
BULTACO 352
$1395
[no value]
First it was the horsepower race. Everywhere you looked in motorcycle-related brochures or publications, there they were—the Orientals and the Europeans—all trying to out horsepower one another from the advertising desk rather than from the dyno room.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0007.xml
review
22
22,23,24,25,26,27
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
CAN-AM 250MX1
Penton quality and versatility with a better powerband.
CAN-AM
[no value]
CAN-AM
250MX1
$1395
[no value]
VALCOURT, QUEBEC, CANADA is a company town. A Bombardier town. But you'd never know it driving through. There are ranch-style houses randomly situated in the rolling countryside. There are occasional barns whose architecture exemplifies decades past.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0008.xml
review
28
28,29,30,31,32
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
HUSQVARNA 250 CR
Numerous Magnesium Components, Reed Valving, And Forward-Mounted Rear Shocks Make This One Machine Experts Can Earn A Living On!
HUSQVARNA
[no value]
HUSQVARNA
250CR
HUSQVARNA
[no value]
$1475.00
[no value]
TO BEGIN WITH, there is no way that anyone is ever going to be able to buy a "works" motocrosser over the counter. No matter how trick, how fast, how light, or how ingenious a works motorcycle may be, by the time it gets to be a production unit, it is outdated by the latest factory effort.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0009.xml
review
33
33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50
CYCLE COMPARISON TEST
[no value]
MOTOCROSS COMPARISON 125s From The Big Four
ABOUT THE PROCEDURE
THE MACHINES HONDA CR125
KAWASAKI KX125
SUZUKI TM 125
YAMAHA YZ125
SCORING
HONDA CR125
KAWASAKI KX125
SUZUKI TM125
YAMAHA YZ125
NOTES
IN THE END
HONDA
[no value]
HONDA
CR 125
$880
HONDA
KX 125
$840
HONDA
TM125
$795
HONDA
YZ125
$967
[no value]
THERE'S NO doubt about it. The Japanese have been the most instrumental power in bringing the world of small-bore off-road racing to its present level in the United States. Even way back when Yamaha Trailmaster 80s and Honda S90s were bouncing their semi-modified selves around the boonies, things were beginning to take shape.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0010.xml
advertisement
51
51
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Advertisement
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0011.xml
review
52
52,53,54,55,56,57
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
KAWASAKI KX250
Stylish, Competitive, Priced Right, Only A Few Minor IIIs. Kawasaki's First Effort Is More Than Just Another Motocrosser.
Kawasaki
[no value]
Kawasaki
[no value]
Kawasaki
KX250
$1150
[no value]
POKER, IF YOU don't already know, is a game of both patience and action. Players are dealt cards, and play them out, bidding according to their value and the odds of someone else having something better. Poker is also a game that should be familiar to just about every motorcyclist.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0012.xml
review
58
58,59,60,61,62,63
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
LAVERDA 1000
2,138,364 Is A Lot Of LIRE. In Fact lt's Too Much—Even For The Best.
LAVERDA
[no value]
LAVERDA
1000
[no value]
AS FAR AS big bores go, Threes and Fours command the most attention. There's no doubt it. Triumph got the idea first and their mellow pushrod Trident out on the showroom floor. But the styling was off and the public didn't bite. Then the Japanese multis hit the U.S. and that left the anti-rising sun bike element little choice in the way of a michine.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0013.xml
advertisement
64
64,65
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HONDA
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HONDA
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0014.xml
review
66
66,67,68,69,70,71
Cycle World Road Test
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MAICO 250 GP
One Gear Short Of Fantastic.
MAICO
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MAICO
250 GP
$1578
[no value]
SOMETIMES YOU HAVE to diddle with a test bike before it's really ready to be tested Sometimes the diddling doesn't help. We had to mess around with this one, and for a while it didn't look as though anything was going to help.At first we thought, "Wow, this thing sure handles neat, but it doesn't go anywhere.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0015.xml
advertisement
72
72,73
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Kawasaki
[no value]
Kawasaki
[no value]
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0016.xml
review
74
74,75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90,91,92,93,94,95,96,97,98,99,100,101,102,103,104,105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124
[no value]
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BUYERS GUIDE TO THE 1975 MODELS
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BENELLI
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BENELLI
250 PHANTOM
$1349
Precisely what you'd expect from a two-stroke light Twin. There's snappy performance, nimble, quick handling that breeds a lot of cornering confidence, and fairly clean styling. Italian influence dictates snazzy Borrani rims, Marzocchi suspension and Pirelli tires. At the Isle of Man, a Phantom took the team trophy in Production class racing. A major flaw is the lack of automatic oil-injection.
BENELLI
650 TORNADO S
$2199
An extremely responsive and satisfying vertical Twin. The five-speed gearbox is a plus, as is a rigid, alloy steel frame that exhibits no flex in hard running. Ceriani shocks and Marzocchi forks control the bumps and there're electric starting, Borrani rims and a four-leading-shoe front brake. It's a very nice motorcycle that is different in an almost classic way.
BENELLI
500 QUATTRO
$2875
Though Benelli has several models for sale in this country below 100cc, the image is going to be created by machines such as this. A better copy of a Honda 500 Four could not be built. Despite the fact that it lacks certain refinements such as a front disc brake, steering and handling have that definite European twist. . .meaning they work very well. We spent some time on one in Italy and are glad to hear that the machine's finally at the dealers.
BENELLI
750 SEI
$3995
There is a Ferrari in the world of motorcycles! Second only to the Suzuki Rotary in terms of smoothness, the in-line ohc Six features electric starting, three Dell'Orto carburetors and a sound all its own! Handling is quite good for such a large motorcycle, but ground clearance is limited due to the width of the exquisite engine. Front double disc brakes slow the Six's progress admirably when needed, and overall finish and quality are respectable. Stying fits the uniqueness of the machine.
BENELLI
R60/6
$2550
When BMW produced its first motorcycle in 1923, the goal was the same as it is today: to build a reliable, prestigious motorcycle that performs superbly. BMW's smallest bike, the 600, does just that. Although not up to superbike performance, it'll break 100 mph, travel across a continent effortlessly and deliver amazing fuel economy. But it lacks the disc brake of its larger brothers.
BENELLI
R90/6
$3195
Recently tested in CW, the 90/6 amazed staffers with some incredible passing times and went away the undisputed winner in a touring comparison test. Usually averaging 50 mpg or better, the 900 can be loaded to the brim with luggage and a passenger and headed for just about anywhere. Maintenance is simple and logical, aided by the finest toolkit in motorcycledom and an owner's manual that tells all. But tradittion, along with excellence, does not come cheaply. Resale value, however, remains very high.
BENELLI
R75/6
$2950
This is our favorite Bee Em for straight-up touring. The opposed Twin 750cc engine is the company's smoothest runner, capable of high 13sec. quarter-mile times. This year the 750 shares improvements with the rest of the model line. Things like a newly-designed seat, "human engineered" hand controls, a perforated disc brake and more powerful electrical components are just a few of the items. Even a 5.8-gal. tank is available for those who feel the standard 4.8 isn't enough. And there's lots more.
BENELLI
R90/S
$3695
There is no doubt about it, the Sport version of the BMW 900 is the most astonishing motorcycle ever produced, and it is accompanied by what is perhaps the most astonishing price. It does almost everything beautifully and looks beautiful doing it. In standard trim it will quietly cover the quarter-mile in 13 seconds flat; top speed will better 125 mph; fuel economy tops that of most 500s; and the R90/S offers its riders Grand Touring in the finest sense.
BENELLI
PURSANG 125
$1295
As with other bikes its size, Bultaco 125 sales were hurt somewhat by the popularity of the Honda Elsinore. The latest version, However, won't be taking guff from anybody. The bike is quick and has the benefit of 8.1-in.-travel Betor forks and forward-mounted Telesco shocks with 6.1 inches of movement. A Motoplat pointless ignition is used and the bike comes with a Joresa chain. The red base color has a silver stripe.
BENELLI
PURSANG 200
$1395
Bultaco models all carry frames this year made from Reynolds 5130 chrome moly tubing. The 200 Pursang (which means purebred in Spanish), was formally designed around the demands of TT scrambles. Now it's a full-blown motocrosser. Lightweight, strong Dural hubs are used, along with shoulderless rims. Instead of rim locks, the tire is secured to the rim with retaining screws. The gearbox is a special close-ratio five-speed, operated on the left this year instead of the right.
BENELLI
ALPINA 250
$1295
The famous "Alp" gets an approved new quiet-design spark arrester, left-side shifting and other important changes this year. A longer wheelbase aids high-speed stability and the Betor shocks have more travel. Shoulderless Akront rims are used and drive for the speedo comes off the front hub. There's a special leakproof gas cap and paint is blue with silver stripes. The perfect machine for "woodsy" enduros.
BENELLI
FRONTERA 250
$1569
All new from Bultaco, the Frontera promises to meet the needs of several types of riders. Based around the Pursang motocrosser, the Frontera uses a magneto/points ignition to run its Sherpa-T-style lighting. As Two Day qualifier machines they fill the bill, thanks to a high horsepower engine with a wide-ratio gearbox in a chassis suitable for both lowand high-speed running. The low pipe is protected with a fiberglass skid plate. Ultra-long-travel suspension front and rear.
BENELLI
MATADOR 250 SIX DAY
$1295
As with each of Bultaco's new models, the Matador comes with a full 60-day guarantee, parts and labor included. New owners get a plastic warranty card with their machine that simplifies any problems they may incur. The Matador is the one with the enclosed and waterproofed drive chain, tool pouch on the tank and lots of enduro goodies. Small touches abound, like a trimmed-down right-side engine case for more ground and side clearance.
BENELLI
PURSANG 250
$1495
A feather-light 250 with an impressively broad powerband and excellent suspension. The 55.9-in. wheelbase insures high-speed stability over the whoop-de-doos, yet geometry is such that the bike steers like a dream, either off or on the berm. The bike remains mechanically simple and the Pirelli tires stick like glue on many different types of surfaces. A high seat height, necessitated by the long travel rear suspension, may bother shorter riders until they get rolling.
BENELLI
SHERPA T250
$1295
Little by little, the Sherpa T gets lighter each year. Frame modifications and subtle internal engine changes keep improving one of the world's best trialers. The carburetor is a 25mm Amal, hubs are Dural and the machine is a gem.
BENELLI
ALPINA 350
$1395
This isn't the bike for running flat out across the wide open spaces; it's much more comfortable winding along tight trails, over rocky crags and up stream beds. The trials-like ability is built in on purpose, but the "Alp" is much more than a trialer with a big seat. A wide-ratio five-speed shifts on the left, or on the right if the rider desires. Akront rims are ridgeless and connect via 36 spokes to lightweight hubs whose braking surface is sprayed on. The air filter is now accessible from the side and the tank carries an ample supply of pre-mixed fuel.
BENELLI
FRONTERA 360
$1595
TWO CYCLE WORLD staffers will be competing this year in the ISDT qualifiers and several National enduros on the new Frontera. Identical to the 250 version except for the engine, there's additionally a unique tuck-away centerstand to aid tire changes, a 3-gal. tank with built-in toolbox, and hand grabs welded to the rear fender support tube. It's a special motorcycle that can take on many types of events. This one is red and yellow.
BENELLI
ASTRO 250/360
$1595
Designed especially for American Class "C" racing, the Astro suits the needs of many professional riders from coast to coast. Both bikes will be identical, differing only in engine size. They come standard with two sets of tires (D/T Goodyears, Pirellis) to suit different track surfaces, special Dural spool hubs, nylon-lined cables, cylinder head drilled for compression release, kill button, left or right side shifting and many other important features. Two disc brake assemblies are included, to be installed as the owner wishes. In an attempt to get the best possible braking characteristics and "feel," Bultaco went to two separate suppliers for the discs and calipers. The engine is designed around high rpm running and has a different cylinder, pipe and special Six Days crankpin assembly. The bike is suitable for short track, TT and lightweight half-mile competition in both displace ments.
BENELLI
SHERPA T350
$1395
This big-bore Sherpa nearly upstaged its once more popular brother when riders discovered it worked quite well. Though we don't have photos of the latest model, we can tell you it hasn't been left untouched. Senor Bulto is constantly refining his equipment, and the one who benefits is you. This model uses Betor suspension on both ends, a 520 pitch Joresa chain with chain tensioner and weighs less than 200 pounds, thanks to careful pruning.
BENELLI
PURSANG 360
$1595
Offering all the features of the 250 version, the 360 is Bultaco's Open class machine. The fenders, side panels and tank are made from fiberglass. Rubber blocks in the cylinder fins trim mechanical noise. A slightly larger cylinder bore contributes to the increase in displacement to 363cc from last year's 352. Forks are new, the head contains two plugs and the 4.50 rear tire throws a lot of dirt at the competition.
BENELLI
125 T'NT ENDURO
$1195
It is difficult to imagine any company coming into today's ultra-competitive motorcycle market and making headway of any kind. But Bombardier, world known for Ski-Doo snowmobiles and farm and industrial equipment, has made more than headway. With the Can-Am motorcycle they have established themselves firmly amongst the others with a line of excellent equipment. The 125 T'NT Enduro for example, features oil-injection, flexible plastic fenders and fuel tank, and a potent rotary-valve engine.
BENELLI
125 MX2
$1295
Differences between motocross and enduro versions from Can-Am are few and far between. But there's enough on the MX 125 to let you know what it's designed for. Full Trelleborg knobbies put the horsepower on the ground, while Betor forks and Girling shocks soak up the rough stuff. Suspension has been improved this year and horsepower is up. . .almost hard to believe that a 125 can be this strong. Styling is nearly identical to that of other models in the Can-Am group.
BENELLI
175 T'NT ENDURO
$1345
This is an incredibly quick and fast 175, able to trounce most 250 enduros. The fork angle can be adjusted to suit riders with varying handling preferences, turn signals are well-protected against damage, and rubber blocks in the head and cylinder fins keep mechanical noise low. Oil for the injection system is carried in the backbone tube of the frame; there's a handy dip stick to check the level. The six-speed transmission is a plus on the highway or out on the desert; a larger fuel tank than MX models have insures enough gas for greater distances.
BENELLI
175 MX2
$1445
You won't find a 175 that produces more horsepower than this one. But there's even more to back it up this year. The rear shocks have been moved forward and the frame has been changed. A reinforced swinging arm will take a beating, as will lightweight, magnesium hubs and tough, aluminum wheel rims. What's so unique about the Can-Am rotary-valve Singles is the placement of the carburetor in the normal position, rather than down in the engine case. Fuel is ducted through a special manifold and the result is a narrow, extremely strong-pulling engine unit.
BENELLI
250 T'NT ENDURO
$1595
Riding any Can-Am is an experience, but riding the 250 is a revelation. This one comes with trials universal tires for a safe grip on pavement, although, naturally, full knobbies would be the answer for riders who spend most of their time in the dirt. The downswept exhaust pipe uses up some precious ground clearance, but a reinforced plate protects it from damage. Lights are adequate in output and the machine is comfortable during shorter street hops. Can-Am produces a surprising number of its own parts, including even those lightweight, bendable plastic items.
BENELLI
250 MX2
$1595
This machine produced more horsepower on Webco's Schenk Dynamometer than any other 250 ever tested by CYCLE WORLD. It is an incredibly fast machine, but earlier versions were lacking in the rear suspension department. The latest models will have that rectified with forward-mounted shocks made by Girling. Gary Jones won the AMA 250 National Championship on the Can-Am 250, which lets you know just how capable the motorcycle is. As new as Can-Am is to motorcycling, they certainly have offered a bunch for the enthusiastic buyer.
BENELLI
100 COYOTE MX
$585
Acer-Mex Corporation in Mexico City is a giant plant producing thousands of bicycles and motorcycles each year. Surprisingly, the company was founded by two Germans. The Coyote is a machine sized between minis and full-sized motorcycles. Knobbies and a down pipe are standard.
BENELLI
100 COYOTE ENDURO
$595
This is the same machine as the MX version, but with enough equipment to be enduro-legal. The tow seat height suits shorter legged people and makes the Coyote suitable as a camping bike. The engine resembles an Italian Minerelli mill. There is no primary kickstarting with this one.
BENELLI
100 MARQUESA MX
$823
This is a spiffy-looking fullsized 100cc MXer featuring Betor forks, heavy-duty rear suspension and a full floating rear brake assembly. The carb is rubber-mounted and the engine is radial-finned. The large still air box contains a Filtron air filter element and hubs are conical in shape.
BENELLI
100 RALLY ENDURO
$898
Carabela's model line is surprisingly large and seems to get bigger each year. This is another new addition, with a left-foot shift and flexible plastic fenders. It's endurolegal and has a resettable odometer driven off the front hub.
BENELLI
125 COYOTE ENDURO
$618
No photos are available of this model, but it's identical in appearance to the 100cc version. Enduro-legal equipment, a 17-in, front and 16-in, rear wheel make it a good bike for the first-time competitor in a family-type event.
BENELLI
125 COYOTE MX
$597
This machine is the same compact size as the 100, but with the added power of Carabela's five-speed 125cc engine. Wheel rims are steel; ootpegs are adjustable to suit different sized riders.
BENELLI
125 MARQUESA MX
$875
This one looks serious and very much resembles the styling of the CR125 Honda. Whether or not it will copy the CR's performance would be pure conjecture on our part, since, we have yet to ride this model. The Marquesa uses a quick-turn throttle, sealed air box and transistor ignition.
BENELLI
125 RALLY ENDURO
$925
The Carabela is surprisingly complete for the casual rider who might only need to make a few changes to suit his particular preferences. Riding position on the Rally is good, braking is ample and there is a protective skid plate for the engine. Several important details have not been overlooked.
BENELLI
175 MARQUESA MX
$895
Those clever dudes at Carabela didn't have any 175 pictures to send us, so they took one of the 125s and scratched off the insignia. Such is life. But really, the bikes are just about alike and they look worth taking a spin on.
BENELLI
175 RALLY ENDURO
$975
Yes folks, it's the old "Rub out the insignia on the side" trick in action again, but the 175 is the spitting image of the 125 Rally, except that the power will suit heavier riders and ones who want some more oomph!
BENELLI
200 ENDURO
$996
Lots of nice touches on this one, including a sealed air box, flexo fenders, lighting, deep padded seat and a tough little engine. But it should have a five-speed, not a four, and many would enjoy the convenience of oil-injection on most of Carabela's models.
BENELLI
200 MX
$923
This one's a for-real picture of the 200 motocrosser, and it doesn't look too bad. The trouble is, 200cc machinery is placed in the same class with. . .you guessed it, the 250 big guns, and there ain't no way this machine is going to cut it against them. So either buy a track of your own and make new rules, or just ride this one around off-road for fun.
BENELLI
250 ENDURO
$1048
Coopers are a product and design of Frank Cooper, the man who distributes Maicos in the Western U.S. Built by Moto Islo in Mexico, the Coops bear some remarkable resemblances to certain Maico traits. The Enduro has a chrome moly frame, complete street lighting and a high-mounted pipe with XDusor silencer. Full knobbies are standard, as are Betor forks and Boge shocks. The bikes lack a few finishing details, like unbreakable plastic fenders.
BENELLI
250 MOTOCROSS
$1048
Lighter and more powerful than its Enduro cousin, the MX tracks straight and true in the dirt. Primary kickstarting and a downswept pipe with silencer are features. Since long-travel rear suspension has become the rule rather than the exception, the Coop suffers some here. Wheel rims are steel and hubs are full width. Neither Cooper comes with oil-injection, but they'll surprise you just the same.
BENELLI
125 STREET
$595
It would be very difficult to find a less expensive fullsized street machine designed for basic transportation purposes. Mileage should range about 50 mpg, there is oil injection and full street equipment that meets the legalities of all 50 states. Color is green and white with red highlights. Primary kickstarting is there too.
BENELLI
175 STREET
$640
Although no photos are available as yet, the 175 looks much the same as the 125, but with a high-mounted front fender and different exhaust system. Engines are similar and colors are the same. And it's very inexpensive.
BENELLI
250 ENDURO
$1199
Based around CZ's older style motocrosser, the Enduro is street-legal, with some surprising touches. There are a number of electrical refinements that greatly resemble those of Japanese dual-purpose machines, and the bike is decidedly different. Shifting is on the left and a large heat shield on the exhaust pipe keeps the rider from getting a hot leg.
BENELLI
250 MX
$1560
Apparently there will be two versions of this machine available this year. One is mostly new and vastly improved by the addition of special long-travel rear suspension and gas shocks. The tank is held on with a strap and the seat is heavily padded. For MX we recommend the new model; for play riding and desert events the older version will do just fine.
BENELLI
350 STREET
Here's a two-stroke Twin for commuting and transportation. Spartan in appearance, but truly unusual; there's even a fullyenclosed drive chain. Passenger pegs, a centerstand and long-travel front forks are featured.
BENELLI
400 MX
$1670
Though the photo is of the 250, the 400 will be identical, with the exception of the size of the cylinder and head. The new generation CZ looks serious; check upcoming issues of CW for the fullblown road test.
BENELLI
GT 750
$2398
Ducati owners are absolutely in love with their machines. And there are plenty of reasons why. Handling is impeccable, power substantial and vibration minimal. The brakes and suspension are built and operate with the sporting rider at the top of the list. But Ducatis need fussing and tender loving care. Funny how they almost always get it from their devoted owners.
BENELLI
750 SPORT
$2498
The Italians have given this one more pizazz to match the demands of the dyed-in-thewool cafe racing man. Riding position is more racy and more uncomfortable; the engine packs more of a wallop since it's fitted with larger carburetors, a higher compression and tougher crank assembly. Marzocchi suspension and nearly unlimited ground clearance will amaze the best of pavement scratchers.
BENELLI
750 SUPER SPORT
Super is the right word for this one. Marzocchi suspension, Borrani rims and a desmodromic-valve V-Twin engine are only part of the package. Double front disc brakes are aided by a disc at the rear; a small headlight type fairing contributes to the sleek lines. Too bad, however, that such an exotic piece of equipment has to be finished off with a green painted frame and a silver paint job that looks as though it was applied with an old brush.
BENELLI
SX125
$749
Harley-Davidson's lightweight line of motorcycles is produced in Italy, and it's a surprise to see the 100cc model once known as the "Baja" dropped from the line. The 125 has to take up where it left off, and that could be tough. The Baja won many races in its day. This one has two rear sprockets, which is really a carry over from long past. Nobody really wants to mess around switching a chain anymore.
BENELLI
SX175
$930
The SX has quite a few good features and several bad ones. There's oil-injection, a quick-change rear hub, centrally-located ignition switch and spark arrester. But the suspension can't cut it off the street and the riding position when standing on the pegs is very uncomfortable.
BENELLI
SX250
$1130
If this machine had been brought out in its exact state in the year 1967, it would have created quite a stir. But it was Yamaha who did the surprising. And now, in 1975, here comes the SX—with its fragile transmission, rock hard suspension, clumsy control levers, steel fenders and difficult-to-removeand-replace lighting system—expecting to cut it against what's on the market today. No way.
BENELLI
XL1000
$2795
Equipped with an electric starter, the XL picks up an additional 40 pounds over its XLCH counterpart. The engine cases are highly polished, along with the aluminum rocker boxes. A matte black finish on the cylinders adds a final touch. Horsepower is said to have been increased this year due to an exhaust junction pipe between the outer pipes, but the exhaust note remains distinctive. Several colors are available.
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XLCH1000
$2675
This is still the bike many men will steal for. Any wonder why so many of these are stolen? It's no surprise that Sportsters come equipped with a theft alarm. The SLCH is still the macho machine it's always been, particularly this one, since it has to be kick started. The front disc brake is a good idea and the machine now shifts on the left, per federal standards.
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FX1200
$2975
Need more machine, yet want to stick with Sportster tradition and flair? The FX is the factory chopped FLH, with a four-speed gearbox, 1200cc of V-Twin throb, and no electric starter. Disc brakes are found front and rear, both hydraulically operated and self-adjusting. Throttle is now self-closing and instruments and switches are clearly marked.
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FXE1200
$3125
Big Harley-Davidsons evoke response from every one. Whether you hate them or love them, you can't ignore them. Their booming rumble will not allow it. Perfect machine for the guy who wants the world to watch.
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FLH1200
$3402
This is the two-wheeled Cadillac. Notice we said Caddy, and not Ferrari, Mercedes, Porsche, etc. There is a difference. Caddies have all the foo-faw, whitewalls, chrome and gizmos. They mush along comfortably and reliably and offer prestige. The other cars mentioned offer precision and high performance for the very demanding. The FLH is the two-wheeled Cadillac.
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DIRT SQUIRT 100
Here's a small machine designed to give big bike feel with the attributes of the little ones. It's an ideal size for beginners, women and short friends. A Wombat frame is used with a shorter swinging arm and, to obtain a lower seat height, smaller wheels and tires are used. Footpegs are self-cleaning and a foam air filter element does a good job.
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ROAD TOAD 100
This second decade Hodaka is fully street-legal and features oil-injection. A dip stick allows the rider to check the oil level in the tank. Toad green paint decorates the tank and fenders. Hubs, frame, engine and handlebars are black and there's an instrument console consisting of a speedometer, resettable enduro-type odometer, and indicator lights. A toolkit fits in a can located under the luggage rack.
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SUPER RAT 100 MX
Departing from the "chrome toaster" styling concept, this new out-of-the-crate MXer is finished in international orange accented with dark blue. The 98cc reed-valve engine breathes through a large still air box fitted with a micronic air filter. D.I.D. shoulderless rims and plastic fenders complement other trick features. Standard equipment are a portable centerstand, mud flaps, toolkit and owner's manual.
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COMBAT WOMBAT 125
Designed in Oregon, Hodakas are built in Japan. The Combat series features an exhaust system totally out of the rider's way, complete with a forestry-approved spark arrester. With a 21-in. front wheel and full knobby tires, the 125 is very much at home in the dirt.
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SUPER COMBAT 125 MX
This is Hodaka's entry for the more serious 125 class rider. Standard equipment includes a CD ignition, close-ratio, five-speed gearbox, reed-induction and alloy rims. Plastic fenders, low exhaust system and a stable 53-in, wheelbase are still more features. Rear shocks are super heavy duty.
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XL100K1
$670
Last year the XL replaced the long-running SL series 100. Designed as a light commuter or trail bike, the K1 now picks up some Elsinore resemblance in the tank and revamped seat. Plastic side panels pop off their rubber mounts to reveal the air filter box and battery. The engine is super quiet and should be even more dependable with an improved crank and main bearing assembly.
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CB125S2
$650
No one ever thought the day would come when a 125cc transportation bike came standard with a front disc brake, but here it is. Unique in that it is cableoperated, the brake is a nice touch. Students will appreciate two-up capacity and locking helmet holder. Servicing is as easy as the CB is on fuel.
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CR125M1
$895
The bike that completely changed the caliber of 125 class motocross racing in the U.S. has a new pipe, piston and cylinder for a broader and stronger powerband. Red paint now accents silver, the seat is more heavily padded, and suspension characteristics have been revised. The frame is formed from chrome moly steel and the six-speed transmission is a beaut. No wonder Marty Smith won the 125cc National Championship with a works CR.
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MT125K1
$770
Under the guise of an Elsinore with lights, the MT in its original form proved to be a disappointment. The problem was lack of power. Honda R&D in the U.S. came up with a solution; hopefully the K1 incorporates the changes. Cleated pegs, quick-turn throttle and offset axle forks are nice to have. Lighting detaches quickly for the dirt, but the brown engine looks out of place.
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TL125K2
$750
Thousands of Honda's first production trialer were sold when riders discovered an inexpensive way to try a new sport. . .trials. They also discovered that the little TL made a fair fun-type trail machine, and one that, with some work, could compete in more serious trials competition. The TL has a special gearbox for low-speed work, new lightweight aluminum rims, better rear shock dampening and new brake shoes that resist water.
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XL125K1
$790
Reliability has become a byword of Honda four-stroke Singles, and this is another that falls right in step. Taking mountains of neglect and punishment in stride, this XL will provide street legality, spark arresting quiet, good mileage and ample performance for the novice riders, lots of uninterrupted fun for others. Color is solid red with black and silver trim.
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XL175K2
$890
Here's the XL that surprised CW staffers in a fourbike comparison test of Japanese 175s last year when it went away with a resounding win. That same XL has been surprising us ever since with finishes in the rugged Greenhorn National Enduro and the famous Barstow to Vegas Desert Classic. The ohc Single blinks nary an eye at the worst of treatment and keeps on delivering riding fun when others have quit. There's plenty of street gear for the around-towner and only a few things are needed to make it really dirt ready.
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CB200T
$950
The ultimate economy commuter bike. Delivering in the neighborhood of 70 mpg, the CB200 offers a mechanical front disc brake, electric starting and room for a big rider. A helmet holder and locking seat are useful, but the ignition switch is inconveniently located under the fuel tank. Rear shocks are five-way adjustable and a document compartment keeps important papers in a safe place.
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CR250M1
$1275
Before the CR250M, Japanese motocrossers were considered a joke for serious competition. But all that changed rapidly when this Honda started winning. Power is abundant, and the torque curve is fairly flat for a 250. Stability is good, but the front end pushes to the outside slightly in berm less turns, and suspension is only average by '75 standards. Still, with slight modifications, it's a winner.
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MT250K1
$1005
Honda was a long time in following the DT1 Yamaha, but they did a good job when they joined the ranks. Cleated footpegs and brake pedal are safe off the road, primary kickstarting is included. Suspension travel is very sufficient. The engine will run with its main competition and match them with features such as oil-injection, full instrumentation and good street illumination. Nitto trials universal tires are a bummer in the dirt.
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TL250
Using a modified XL250 engine, the new trialer from Honda is a product of close coordination with development riders in the U.S. Power characteristics are excellent for both trials and trail use. Quiet, with a built-in spark arrester, the TL250 will dazzle trials freaks with its between-sections speed. Steering is precise and the bike is loaded with good features. And check out that styling!
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XL250K2
$1095
Just about the time larger four-stroke Singles were on their way out, Honda began bringing them back, starting with this model. In a couple of short years the 250 has proven its strength against a beating, when a few skeptics thought its four-valve head configuration might give trouble. The upswept pipe stays out of harm's way and a bigger heat shield protects the rider from burns. The new color scheme tells you it's a '75 model. Strong D.I.D. rims are a plus.
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XL350K1
$1170
A thumper that takes the pain out of living with a thumper. An ideal play machine for riders of all calibers. As a casual street/casual dirt bike, the big XL is amazing. External wear indicators on the brakes keep the rider informed of their condition; switches are more clearly marked. A resettable trip odometer comes in handier than many people think; same goes for the helmet lock. Tire sizes are 4.00-18 rear and 3.00-21 front, but off-roaders will change to knobbies and remove much of the excess weight.
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CB360T
$1230
There's a reason for rubber-cushioned handlebars and footpegs on one of Honda's most popular machines. It's a shaker. But that doesn't stop it from remaining reliable and delivering adequate performance and good fuel mileage. Instrument faces now read in tenmph increments; the sidestand has a rubber tip for self retraction should the rider forget. Big brother calls for all control switches and devices to be labeled after 1975. This one bows to his commands.
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CL360K1
$1170
Really a road bike with high pipes, we hope not too many people are fooled into thinking this is a dirt machine. If the weight, tires and steering geometry don't stop riders in the dirt, the low-hanging center and sidestands will. Motocross style handlebars won't help things a bit either. There's an electric starter with an interlock that prevents starting while the bike is in gear and the clutch is engaged.
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CB400F
$1440
Cafe racer styling dominates this new model for 1975. Replacing the CB350 Four, the 400 carries an attractive looking seat and tank combination, chromed four-into-one exhaust system and a front disc brake. Turn indicator lenses are bigger than ever before and the headlight operates continuously with the engine running, a feature we don't regard as progress. And, at last, Honda has placed the ignition switch where it belongs, up between the new instruments, near the low-style handlebars.
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CB500T
$1550
Remember the 450 Twin? Well, forget about it, because this is its replacement. Remarkable styling sets the 500 off, with a sculptured seat and new tank design. Giant dual mufflers contain a crossover tube resonator for extra sound deadening. Strong performance and responsive handling are a fact, not a false promise. The disc brake has a splash guard that tends to hold water on the disc longer and render it less effective in the wet.
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CB5520K1
$1800
With a finish and paint scheme designed to look like the CB750's, the new 550 is harder than ever to tell apart from its brother. This is one of our favorite Honda Street machines, because it delivers so much in so many areas. The five-speed left-footoperated transmission is an example of smoothness, as is the quiet-running fourcylinder, four-carb engine. Turn signals are now larger, but it's the headlight they should've brightened.
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CB750K5
$2100
There's no success like numbers, and Honda has sold a pile of these big Fours. They'll handle a fairing, saddlebags, luggage and passenger without a groan, despite the fact that more restrictive muffling and air intake has toned down some of the power. Many changes have taken place with the CB over the last five years, which has made it a better motorcycle than ever.
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GL1000
The new GL is remarkable to view and absorb. Double discs at the front, a single disc brake at the rear, the long-awaited driveshaft, an opposed four-cylinder water-cooled four-stroke engine, a radiator that is unobtrusive; even the fuel tank has moved under the seat. What's in what you thought was the fuel tank? A tool compartment, air filter, main electrical connections and fuses, an overflow coolant tank and, for emergencies, a put-it-on-when-youneed-it kickstarter lever.
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175CR
$1445
New in the Husky line-up this year, the CR features special slant-mounted, gasfilled Girling shocks with 7.6 in. of rear wheel travel. The GP style frame comes directly from the World Championship motocross circuit. Everything on the machine has been designed with lightness in mind. The engine is magnesium, frame and triple clamps are chrome moly and there is liberal use of aluminum.
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250CR
$1750
Not stopping where they left off last season, Husky went a step further with this year's CR and went to the latest in GP-style rear suspension with their closeratio models. Left-side shifting, reed-valve magnesium two-stroke engine and plastic fenders are part of the package. A six-speed gear-box is a real plus. Husky fans won't be disappointed.
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250WR
$1650
This is the machine enduro riders have been asking for. Available with an optional lighting kit, this year's wide-ratio machine has last year's CR chassis, suspension and engine with magnesium cases. As a desert racer it will be nearly unmatched and ultra-serious enduro riders will have a lightweight package that really works.
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360CR
$1895
Developed by Heikki Mikkola on the GP circuit, this 352cc motocrosser is virtually identical to the one that carried Heikki to the World Championship last year. The frame is formed from Swedish chrome moly steel, shocks are by Girling and are gas-filled, the transmission is a six-speed unit with an ultralight clutch assembly. With a radial cylinder head and light alloy fuel tank, this one means business in the Open class.
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400WR
$1750
Want to ride a machine like the ones used to win all the famous long-distance off-road events you've heard so much about? This is the one, with shoulderless rims, a new exhaust system, optional competition lighting kit and large fuel tank. Six speeds and long-travel suspension don't hurt things either.
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ME100
$699
Here is the lightest 100cc enduro machine available. The ME is capable of 90 miles per gallon on the street and is quipped with an oil-injection system. Unlike the ML series, the ME is a full-sized motorcycle, though small. Other features include primary kickstarting, a full floating rear brake and adjustable rear shocks.
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ML100
$659
Indian was a very familiar name on the American motorcycling scene for years. . .until the '50s. Then the end came. Now the name has returned, but with a vastly different motorcycle behind it. Still designed in the U.S., Indians are now built in Taiwan. The ML100 is mini-cycle size with motorcycle power. Seat height is a low 28 inches. And it's fully Street legal.
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MT100
$599
This is the 100cc Indian for the racers or off-road play riders in the group. It's a motorcycle sized for youngsters or women; full knobbies and sturdier suspension are part of the package. There're a cush-drive rear hub, strong brakes and steel rims.
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ME125
$779
Since their introduction, Indian motorcycles have been steadily improving in quality and construction details. The 125 is a featherweight and tracks predictably in the rough. Hubs are full-width with 36 spokes in a cross-four pattern. Wheel rims are steel. The seat is ample and flips open; the exhuast system contains a forestry-approved spark arrester. Turn signals aid in traffic and the large taillight can be seen easily from behind at night. Rubber footpegs are adjustable fore and aft.
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MT125
$749
Indian's competitive 125 picks up some horsepower over its enduro cousin. It's also got bigger knobby tires and a conical front hub. The pipe is upswept and silenced, footpegs should be cleated but aren't. There's a washable foam air filter element and the bike will start in any gear. Number plates are standard on all Indian racers.
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MI175
$899
Styled much the same as smaller models in the line, the 175 is Indian's largest entry in the motorcycle marketplace. Around-town performance should be sufficient and off road the bike should be equally at home for casual fun-type riding. There's a skid plate, full-width hubs and trials universal tires. Indians have won several major titles in the world of mini-cycle competition.
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G3 100
$539
Even though the so-called energy crisis is a year behind us, gasoline costs have skyrocketed along with the cost of everything else. That's where motorcycles like this little 100 come in. It'll run along nicely with the flow of traffic, thanks to an additional 10cc tacked on this year; and the mileage delivered is. . .terrific. The G3 makes an ideal beginner motorcycle and has all the convenience features of larger machines.
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G4 100
$663
A new paint scheme decorates the 1975 version of the rugged G4, a bike easily confused with the much different G5. This is a bike for the hunter or woodsman. It features full knobby tires, a high/low gear-box that gives the rider ten usable speeds and a luggage rack for carrying camping gear. Shifting from high to low range requires a stop and a flip of the handlebar-mounted switch. . . that's all. We see lots of these being carried on motorhomes, undoubtedly for use around the campsite.
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G5 100
$549
Here's a compact package for the beginning trail rider who also uses the bike for local transportation. Trials universal tires are a compromise, but can be used in the dirt or on the street with a fair degree of safety. Turn signals are part of the package, but can be removed easily for more serious offroad riding. For this, there's plenty of ground clearance and a skid plate, but beware of those rubber-covered footpegs. The five-speed gearbox shifts smoothly and the engine is peppy.
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KS125
$749
Kawasaki really hit the nail on the head when it replaced the F6 with this one. The CYCLE WORLD staff rates it as one of its favorite small-displacement enduro machines, not to mention one of the toughest. Narrow and light, the KS has all the goodies, such as plastic fenders, strong alloy hubs and an ideal riding position. For a 125, the engine has a surprisingly broad powerband and tough suspension. Coupled with a slick, six-speed transmission and right-on styling, the KS is a gem in its class.
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KX125
At first, a few people disputed our findings in the 125 MX comparison test conducted in our July '74 issue. . .particularly a certain "dirt only" magazine. They said that no way was a KX125 competition for the CR125 Honda. But from all indications, many have now come around to our way of thinking. The KX has a broad, smooth powerband with a terrific gearbox. It's fast and controllable and handles like a small MXer should.
BENELLI
F7 175
$849
The best part of the F7 is its engine. It's a rotary-valve Single capable of giving many 250s a run for their money. Changes have been kept to the minimum for 1975, though the bike could have used a few. Get serious in the dirt and there's plenty of work to be done with suspension; steel fenders should go the way of the blimp, along with the rubber footpegs and inadequate air filter. On the street it'll do just fine
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F11 250
$1089
Two years ago the Fl1 underwent some major changes. A new piston-port Single replaced the former rotary-valve engine; styling was completely redesigned. We like the new paint scheme this year. Also on our like list are a one-key lock system, D.I.D. alloy rims, a comfortable seat and easy-to-remove turn signals that are handy for the off-roader. But we do wish that Kawasaki would see fit to install proper cleated footpegs.
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KT250
Developed by Englishman Don Smith, Kawasaki's new trialer is the best effort we've seen from the Japanese in this type of machine. For trials use it comes pretty close to being "spot on," and the casual trail rider will like the inclusion of oil-injection and removable lighting. It's a very well thought out machine.
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KX250
$1216
Kawasaki entered the motocross game on the late end of things, which both helped and hurt them. In the case of the KX250, they were able to learn from others' mistakes, so they were close to the target with their introduction. The engine has proven strong and reliable and handling satisfies most riders. Too bad energy problems in Japan have put offroad models such as the KX motocrossers well down on the list of production priorties at Kawasaki.
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S1 250
$1018
It's almost hard to imagine a three-cylinder 250, but here one is just the same. The S1 is the smallest multi out of Japan; in fact, it was basically intended for the Japanese market. The price has jumped more than $120 in the past year, but there's still no disc brake in spite of it. Kawasaki has worked to reduce the noise level by redesigning the baffle tube and air cleaner for 1975; and, along with new paint and striping, there's a more readable speedometer.
BENELLI
F9 350
$1164
Over the years, the big F9 has undergone changes too numerous to mention. The end result is a machine with an abundance of power, but little else. Off-roaders won't like hefting around 300-plus pounds of mass. The front suspension has been improved twofold since the Hatta adjustable forks were discontinued, but the rear shocks are still terrible. It's not a bad around-towner because of the ample power; it'll even handle freeway speeds without breathing hard.
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KX400
This is the replacement for the awesome and ill-fated 450 rnotocrosser of last year. The 450's power characteristics were simply too much for most to handle; the 400 is said to be far more tractable, getting much more of its power to the ground. We have yet to ride one, but it will feature many of the same goodies found on the other MX models made by Kawasaki. There'll be alloy, ridgeless wheel rims, lightweight hubs, and plastic fenders.
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KZ400D
$1219
We'll gladly pay more for an electric starter and front disc brake. That's why we feel this is the better of Kawasaki's commuter 400s. Like the "S" model, the "D" suffers from very poor quality suspension and dangerous tires. Engines are identical, but tend to vibrate in spite of balancing weights, though not nearly as bad as the largestselling mid-sized street machine. With a castor of 63 degrees and 3.9 in. of trail, the KZ steers easily around in tight town traffic.
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KZ400S
Though no price has been released as yet, the 400S will undoubtedly be a less expensive version of the 400D, which features electric starting and a front disc brake. This must make it the commuter's special, special. Whatever the reasoning behind offering the four-stroke Twin in this manner, it'll remain a satisfying motorcycle for many. Fuel economy will head towards the 50 mpg mark and honest top speed will be close to 90 mph.
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S3 400
$1197
Turning the Kawasaki 350 Triple into a 400 was one of the best things that happened in motorcycling in 1974. The S3 we tested in CW was one of our favorites during the year. It offers excellent performance coupled with good handling; it's a very spirited piece of equipment. The brakes are strong, styling fits the image and the bike is comfortable even on longer trips. Though our test machine got good fuel mileage, we've heard that most 400s don't.
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H1 500
$1519
This is a vastly different bike than the one that set many on their heels back in 1969; Japan's first superbike is now more refined and somewhat slower, though hardly a slouch. Rubber engine mounts have reduced vibration and the chassis has undergone several important modifications to improve handling. To meet certain new federal requirements, switches are clearly labeled for 1975. Kawasaki claims that their 500 is for experienced riders, and we agree.
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H2 750
Another machine for experienced motorcyclists, the H2 is a top-ranking superbike, if your criterion for that honor is strictly acceleration. This slingshot has had some of the snap taken away in the last two years because of recent noise level requirements, which necessitate more restrictive intake and exhaust systems. Not one of our favorite motorcycles, the 750 gulps fuel alarmingly, vibrates noticeably and has unpredictable handling.
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Z1B 900
$2475
Another one of our favorites. The bike that is capable of mid-12 quarter-mile times and effortless cruising also handles traffic with ease. Fuel economy is another plus. The brakes are excellent, handling only suffers when pushed to extreme limits and styling is beautifully done. A special long-life chain now eliminates the need for a chain oiler and its associated paraphernalia, but replacement (at approxmately 10,000-mile intervals), will be quite expensive. Reliability has proven phenomenal.
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ISDT 250
$1700
Machines built especially for ISDT-type use are usually produced in very limited quantities. For that reason, Laverda's first two-stroke will be a rarity in the U.S. It was developed in the Italian Alps for use in the ISDT by the Italian team, which seems to favor the Gilera. But besides that small point, the 2T has an enclosed drive chain, a chrome moly frame complete with centerstand for easy tire changes, and tiny lights required at the Six Days. Hubs, chain case and engine cases are made from magnesium called Elektron. Suspension is by Ceriani.
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750 SF
$2395
Riding with any Laverda produces an aura of excellence. This year the SF gains some prestige with the addition of dual front disc brakes. The 750 Twin carries Pirelli rubber, Ceriani suspension and Bosch electrics. A 150-watt generator keeps the lights bright right down to the turn signals. Dual horns are enough to blast Fiats right off the road, and electric starting and slick-operating handlebar switches make life easy on the rider who has sport in his veins.
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750 SFC
$3150
Production racers will enjoy this machine; so will the guy in the cafe racer crowd who wants something different. Across the pond the SFC has become wellknown in Production class circles, mostly because it does a good share of winning! If you can live with cafe racer crouch, then the SFC will probably please you. Double discs at the front and a single disc at the rear haul the big machine down from speed.
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1000 THREE
$3400
When Laverda decides to build a double overhead cam, four-stroke Triple, one can only imagine the results. An engine like this in a strong chassis means good riding ahead, and that's what the Three delivers. Dunlop K81 tires keep the pavement scratchers from getting wide-eyed at the wrong moments. Both handlebars and footpegs adjust for different riders and ND instruments are about the best. Long-distance cruisers will appreciate 40 miles per gallon and the five-gallon tank. Everyone else will love the throaty, distinct sound produced by the engine. Like other Laverdas, the Triple uses Ceriani suspension components.
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MC125
The arrival of the Maico in the 125 class may give many of the competitors terminal "Maico worry" disease. If the rotary-valve engine proves strong and reliable, if the six-speed transmission stays together, and if the suspension and geometry follow the traditions set down by the rest of the line, we may see a lot of upsets in 1975. But that's a bunch of "ifs."
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MC250
$1578
Our only complaint with the "works" frame GP250 Maico was the fact that it was saddled with a four-speed gearbox. On certain tracks this can be a disadvantage. Everywhere else, the rider can compete with the best offroad forks in motorcycling and rear suspension that equals anything. Unless you've experienced the traits of a Maico in the rough, we can't even begin to tell you what it's like except. . .try it. There's an enduro version too.
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MC400
$1668
Every Maico is available with a closeor wide-ratio transmission. There're a limited number still equipped with standard rear suspension for sale, as well, though the GP version is far superior for riders in competition. The powerband of the 400 is one of the widest you'll ever sample, and that goes for the one with lights too.
BENELLI
MC450
$1728
In big-bore motocross racing, Maico 450s bring home their share of the gold. The machine is lightweight, but parts are expensive to replace. Rear wheel travel is a full 6.5 inches and the Bing carburetor is fitted with a Twin-Air MX racing air filter. Bummers include fiberglass fenders, slippery footpegs, clumsy hand levers and steel wheel rims. An enduro model is also available.
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MC5O1
$1598
It's surprising to learn what a versatile motorcycle the 501 can be. People have raced them successfully in TT, motocross, cross country and hill climbs. Brakes have been improved and 13.4-in. Koni shocks with 100-lb. springs do just fine. A machine for experts only.
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COTA 123
$970
Montesa has been building trials machinery for some time now, and they're one of the most respected brands in the game. The 123 is a perfect beginner's bike, because it's less expensive, very light and easy to maneuver. It's also enough bike for the rider when he or she gets good. A special 20-inch front tire was developed for the machine by Pirelli. The six-speed gearbox makes the best use of the engine's power.
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COTA 123 "TRAIL"
$980
For the rider not into "strict" trials riding, the "T" model is offered with a larger seat, bigger fuel tank and basic lighting. At a glance the gold panels on the red tank/ seat combination give away the "T" model. The lights will work well around a campsite or pit area.
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COTA 172
$1000
With the sport of trials growing, new classes are being established. One of these classes takes in the 175s, and Montesa has a new model for it. Bound to be a trophy taker, the 172 will resemble the 123 to a great degree. It will feature different rear shocks and minor variances here and there from the 123. Weight will be low, power ample and steering very precise.
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COTA 247
$1190
Long a favorite with trials riders the world over, the Cota (meaning "mountain goat" in Spanish), has undergone many changes in the last two years. There is now a new, lighter frame, better suspension and detail refinements throughout. Campaigned vigorously last year in the U.S. National Trials Series, the Cota wound up 2nd in the final standings with Marland Whaley aboard. It's a beautiful, precision piece of equipment.
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COTA 247 "TRAIL"
$1200
Another new addition to the growing Montesa line, the "T" chases down the market occupied by Bultaco's Alpina. This is the Montesa perfect for picking your way through tight trails and woods. The five-speed transmission now shifts on the left, with braking on the right. The seat is large enough for two people in a pinch, and the lighting will allow the rider to pick his way through the night, should he be caught out on the trails after dark.
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CAPPRA 250 V75
$1450
This is the motocrosser that will be at the top of the heap in 1975. With a fabulous power unit, the right chassis geometry and now long travel rear suspension, it'll be a hard machine to top. Everything about the bike tells you it's ready. The V75 is a much better 250VR, and everyone knows how good that was.
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ENDURO 250
$1450
Based on the new V75 250 MXer, the Enduro has ail the important goodies. Non-mudding rims and full knobby tires handle the traction department. Very special looking Telesco shocks are slanted forward at the rear for super cushioning in the rough terrain. A heavily padded seat takes good care of the rider's posterior. The engine also is pirated from the V75 and will knuckle under and flat get with it when the occasion arises.
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KING SCORPION 250 AUTOMIX
$1250
Montesa was the first from Spain to offer oil-injection and they did so with their Scorpion. Completely street-legal, even in California, the dual-purpose bike has most of the features found on Japanese machines in the same class. With several concessions to street use, it's a surprise to see knobby tires and the lack of primary kick-starting. A few things will bother enduro buffs, but with the addition of the Enduro 250 to the product line, they won't care now.
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RAPITA 250
$1250
A little more than a year late for the energy crisis, the Rapita is a "streetized" King Scorpion. Tires are by Pirelli, the front fender is mounted low and the handlebars allow the rider to crouch down out of the wind blast. Who knows, maybe the Rapita will be timely after all, if the government decides on fuel rationing in the near future. It should be a fun machine, in the tradition of the "basic" motorcycle.
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850 INTERCEPTOR
$2699
One can almost call the Interceptor a dual-purpose street bike, because it does two things quite well. Touring riders will enjoy it on cross country excursions, and sporting riders will love heeling it over on the twisty curvys. The frame comes from the V7 Sport, which, sadly, is no longer being imported. For a power unit, Moto Guzzi looked to its dorado model. The gas tank is 6.5 gallons huge and teatures a unique electronic fuel tap.
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POLICE SPECIAL
If you're into footboards, safety bars, windscreens and the like, here's a Guzzi just like the tax collecting ticket toters ride. You don't get the red lights, siren and radio, but you get dependability from the rugged V-Twin and the worry-free characteristics of a driveshaft.
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ETS 250 ISDT
$1495
In spite of its 290-lb. weight, the five-speed ISDT MZ will cover ground in rapid fashion. There's a very complete toolkit, a tire pump that fits under the large-capacity fuel tank, quick removable wheels, an enclosed drive chain and quite a bit more. With some detailing, weight removal and better suspension, it can perform the most serious of ISDT work.
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TS250
$950
In 1950 VEB Motorradwerk Zschopau produced its first motorcycle. Since then they have rolled out more than 1,300,000 machines. East Europe Import/Export of New York handles both the ISDT model and this street transportation bike. The backbone-type frame and enclosed drive chain are unusual to see.
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350
$1747
The Moto Morinis have a lot going for them. Imported by the Herdan Corp. in Reading, Pa., Morinis offer a rider high performance and superb handling. Several hundred of the machines are now into the country and more are on their way. The Morini is unique because the engine is a four-stroke VTwin, most unusual in a medium-sized machine. Workmanship is excellent and styling should please most. Expect more than 50 miles per gallon too.
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350 SPORT
$1985
If the standard Morini isn't sporty enough, the cafe racer version should be. This one has a hotter camshaft and more compression, low profile handlebars and different tank and seat styling. The bike will top 100 mph, and electric starting and a front disc brake are on their way. The machines are expensive but their features and performance make them very special machines.
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COMMANDO 850 CAFE RACER
$2995
The production cafe Norton gets a new name just a short time after its introduction. Essentially, the machine is based on the Commando, with lots of goodies on top. There are rear sets, clip-on bars, full road racer styling and dual headlamps. It'll turn heads in your direction.
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COMMANDO 850 HI RIDER
Believe it or not, Norton sells a good number of these castrated Commandos, a good indication of how many yo-yos there are riding around the country. How anyone would want to take a beautiful machine such as this—complete this year with a new electric starter and a rear disc brake—and turn it into a piece of bad pop art, is beyond us. Handlebar switches are new too. The exhaust system is quieter and shifting is now on the left.
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COMMANDO 850 INTERSTATE
With hours of riding behind him, the rider on an Interstate is not likely to be unhappy. There's been a lot included on this one for the long distance man. A deep padded seat doesn't hurt comfort, and a giant fuel tank adds miles between stops. With the "Isolastic" ride, the Norton stays smooth and Norton has built a reputation on famous road-holding ability.4.10 x 19-in. Avon tires are used front and rear and gas mileage puts autos to shame.
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COMMANDO 850 ROADSTER
Norton showed us all how a vertical Twin could be isolated from the frame and rider with a unique method of engine mounting. Called "Isolastic Suspension," rubberized bronze thrust washers carry a separate engine/swinging arm assembly. Very little vibration ever reaches the rider. So the bike is smooth, the Twin produces remarkable torque and taking a ride is a revelation. Left shifting, electric start and a rear disc brake are now standard.
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125 PHANTOM MX
$1350
The first 125 to be imported by Ossa was due in the U.S. last year, but it never arrived. Once again promised any day, the 125 is a completely new motorcycle, not a rehash of an old design. By now, many people are familiar with the 250 Phantom. The 125 uses the same chassis and that means a lot of good things if the engine performs up to expectations.
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175 PHANTOM MX
$1375
Equipped identically to the other Phantoms, the 175 runs Betor forks that work well. Betor shocks use 60/90 springs and the choice of five preload positions. Handling is on the quick side, due to the 54.5-in, wheelbase. Styling is snazzy and the seat is plush and comfortable.
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175 SUPER PIONEER
$1350
Due in late March, this new model is a lean, stripped-down bike suited primarily for enduros. Long-range Ossa planning has been to provide a woods version of the Phantom motocrosser; this and the larger 250 version are it. Basically, the machine is a motocrosser with lights, equipped with a wide-ratio transmission. Should be interesting.
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250 DESERT PHANTOM
$1475
Specifically designed for the Southern California market, the Desert Phantom is a general purpose, high-powered dirt machine. With a Pioneer piston, a 2mm head gasket, different timing and a heavier flywheel magneto, the powerband has been broadened and slightly detuned from that of the Phantom MX. The transmission is a semi-wide-ratio unit that aids a rider through slower speed areas and climbs.
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250 EXPLORER
$1217
This model is a Plonker with a few changes to make it a slightly better cow trailer. Betor suspension is used front and rear, a shoulderless Akront rim decorates the 3.00-21 front tire, while the rear Akront is a mud catcher. The fuel tank is larger and will hold 2.4 gallons of pre-mix. Lights are fitted but aren't street-legal, though they're a good way to find your way back in the dark. The seat is larger than the Plonker's and seating position is pure trials, which means it's more comfortable to stand up.
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250 PHANTOM MX
$1395
Back to straight motocross, the 250 version of the Phantom can do business just about anywhere! On the Webco dyno, our Ossa test bike put out a staggering 29.77 horsepower at the rear wheel, making it one of the highest 250s we ever recorded. It also out dragged our Yamaha YZ Monocross time and time again, though it couldn't match it in the rear suspension department.
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250 PLONKER
$995
This is the machine that earned plenty of fame as the MAR (Mick Andrews Replica), but since Mick now rides for Yamaha, the old Plonker name was brought back to the spec sheets. Basically the same machine as when it was introduced in 1972, the Plonker now uses an aluminum skid pan, with very subtle engine and suspension changes. One CW staffer lived with his Plonker for nearly two years without ever changing a spark plug. Sure was reliable.
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250 SUPER PIONEER
$1395
Here is a woods version of the Phantom motocrosser. Using the SDR engine, a unit famous for its low-end pulling power, the "Super" will have a high-mounted exhaust pipe tucked into the frame and out of the rider's way. Rock guards are welded to the chrome moly frame to protect the engine cases from damage in the rough. The lighting system will be direct (no battery), though there will be space provided to install one, should the owner wish. Space will also be available under the seat to carry oil to mix with the fuel, but plans for a 250 Super SDR model with oil-injection are being carried out.
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125 MX,SD, SL
$1098
Every Puch (pronounced "Pook") is all new for 1975. A totally redesigned double downtube frame sports a reworked tank, seat and airbox unit. Fenders are now bendable plastic. Overall weight has dropped. The engine is similar but with important changes. All in all, Puch, an Austrian company, has changed its 125 vastly for the better. The motocross version is pictured; other models include the SD Six Days Replica for enduro work and an SL Street Legal with complete lighting and muffling to meet all state laws.
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175 MX, SD, SL
$1198
Like the 125, the 175 is available in three versions. All are similar, but each meets the requirements of individual riders. Betor forks and Girling shocks are used. Enduro models have a resettable VDO odometer and speedo combination. Puch teams have usually done well in the ISDT, and the newest versions should do even better. Metzeler tires are standard equipment.
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125 MOTOCROSS
An owner would have to perform several modifications to the 125 before he could compete in today's hotly-contested 125 class with any hope of running with the top guns. Front suspension is too stiff. At the rear there isn't nearly enough travel. Couple that with impractical fiberglass fenders, flimsy steel rims and not enough horsepower, and you have a machine more suited to play riding, not racing.
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125 SIX DAY ENDURO
As a street-legal version of the Zundapp-powered motocrosser, the little Rickman is now somewhat dated. The nickel-plated frame huddles between its double downtubes the Zundapp twostroke, an engine that is not that spectacular. Riding position feels awkward; the rider feels as though he or she is sitting on top of the bike, rather than being a part of it. All that red fiberglass is snazzy, until the first endo in the dirt.
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250 MOTOCROSS
Rickman has done a smart thing with its 250 MXer. They've bolted in the enormously powerful Montesa VR two-stroke Single, an engine that develops a broad powerband and features a tough, smooth-shifting five-speed. That engine, in the lightweight plated Rickman chassis, is responsible for some very impressive handling. Betor forks and Girling shocks do an adequate job.
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MX340 MOTOCROSS
$1645
To make a motocrosser out of the Rokon RT340, a lot of trimming had to be done. The severe pruning got the MXer down to 235 lb. dry, which makes for about 6 lb. per horsepower, one of the best power-to-weight ratios around. Non-mudding rims, an unbreakable plastic gas tank and flexible fenders help the situation. Long-travel rear suspension features Koni shocks, while Betor forks are found up front. Fast will be this machine's middlename.
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RT340 Enduro
$1645
A most unusual piece of equipment, to be sure. The Sachs snowmobile engine is hooked up to a torque converter that acts very much like an automatic transmission. There is no shifting or clutch to mess with, just twist the throttle and blast away. The Rokon is very fast and takes some getting used to. After all, there is no engine compression braking. Rokon did well in the ISDT; they're strong.
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ST340 STREET & TRAIL
$1660
Just about identical to the Enduro model, the ST differs because it's street-legal in all the states. The ST is outfitted with turn signals, horn, battery, stop light switch and rear view mirror, even trials universal tires. Tabloc magnesium rims are tough and maintenance-free; Betor suspension and twin disc brakes complete the package. This year even Preston Petty fenders are OEM. We like the new paint scheme too.
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TC100M BLAZER
$640
A bright Aspen yellow color sets off the Blazer, which features a dual-range transmission. The 4x2 gearbox makes the Blazer more adaptable to trail riding, but street-legal equipment has not been left off. Shocks have three settings and the ignition switch is centrally located near the speedometer. A luggage rack is standard equipment, but the rubber-covered footpegs belong on a street machine.
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TM100M CONTENDER
$735
The popularity of its 125 motocrosser prompted Suzuki to go ahead with a smaller version of the same. The 100 class is a great place for kids to start racing, and the TM100M has the goodies they need. Rear suspension has been improved somewhat and the power has been upped. Unbreakable plastic fenders are a plus, as are the strong, aluminum rims that are designed not to collect mud. Rear shocks are fiveway adjustable.
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TS100M HONCHO
$620
Smaller machines such as this one are very popular with youngsters and women. The Honcho has a rotary-valve engine with primary kick-starting and Suzuki's CCI (Crankcase Cylinder Injection). That means the bike can be kickstarted in any gear with the clutch pulled in, and there is no need to mix oil and gas. A low pipe is well protected with a sturdy bash plate, but the TS100 will be happier where it's not too rough.
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RV125M TRACKER
$765
As a specialty two-wheeler, the Tracker is nearly in a class by itself. The 125 Single snaps it along at a nice pace; and this year a dual-range transmission has been added. Fully street-legal, the fat-tired machine can make its way through some rough territory. We think the bike is especially fun in the sand dunes and mud and over rocky terrain. A tire pump and air gauge are standard equipment. The fuel tank is holds 1.2 gal. CCI is included. under the flip-up seat and
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TC125M PROSPECTOR
$770
If prospectors of the old West would have had machines like this one, no telling what might have happened. With the dual-range gearbox they could have climbed trails that would have had their mules bucking. The TC has pre-load adjusters on the front fork springs and five-way-adjustable rear shocks. Although there are provisions for a passenger, they'd be somewhat squeezed. The chromed front fender can be easily damaged in off-road riding, and those rubber-covered footpegs can get awfully slippery when wet.
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TM125M CHALLENGER
$815
This little beauty needs some work to make it really competitive against the tough 125 competition these days. But it's a good buy because of the low initial cost, and a few dollars here and there can help it a bunch. The 17.5horsepower, two-stroke Single has proven reliable in strenuous racing, but most racers do away with the CCI oil-injection system. The top guns in the 125 class run sixspeed transmissions, but the Challenger only has a fiver. The expansion chamber comes equipped with a silencer.
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TS125M DUSTER
$750
Equipped with a speedometer, tripmeter, tachometer and full lighting that includes turn signals, the Duster is at home on paved streets. Offroad it provides nine inches of ground clearance in spite of a downswept pipe, which contains a spark arrester. Brakes are strong enough for the 200-lb. machine, but the lighting should be redesigned so that it can be more easily removed and replaced by the Order who uses the Duster on the street and in the dirt.
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GT185M ADVENTURER
$925
If the high cost of fuel is getting you down, this is the type of machine that can solve your problem. Small and very maneuverable, the 185 is a dream in heavy traffic. The twin-cylinder, two-stroke is a clean runner thanks to the use of CCI. The seat is cushy and the engine is smooth; if you're not on the large side, that means you'll be comfortable. The disc front brake is super.
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TC185M RANGER
$930
There are quite a few dual-range trail machines on the market, but this is the biggest. The 16-hp, 183cc piston port Single has surprising low-end power; couple that with the low range of the special transmission, and there'll be few hills this won't climb! Brakes are strong, but the rear wheel chatters on downhill runs. A spark arrester keeps the forest safe and the rider legal. It wouldn't be a bad idea to carry some extra gas on long runs; the 1.8-gal. tank won't run the machine too far.
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TS185M SIERRA
$875
Backed up by a strong 12-month, 12,000-mile warranty, the 185 Sierra finished a close 2nd in CW's 175 dual-purpose comparison test of April '74. The bike benefited from a 21-in, front wheel that was added in 1974. This is one of Suzuki's best-selling motorcycles; we're not surprised, because it's one of our favorites too. Adjustable suspension, full instrumentation and a strong engine make it a good choice.
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GT250M HUSTLER
$995
A few years back this one was one of the hottest street machines going. It's still quick, but Suzuki has decided to make it more civilized and refined. As a result, the pizazz is gone, but a front disc brake and six-speeds in the transmission keep things interesting. A four-gal. tank will take the machine a long way between fill-ups. CCI? Of course.
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RL250M EXACTA
$1145
Developed by Gordon Farley, Suzuki's Exacta is the company's first entry into the trials bike market. Styling is nice, but we were thoroughly disappointed with the bike's trials performance. The engine needed more flywheel effect, the steering geometry was off, and we heard several reports of frame breakage from owners. Serious trials competitors don't favor the Exacta, and the people looking for a play bike are turned off by the tack of oll-injection and optional lighting kit.
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TM250M CHAMPION
$1175
While Roger DeCoster is out winning races on his ultra-trick Suzuki works machines, the company seems reluctant to put much of what it's learned into production motocrossers. They've revised the rear suspension this time on the Champion, but it still won't do business against the Maicos, Monoshocks and the like. Reliability remains good, however, and the price is a bargain, we suppose, if you don't mind 2nd-place trophies.
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TS250M SAVAGE
$1085
With enough power to comfortably handle expressways and the like for short durations, the Savage does what many of its owners demand of it. And about 80 percent of these same owners ride only on the street, not taking advantage of the machine's dual-purpose capability. The bike works okay off the pavement, but okay isn't enough for some. Trials universal tires, rim locks and a skid plate are only three of its many features.
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GT380M SEBRING
$1295
Here is a really satisfying mid-sized motorcycle. It has a big bike feel, yet with small bike responsiveness and handling. Two can ride comfortably for long stretches; the engine is quiet and smooth. Large oil and gas tank capacities are important, as is the Ram Air cooling that helps the two-stroke maintain its power, even on a hot day. If you're into gadgets, the Sebring has an electronic digital gear indicator. With six-speeds that might not be a bad idea!
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TM400M CYCLONE
$1295
For a real thrill, try the Cyclone. This is the machine that makes mice out of men. Too much power and too little chassis make it a handful for even top riders. Billed as a motocrosser, it comes off better as a play bike for the desert, where there's more room to go out of control. Eat your Wheaties before you ride this one.
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TS400M APACHE
$1230
Definitely not a beginner's motorcycle, the Apache is big, heavy and fast. It needs several changes to make it a worthy off-road machine, but in light duty it does fine. On the street it cruises fairly effortlessly, as well. The power unit features Pointless Electronic Ignition (PEI) and a big Mikuni carb. The air filter is a nightmare to get to, though, as on several of Suzuki's dual-purpose machines.
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T500M TITAN
$1175
Nothing spiffy, nothing fancy...but it'll get you there Clancey! This 500 Twin two-stroke is inexpensive and seems to run forever. Remember the cry, "Big two-strokes don't live!"? The Titan proved them wrong. There are many owners riding Titans and swearing by them. not at them.
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GT550M INDY
$1635
In jet black, the 550 looks very classy. It's more than a bored-out 380, however, so don't get that idea. The 550 has an electric starter, a large headlight and taillight and five-speed transmission. Three pipes exiting the cylinders turn into four pipes for twoon-a-side styling balance, adding weight to an already meaty motorcycle. Ram Air helps performance, and top speed will break 100 mph. Fuel consumption should range in the 40s.
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GT750M LE MANS
$2145
This is the best two-stroke touring machine made. With water-cooling, double disc front brakes and a rubber-mounted engine, the GT is really smooth. Cornering clearance has been improved with redesigned mufflers and centerstand; fuel economy was better with the old style carburetors. There's a temperature gauge, trip odometer and digital gear readout. The gas cap locks, as does the seat. The 750 gets between 800 and 1000 miles per quart of oil in its CCI system.
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RE5 ROTARY
$2475
A big achievement in motorcycle engineering that could turn out to be the Edsel of motorcycling. As a touring machine, which it is, t does just fine. . .unless you start comparing it with some of the others. Then you real ize it doesn't offer the same performance, the same economy or near equal com fort. It is noisy, leaks oil like an ancient Triumph and is styled like a renovated dino saur.
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T150 TRIDENT
$2461
Hopefully, Triumph is back in operation to stay. Machines such as the T150 are too good to lose over labor hassles. This one remains unchanged from its last appearance and at that time it was a good motorcycle. What you read in the ad copy about Triumph bikes being good handlers is very true. The big Triple is plenty fast; this one shifts on the right and has to be kickstarted, but for British motorcycle lovers that means nothing.
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T160 TRIDENT
This is the Triple many people have been waiting for. As the latest generation Trident, the new bike features electric starting, disc braking front and rear by Lockheed, and the engine that ruled road racing in the early '70s. Styling has been changed enough to tell you it's new, without losing the Triumph identity. We like the seat design and the 5-gal. fuel tank option. With new eled switches and controls, plus left-hand shifting, the new Trident should find a home with many new owners.
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DT 100B
$684
Beginners can get a good foothold on riding with the smallest of Yamaha's fullsized enduro line. The stylish little bike is fully street-legal and has some of the same features as the racy motocross models. The muffler is tucked under the seat and out of the rider's way, there's primary kick starting, automatic oil-injection and a forestry-approved spark arrester. The tough engine features reed-valve induction for more power at lower rpm.
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MX100B
$796
Glance at the field in a 100cc motocross event and you're likely to see the pack dominated by Yamahas such as these. Powder puffers adore them, as do young, eager chargers trying to copy Pierre Karsmakers. The 100 comes complete with number plates, flexible plastic fenders, full knobbies and tough wheel rims. The saddle has plenty of padding but is lightweight. There's even oil-injection and Thermo-Flow shocks. A silencer keeps the noise down a bit, but the machine could be a little quieter.
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RS100B
$599
One of Yamaha's new models for 1975 is the RS100B. Undoubtedly a spinoff of the energy crisis, the pint-sized 100 is designed for handy, local city-type transportation. Mileage should be very high, and oil-injection eliminates the need to mix gas and oil for the reed-valve Single. Turn signals are standard, as are a lockable seat, passenger footrests and side and centerstands. Primary kickstarting and a locking gas cap are also featured. It looks just like a scaled down RD350!
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DT125B
$799
It's pretty hard to forget the old AT1 Yamaha from five years ago. Riders all over were swooping up the whitetanked 125s in amazing numbers back then, because they were useful and fun motorcycles. The present-day version bears little resemblance to the old AT, but the concept is the same. Though the bike has picked up a few pounds here and there, it's still small and nimble. Wheelbase is 51.6 in. and there's more than nine in. of ground clearance for off-road use. This is more than a 100 with a larger cylinder and piston; the machine has been beefed-up.
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MX125B
$896
Beginners will like this one; more seasoned veterans of the 125 class will probably opt for an out-and-out serious racer like the YZ. The hubs are tiny and light, the seat has a fiberglass base to save weight, and knobby tires are standard. The attractive paint scheme is "Molly" designed and side panels doubling as number plates snap on and off quickly. Underneath the left one is the oil supply for the Autolube system; the right cover conceals some electrical plugs and the air cleaner box. Primary kickstarting is a plus. So is reliability.
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RD125B
$699
Yamaha 125 Twins have come and gone. . .now there's a new one back on the list. This one is bound to be peppy, what with a smoothshifting, five-speed gearbox that is well-suited to the power characteristics of the engine. Handling will be quick, too, probably ideal for congested city streets. The engine features oil-injection and primary kickstarting; engine case covers are finished in attractive black, and cylinder and head fins have their edges buffed for an extra touch of class. The brakes are strong and there are provisions for carrying a passenger.
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DT175B
$942
175s have been in great demand of late; they fill the gap nicely between the sometimes too small 125s and often too big 250s. For many the 175 is perfect. Yamaha's contribution to this class has enough power to take it to a 65-mph top end and carry a hefty rider with ease. Thermo-Flow shocks are much like the ones found on the motocrossers, as are the forks and plastic highmounted front fender. There's a tach on this one to go with the speedometer that features a forward-backward resettable odometer.
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MX175B
$1095
Very similar to the MX125B in appearance, the 175 offers most of the same features, but with a bit more "oomph." The machine is stylish, lightweight and reliable, but still needs suspension updating. Naturally there's Autolube and several important little touches. It needs a better gas cap and nonmudding rims.
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TY175B
$965
With the sport of trials growing more and more, new classes are opening up all the time. The 175 group is an example. So Yamaha has broadened its trials line with a new 175. This isn't just a 250 chassis with a smaller engine; everything has been designed around a modified version of the engine found in the DT175B. There's even a six-speed gearbox, Autolube, chain tensioner, special trials tires and some basic lighting. Bikes such as this aren't just for trials competition, however. They're great for just having fun, too.
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RD200B
$995
Here's an electric-starting two-stroke Twin for short hops and easy transportation, but its not as frugal as you might think. Its sudden power characteristics and touchy brakes make it rough for beginning riders to learn on. Something a bit more docile would be better for this type of use. RD200s are popular around the country in Production class road racing; they handle well and have the power to compete nicely against their competition. In the hands of an intermediate or experienced rider, the RD200B is a joy to ride.
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DT250B
$1229
The folks at Yamaha have again revised their most popular enduro bike to improve it even more. There's a new, lighter-weight front hub and new forks; engine side covers have been slimmed down to make the engine narrower yet, and they're finished in an attractive black. The fuel tank has been lowered and reshaped for a lower center of gravity. Footpegs are now cleated and naturally are spring-loaded. Standard lighting includes turn indicators that can be removed quickly for dirt operation. The machine that started the offroad revolution is still a winner.
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MX250B
The progress made in the last year and a half in rear suspension systems is phenomenal. And one of the most innovative and successful has been the Yamaha monoshock, now known as "Monocross" The MX250 benefits this year from the set-up, which means there's a new frame to match the new radial-fin engine unit. Aluminum non-clogging rims, lightweight hubs, narrower cases and CDI don't hurt things either. This'll be one of the most popular machines in the class, without a doubt.
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RD250B
$1099
The machine with road racing heritage makes any rider with enthusiasm smile, if that heritage shows up in the street version. In the case of the 250 Yamaha, that's almost an understatement. The engine seems indestructible, power output is more than ample. With a chassis that has no flex and the right geometry, that adds up to a more than sporting piece of equipment. The six-speed, slick-shifting gearbox is helped out this year by a new front disc brake. Machines such as this are what give motorcycles such a reputation for being addictively fun.
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YZ250B
Want a machine even more like the ones factory riders use? If the MX250B isn't enough for you, try the YZ. The engine differs quite a bit from the one found in the standard MX model. In the world's first test of the YZ monoshock, CYCLE WORLD's test machine produced 26.35 hp on the Webco dyno. Not the most powerful to be sure, but the Monocross gets every bit of that power to the ground, which is what wins races for the troops.
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RD350B
$1211
This is the "David" of motorcycling, ready to slay the Goliaths. Capable of low 14-sec. quarter-miles and century-mark top speeds, the medium-displacement Twin from Yamaha will leave quite a few larger bikes in its wake. It has the same features as the smaller 250. Brakes are superb and handling nearly flawless. We like the instrumentation, lighting and overall finish pretty well. The seat could stand to be somewhat softer but all in all it's a machine free of many ills.
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YZ360B
Just the ticket for the person who wants a YZ but doesn't want to ride in the sometimes-congested 250 class. This'll give the Open division riders fits. And they'll know it's coming because of the bright yellow paint and black striping. The trans shifts on the left with a touch of the boot. Giant knobbies claw some of that awesome horsepower into the ground, while the guy twisting the throttle gets wideeyed. For experienced riders only.
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DT400B
$1371
Yamaha's top-of-the-line enduro machine is also their best enduro machine. Presently part of an extended test by CYCLE WORLD, the 400 has not yet ceased to amaze us. In three tough, back-toback enduros in Central and Southern California, the only failure has been a cracked rear fender. Suspension is its major weakness, because both forks and shocks need some work for more serious offroad excursions. But the engine is heavenly, producing more torque than any machine in the class, and that includes the Honda XL350.
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MX400B
$1486
If this machine has the same torque characteristics of its enduro brother, it'll be a blessing to ride. Soon to be tested by CW, the 400 has a giant 4.60-1 8 rear tire, the now famous Monocross rear suspension and the new radially-finned engine for better heat dissipation. There are plastic fenders front and rear, a sidestand and aluminum rims. The airbox and foam filter element are well hidden to keep debris out, but easy to get to and service. We wish they'd change the gas cap though.
BENELLI
XS500B
$1749
Some very sophisticated engineering produced one of the smoothest four-stroke Twins in the business. Eight valves, double overhead cams and a chain-driven Omniphase balancer don't make for an engine that any backyard mechanic can tie into. But time has shown the 500 to be reliable and fairly economical. It has made many owners satisfied. Powerful electrics, a strong disc front brake and good handling help complete the picture.
BENELLI
XS650B
$1889
There's been a lot of effort put into Yamaha's largest motorcycle in the last five years, and it really shows up in the latest version, particularly if you've spent much time at all on earlier models. Frame modifications have aided handling somewhat and the engine doesn't shake as much. Fenders, exhaust pipes and chain guard are chrome, and the engine is brightly polished. There're side and centerstand's, tach, speedometer and electric starting. Expect about 45 miles per gallon and quarter-mile times in the high 13s at about 95mph.
[no value]
The Buyer's Guide supplement is not intended to include every single two-wheeled vehicle imported into the United States. We kept the minimum size to 100cc, so you won't be seeing mini-bikes or mini-cycles, nor will you read about mopeds. Certain distributors or manufacturers were unable to supply us with information on several new models to be introduced shortly.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0017.xml
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125
125
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Advertisement: Cycle World
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CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0018.xml
review
126
126,127,128,129,130
Cycle World Road Test
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MOTO MORINI SPORT AND 350
A Refreshing Departure From The Norm.
MOTO MORINI
[no value]
MOTO MORINI
350 AND SPORT
[no value]
IN THIS GOLDEN age of sameness, it's refreshing to come across something with a degree of individuality...a little distinctness, whether it be a house, an art object, an automobile or a motorcycle. It doesn't happen that often, so when it does, people are apt to be both curious and skeptical.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0019.xml
review
131
131,132,133,134,135,136
Cycle World Road Test
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MOTO GUZZI 850T INTERCEPTOR
[no value]
MOTO GUZZI
[no value]
MOTO GUZZI
850T INTERCEPTOR
[no value]
EUROPE HAS long been known for its spiffy street racer-kitted bikes and exotic production motorcycles that try to copy the looks and, in some cases, the performance of various Grand Prix racing machines. Perhaps the most performance-conscious and race-inspired manufacturers have come from the small and crowded country of Italy.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0020.xml
review
137
137,138,139,142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153
CYCLE COMPARISON TEST
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HONDA XL175/KAWASAKI 175 /SUZUKI TS-185L/YAMAHA DT175
ABOUT THE PROCEDURE
ABOUT THE BIKES
HONDA’S XL
SUZUKI TS-185L
KAWASAKI 175 F-7
YAMAHA DT-175
STREET SUMMARY
IN THE DIRT
HONDA
[no value]
HONDA
XL175
$740
HONDA
175 F-7
$729
HONDA
TS-185L
$795
HONDA
DT-175
$832
[no value]
IF ONE WERE talking about the popularity of the various displacement sizes and categories of motorcycles, e would be one group of bikes standing near the top of the list. These are the Japanese dual-purpose 175s: Honda’s XL, Suzuki’s Sierra, Kawasaki’s F-7 and Yamaha’s DT Enduro.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0021.xml
advertisement
140
140,141
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Yamaha: XS500
[no value]
Yamaha
XS500
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0022.xml
review
154
154,155,156,157,158,159
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
NORTON COMMANDO 850 INTERSTATE
A Reserved English Gentleman? Not A Chance.
NORTON
[no value]
NORTON
COMMANDO 850
$2055
[no value]
THE TERM superbike means a lot of different things to different people. Americans seem to think the prime criterion is quarter-mile acceleration, although a few cafe racing types desire handling in direct proportion to speed potential.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0023.xml
review
160
160,161,162,163,164,165
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
OSSA PHANTOM 250
Short-Coupled, But Fast And Tractable. It Really Shines In The Tight Stuff.
OSSA
[no value]
OSSA
PHANTOM 250
$1375
[no value]
WHERE IS IT going to end? For years the motocross world trundled along in low gear, selling last year's models with different paint jobs as this year's models, changing only minor items like the handgrips or levers from year to year.Then, early last year (about the time that Honda introduced their 250 Elsinore),the volcano erupted and began spewing forth one fine motocrosser after another.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0024.xml
review
166
166,167,168,169,170
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
PENTON 250 HARE SCRAMBLER
An Enduro Bike For Motocross; Or Is It A Motocross Bike For Enduros? It's Both....
PENTON
[no value]
PENTON
250
$1595
[no value]
LOOKING FOR a good 250? If so, ask yourself this series of questions. Would you rather buy one expensive machine that is more versatile than one would normally deem possible? Or, would you rather buy one equally expensive, highly specialized machine for say motocross or enduros, but not both?
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0025.xml
review
171
171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178,179,180,181
CYCLE WORLD COMPARISON TEST
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MAICO 450 VS. PENTON 400
The Purist Emerges Victorious In The Battle Of The Big Guns.
SCORING
MAICO 450 GP
PENTON 400
HANDLING
POWER
PARAPHERNALIA
IN THE END
MAICO
[no value]
MAICO
450
$1728
MAICO
400
$1680
[no value]
ASK AROUND to find out what experts think it takes to make a great big-bore motocrosser and you will probably come up with a cple of different answers. Invariably everyone will mention handling.That needs no in-depth explanation. Good handling is essential to every motorcycle, no matter what the intended purpose.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0026.xml
review
182
182,183,184,185,186
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
SUZUKI TM400
As yet, still untamed.
SUZUKI
[no value]
SUZUKI
TM400
$1285
[no value]
REPUTATIONS ARE funny things. Good ones take years to come by, yet can be destroyed in a mte. Bad ones are earned almost instantaneously, but require years to overcome. The Suzuki TM400 has a bad reputation. Not only has it been said to be a poor motorcycle for its intended use, motocross, but it is the brunt of many motorcycle jokes.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0027.xml
article
187
187
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TAMING THE TM400
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HAVING READ the previous road test, you really shouldn't be contemplating the purchase of a Suzuki TM400, if at the same time you are contemplating motocrossing one. At least not in its stock form. But let’s say that you already own a TM or are going to buy one for use as a play bike, and then one day the motocross bug bites.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0028.xml
review
188
188,189,190,191,192,193,194,195
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
YAMAHA YZ250M MONOCROSS
If You Can't Win On This Bike, You Can't Win.
YAMAHA
[no value]
YAMAHA
YZ250M
$1850
[no value]
WE GET ASKED several times a month, through reader letters or at race tracks while testing, what we think is the best 250 motocrosser avaible today. Our answer has been, "It ain't been built yet." Oh sure, the 250 Elsinore is a bullet and it handles well, but trying to turn one is like trying to roller skate on ice.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0029.xml
review
196
196,197,198,199,200,201,202
Cycle World Road Test
[no value]
YOSHIMURA/DUHAMEL 1000 Z-1
Grab A Handful. . . We Dare You
YOSHIMURA/DUHAMEL
[no value]
YOSHIMURA/DUHAMEL
1000 Z-1
$2950
[no value]
YOU SMILE. Actually it's more of a sneer. "Outta my way you slop-browed dimwit," you mutter to yourself as your new bike gurgles its torquey way up the driveway, around that yo-yo in the blue Ford and into the parking lot at the drive-in you frequented as a teener.
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0030.xml
advertisement
203
203
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HODAKA
[no value]
HODAKA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0031.xml
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204
204
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U.S. Suzuki Motor Corp.
[no value]
U.S. Suzuki Motor Corp.
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[no value]
CycleWorld_19750102_0014_013_0032.xml