Issue: 20120101

Sunday, January 1, 2012
Spring 2012
206
True
2012
Saturday, May 30, 2015
8/26/2015 8:12:04 PM

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1
[no value]
[no value]
aperture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2,1
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
EPSON
Epson Stylus Photo R3000
EPSON
Epson Stylus Pro 3880
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0002.xml
advertisement
2
2
[no value]
[no value]
aperture
[no value]
aperture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0003.xml
advertisement
3
3
[no value]
[no value]
PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART
[no value]
PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0004.xml
tableOfContents
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
aperture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0005.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
Phillips de Pury & Company
[no value]
Phillips de Pury & Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0006.xml
article
6
6
NOTE
[no value]
NOTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The Editors
With 2012 we celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of Aperture magazine’s founding. Such temporal markers commonly demand both a rearview assessment and a forward-looking reckoning, and we have filled our first issue of this year with some of both.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0007.xml
masthead
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
Masthead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0008.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
VERVE GALLERY
[no value]
VERVE GALLERY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0009.xml
article
8
8
CONTRIBUTORS
[no value]
CONTRIBUTORS
TO SUBSCRIBE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EUGÈNE ATGET (1857-1927) is the subject of the traveling exhibition Eugène Atget: Paris, 1898-1924, which opened at the Fundación Mapfre in Madrid last year. DAVID CAMPANY’S books include Photography and Cinema (Reaktion, 2008), Jeff Wall: Picture for Women (Afterall/MIT Press, 2011), and Walker Evans: The Magazine Work (Steidl, forthcoming).
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0010.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
ARTBOOK
[no value]
ARTBOOK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0011.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
L00K3
[no value]
L00K3
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0012.xml
article
10
10,11
REVIEWS
[no value]
THE LIFE AND DEATH OF BUILDINGS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Brian Sholis
During the mid-to late 1960s, photographer Danny Lyon chronicled the "slum clearance" required by two enormous infrastructure projects in New York City: a new ramp for the Brooklyn Bridge and the World Trade Center. The results were solemn portraits of Manhattan's stout brick and cast-iron buildings, the men responsible for bringing those structures down, and, in interior scenes, the accretion of human history and labor those buildings preserved.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0013.xml
article
12
12
REVIEWS
[no value]
UTA BARTH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
James Yood
Early in Jonathan Demme's 1991 film The Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal Lecter instructs Clarice Starling about the processes of obsession and desire—"How do we begin to covet, Clarice?" he asks. "Do we seek out things to covet? ... No. We begin by coveting what we see every day."
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0014.xml
advertisement
13
13
[no value]
[no value]
PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM
[no value]
PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0015.xml
article
14
14
REVIEWS
[no value]
CHARLES ATLAS: JOINTS ARRAY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Howell
Disoriented, distracted, delighted—that’s the sequence of emotions I recall while watching Merce Cunningham’s dances, works that presented a field of activity, nonstop and nonlinear. The dances began as if they had always been taking place, and ended as if they would go on, as if they existed in some other sphere of existence that you’d temporarily visited.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0016.xml
advertisement
15
15
[no value]
[no value]
SAINT LOUIS ART MUSEUM
[no value]
SAINT LOUIS ART MUSEUM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0017.xml
article
16
16,17
REVIEWS
[no value]
MORE THAN FASHION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Vicki Goldberg
Fashion is a very complicated affair, both a reflection of culture and an attempt to influence it, plus class and individual distinctions (the designer's and the wearer's), shifting ideas about women (sometimes approaching misogyny), and varying proportions of art, commerce, sex, experiment, sensationalism, bandwagon, uniform.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0018.xml
article
18
18,19
REVIEWS
[no value]
HARRY CALLAHAN AT 100
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Carmen Winant
When he was a young man, Harry Callahan encountered two very different people, both of whom would change his life. The first was Ansel Adams, whom Callahan met in 1941 through a camera club workshop in Detroit. Adams not only taught the twenty-nine-year-old Callahan a great deal about technical approaches to photographing the American landscape, he also liberated the young man to feel that photography was a livelihood to which it was worth dedicating his life.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0019.xml
article
19
19
REVIEWS
[no value]
MORE AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Melissa E. Feldman
In a kind of curator’s call to action, Jens Hoffmann, curator at San Francisco’s CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, commissioned twelve contemporary American photographers to capture the state of the nation as it weathers the current “Great Recession.”
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0020.xml
article
20
20,21
ON LOCATION
[no value]
PORTFOLIO REVIEW RUSSIA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Anne Wilkes Tucker
International portfolio reviews have been a part of photography's infrastructure since the 1970s, when collectors, curators, editors, and other photographers would sit in the plazas and cafés of Arles during the annual Rencontres looking at young photographers’ prints.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0021.xml
article
22
22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29
PORTFOLIO
[no value]
LIEKO SHIGA OUT OF A CREVASSE: THE DAYS AFTER THE TSUNAMI
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARIKO TAKEUCHI
In 2008, a year after her book Canary was published, Lieko Shiga moved to Kitagama, a village in Japan’s Tohoku region, where she worked as a local photographer. During this time she began preparing an oral-history archive of Kitagama. She also created new works from images that inspired her during her interactions with the town's residents.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0022.xml
article
30
30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37
WORK AND PROCESS
[no value]
ARTHUR OU FRAMEWORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER BENN MICHAELS
From the scratching and painting of the Pictorialists to the scratching and burning of contemporary artists like Marco Breuer, manipulation of the negative has been central—whether embraced or excoriated—to the problematic of art photography.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0023.xml
article
38
38,39,40,41,42,43
THEME AND VARIATIONS
[no value]
The Beat Generation Writers for the Mambo Age
MAMBO IS WHERE WE ARE: JACK KEROUAC AND THE MUSIC
NEAL CASSADY AND THE MAMBO: METAPHOR OF THE MOMENT
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT FARRIS THOMPSON
From 1949 to 1959 was the Mambo Age. Afro-Cuban rhythms blared from everywhere and became the adoptive dance music of the Beat Generation. In the early 1970s the novelist John Clellon Holmes, who had named that generation in a New York Times Magazine article of 1952 (the phrase itself having been coined by Jack Kerouac), wrote to me on the importance of mambo to the Beats: "Mambo was very much of our scene.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0024.xml
article
44
44,45
WANDERING
[no value]
GUS THE BEAR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Sylvia Plachy
Stop and go: always on some journey. My bounty is a photograph or two. I remember what pulled me, an instant of clarity, a moment of perfection, but where was I? Beyond the edge it often fades to darkness: I don't always remember the season or the place.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0025.xml
article
46
46,47,48,49,50,51
ESSAY
[no value]
PRECEDENTED PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID CAMPANY
Photography's rambling, unsystematic past is becoming increasingly available to us—not least the history of illustrated printed matter, which is now easily accessed and uploaded via the Internet and is being studied with growing intensity.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0026.xml
article
52
52,53,54,55,56,57,58,59
WITNESS
[no value]
PAULA LUTTRINGER: ARCHAEOLOGY OF A TRAGEDY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VICTORIA VERLICHAK
Argentina suffered several military coups over the past century. The saga began in 1930 when the country's army toppled the democratically elected government of Hipólito Yrigoyen. A succession of harsh authoritarian regimes followed; but the military dictatorship that began on March 24, 1976, stood out among those regimes, because it imposed state terrorism in its war against a spectrum of the populace, from political activists, trade unionists, students, journalists, and intellectuals to Marxist and Peronist guerrillas.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0027.xml
article
60
60,61,62,63,64,65
ON LOCATION
[no value]
VIVIANE SASSEN: PARASOMNIA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AARON SCHUMAN
Throughout photographer Viviane Sassen's series Flamboya (2002-8), under intense sunlight and amid vibrant foliage, clothing, soils, cityscapes, and landscapes (to which Sassen sometimes adds brightly colored powders and props as well), the faces of her Kenyan, Ugandan, Tanzanian, Zambian, and Ghanaian models are often concealed by heavy shadows, their dark skin rendered truly black and devoid of detail.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0028.xml
article
66
66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73
ARCHIVE
[no value]
EUGÈNE ATGET MUTE WITNESS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEOFF DYER
It is, or was, the photographer's ideal: to be highly regarded— literally, much looked-at—yet almost anonymous. Very little is known about Eugène Atget the man. There are no daybooks or diaries. In books about his work the biographical facts rarely run to more than a couple of paragraphs.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0029.xml
article
74
74,75,76
FILM
[no value]
JOHN TURTURRO'S PASSIONE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Giuseppe Merlino
In his 2011 film Passione, John Turturro takes a careful, empathetic look at Naples by listening to its music and songs written in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He discerns the close and painful relationship between the city and those songs, which he outlines, mixing in his own fashion images, sounds, and words.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0030.xml
article
75
75
EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Beth Gates Warren: ARTFUL LIVES: EDWARD WESTON, MARGRETHE MATHER, AND THE BOHEMIANS OF LOS ANGELES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Beth Gates Warren
Weston was filled with the bravado that comes of a sheltered youth, and as he departed his hometown he was convinced that someday people would know the name Edward Weston. Not long after Weston left Chicago, Margrethe Mather purchased a rail ticket in Salt Lake City.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0031.xml
article
75
75,76
EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Sharon Sliwinski: HUMAN RIGHTS IN CAMERA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lyon Hunt
Sliwinski aims at nothing less than an aesthetics of visual images depicting human rights abuses, trauma, and genocide, that is, an understanding of their logic as images and the way their circulation creates community. [...] (continued on next page) (Human Rights in Camera continued) Most impressive in Sliwinski's approach is her willingness to tolerate ambiguity.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0032.xml
article
76
76
EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Hubert Burda: THE DIGITAL WUNDERKAMMER: 10 CHAPTERS ON THE ICONIC TURN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Hubert Burda
After important philosophers of the 20th century had formulated a "Linguistic Turn" and shown how very much what we think of our world emerges first from our language, we now need to explore what it means that our world is increasingly becoming a world of images: the "Linguistic Turn" is now being complemented by the "Iconic Turn."
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0033.xml
article
77
77,78,79
REMEMBRANCE
[no value]
JEROME LIEBLING, 1924-2011
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Diana C. Stoll
Jerome Liebling, who died last summer at the age of eighty-seven, was a member of a pioneering group of conscience-attuned image-makers whose work and social values helped to define the ethics of observation in our own era. He leaves behind a body of compassionate, consequential work, and a train of influence on the many artists who benefited from his impactful teachings.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0034.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0035.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
PETER FETTERMAN GALLERY
[no value]
PETER FETTERMAN GALLERY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0036.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
GOTHAM IMAGING
[no value]
GOTHAM IMAGING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0037.xml
article
80
80
MIND'S EYE
[no value]
PAUL MULDOON ON R. J. WELCH'S TWO GIRLS SETTING SEED POTATOES, LATE 1890s
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Paul Muldoon
The potato crop is one so closely associated with Ireland that it finds its way into that most archetypical of Irish songs, "Galway Bay," where "the women in the uplands diggin' praties/speak a language that the strangers do not know." This song, popularized by Bing Crosby, was written as recently as 1947 by Doctor Arthur Colahan.
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0038.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
M.R.GALLERY
[no value]
M.R.GALLERY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0039.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
AIPAD
[no value]
AIPAD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_20120101_2012_206_0040.xml