Issue: 20110101

Saturday, January 1, 2011
Spring 2011
202
True
2011
Tuesday, August 4, 2015
8/26/2015 8:02:36 PM

Articles
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EPSON
Epson Stylus Pro 3880
EPSON
Epson Stylus Pro 4880
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0002.xml
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THE SCHOOL AT ICP
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THE SCHOOL AT ICP
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0004.xml
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ARTBOOK
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ARTBOOK
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0005.xml
tableOfContents
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aipad
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NOTE
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NOTE
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The Editors
In 1859 Oliver Wendell Holmes, in his foresighted essay "The Stereoscope and the Stereograph," suggested that the image had finally outmuscled reality: "Form is henceforth divorced from matter," he said. "Give us a few negatives of a thing worth seeing, taken from different points of view, and that is all we want of it."
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0008.xml
masthead
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Masthead
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0009.xml
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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS PRESS
Hard Ground
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS PRESS
Crazy from the Heat
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0010.xml
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CONTRIBUTORS
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VINCE ALETTI is the photography critic for the New Yorker's Goings on About Town section, and reviews photo books in a regular column for Photograph magazine. He was the co-curator of several exhibitions for the International Center of Photography's 2009 "Year of Fashion."
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TO SUBSCRIBE
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Aperture (ISSN 0003-6420) is published quarterly, in spring, summer, fall, and winter, at 547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor, New York, New York, 10001. In the United States: a one-year subscription (four issues) is $40; a two-year subscription (eight issues) is $66. In Canada: a one-year subscription is $65.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0012.xml
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formatfestival
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formatfestival
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0013.xml
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10,11,12
REVIEWS
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MIXED USE, MANHATTAN
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Abigail Solomon-Godeau
Although included under PhotoEspaña's umbrella, Mixed Use, Manhattan, an ambitious and provocative exhibition of photography, film, and video at Madrid's Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, was organized independently of the festival.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0014.xml
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M.R. GALLERY
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M.R. GALLERY
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article
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REVIEWS
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STARBURST: COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY IN AMERICA, 1970-1980
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Laurie Dahlberg
In the 1950s, when Kodak lavished its color films on wellknown photographers like Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, little came of it. The photographers used the products and even half-heartedly shilled for them, but nothing could counter their belief that color photography was the crude instrument of commerce and advertising.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0016.xml
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PALM SPRINGS PHOTO FESTIVAL
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PALM SPRINGS PHOTO FESTIVAL
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REVIEWS
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ENGAGED OBSERVERS
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Sally Stein
Across the political spectrum, from Susan Sontag to John Szarkowski, critiques of documentary photography multiplied in the 1970s, even as the mass-media base for such work was expiring. But despite reduced funding and stature, along with the growing gallery bias for personal vision over social vision, documentary defied the odds and persisted.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0018.xml
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REVIEWS
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VAN LAMSWEERDE & MATADIN: PRETTY MUCH EVERYTHING
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Jason Evans
A list of the most successful fashion photographers in the world today would include Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin in the top five. This was not always the case. In the mid-1990s the pair was responsible for brilliantly disturbing works that utilized emerging digital technology to manipulate images that were intended as "art photography" while referencing aesthetics and gestures from mainstream "commercial photography."
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ART CHICAGO
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ART CHICAGO
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REVIEWS
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FOR ALL THE WORLD TO SEE
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Evan Cornog
On July 4, 2004, an editorial note ran on the front page of the Lexington (Kentucky) Herald-Leader. "It has come to the editor's attention that the Herald-Leader neglected to cover the civil rights movement. We regret the omission." The terse admission was accompanied by extensive coverage of the role of the paper (formerly two papers, which merged in 1983) with regard to the African-American struggle for civil rights in and around Lexington, as well as an article that quoted a local NAACP leader noting that the papers "catered to the white citizenry, and the white community just prayed that rumors and reports would be swept under the rug and just go away."
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22,23,24,25,26,27
WORK AND PROCESS
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GERALDO DE BARROS FOTOFORMAS
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FERNANDO CASTRO
Brazilian artist Geraldo de Barros (1923-1998) began his engagement with photography in the late 1940s, when he was still a young man. He was by then already deeply involved in the thriving art world of São Paulo—his artistic voyage had begun when he was twenty-three, with studies in drawing and painting.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0022.xml
article
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28,29,30,31
FILM
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THE NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES: RED ROAD AND LOOK
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GREIL MARCUS
In the 2006 film Red Road, written and directed by Andrea Arnold, a uniformed woman in Glasgow watches a bank of video screens, scanning streets for trouble. "This is Jackie Morrison from City Eye," she says at one point when she calls police to report—and if City Eye sounds like something out of Batman, by this time the viewer has absorbed enough tension from actress Kate Dickie's Jackie to appreciate the lift, the sense of doing right, that the name might give her, the way it might ennoble, even glamorize a hard, tiring, low-paying, and maybe mostly boring job.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0023.xml
article
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32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39
ON LOCATION
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A FORM OF RECOLLECTION The Architectural Interiors of Luisa Lambri
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SUSAN MORGAN
Since 1996 Luisa Lambri has been producing exquisite images of unoccupied interiors: an empty hallway flanked by an ominous battalion of half-opened doors; ribbons of unremitting sunlight seeping through a tightly shuttered window; an unadorned plaster wall glowing, shadowy and radiant as a full moon.
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ARCHIVE
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PHOTOGRAPHER OF MODERN LIFE CAMILLE SILVY
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MARK HAWORTH-BOOTH
Back in the early 1970s, when many people began to recognize that photography had a secret life as a creative medium, I used to ask fellow enthusiasts if they could recall the moment when they "got it." Usually they could, down to the very book, magazine photo-essay, or exhibition.
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ESSAY
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The Meaning of the Twentieth-Century Press Archive
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Mary Panzer
Early last year, the contents of the Magnum Photos archive—some two hundred thousand black-and-white press prints—were bought by computer manufacturer Michael Dell and his hedge fund MSD Capital, L.P., and then donated to the Harry Ransom Center (HRC) at the University of Texas.
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PHOTOGRAPHER'S PROJECT
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LAVINA
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The Editors
In the late nineteenth century, the Italian photographer and mountaineer Vittorio Sella scaled and photographed the Alps, the mountains that had dominated the landscape of his childhood. Sella worked during a time when wild nature was still regarded as a fearsome place, not a site of recreation.
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56,57,58,59,60,61
MIXING THE MEDIA
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Sara VanDerBeek COMPOSITIONS
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BRIAN SHOLIS
Sara VanDerBeek's contribution to the Museum of Modern Art's New Photography 2009 exhibition was A Composition for Detroit, a quartet of photographs made that year. Like the photographs she had been exhibiting for the previous half decade, it is made up of images of images: each panel depicts a geometric scaffold, erected against a dark backdrop in the artist's studio, to which she affixed reproductions of other photographs, including ones by Walker Evans and Leonard Freed.
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62,63,64,65
ESSAY
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THE LESS-SETTLED SPACE Civil Rights, Hannah Arendt, and Garry Winogrand
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ULRICH BAER
Political theorist Hannah Arendt was not known for avoiding risks. A brilliant thinker who studied with Martin Heidegger before escaping Nazi Germany and eventually settling in New York, Arendt published her seminal Origins of Totalitarianism in 1951 to wide acclaim.
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66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73
PORTFOLIO
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COLLIER SCHORR BOTH SIDES NOW
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Vince Aletti
At first, it was easy to think of Collier Schorr as the girl who photographed boys. It was never that simple, of course. Schorr is a gay woman who maintains that she's "always photographed girls— I've just used boys to do it." Gender was confused and subverted, often playfully.
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BACKSTORY
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TRANSCENDENCE: PHOTOGRAPHS BY SPACE-SHUTTLE ASTRONAUTS
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Michael Soluri
In the half century of human spaceflight since 1961, the visual experience of astronauts has been documented in still photography. However, during the last several decades of the space-shuttle era, astronaut-crew photography has become less responsive to the candid moments of working and living in space and has moved toward a kind of artless snapshot aesthetic.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0031.xml
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SELECTED BOOKS
EXCERPTS
David T. Hanson COLSTRIP, MONTANA
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The mining started long ago, and hasn't stopped. I drove on, heading for Colstrip through the blue dusk and into the night. Every now and again, I descended one of the hills into a little velvet basin of pines and grass where the lone light of a ranch burned, but mostly there was only darkness until I reached the town, which was much more beautiful than I had imagined it would be.
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SELECTED BOOKS
EXCERPTS
Molly Rogers DELIA'S TEARS: RACE, SCIENCE AND PHOTOGRAPHY IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICA
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When in 1976 fifteen daguerreotypes of black men and women were discovered in the attic of the Peabody Museum, the question of their meaning and purpose was immediately raised. The images were clearly unusual in that they were not like most daguerreotypes made in America: they did not depict white middle-class men and women posing for the camera.
Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0033.xml
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SELECTED BOOKS
EXCERPTS
Marco van Duyvendijk EASTWARD BOUND
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In June 2009 I visited the Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Tokyo. The museum was hosting an exhibition of nineteenthcentury photographs of Japan: some taken by Japanese photographers for a foreign audience and others taken by foreigners in Japan.
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REMEMBRANCE
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STEVAN A. BARON, 1938-2010
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Peggy Roalf
Steve Baron, Aperture's director of production for more than thirty years, always exerted the right mix of disdain and delight that seemed necessary to end up with a gorgeously printed book. So when he would ask an editor, as he so often did, "Can't you get better prints?"
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Aperture: Crumpler Bags
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Aperture
Crumpler Bags
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0036.xml
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REMEMBRANCE
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R. H. CRAVENS, 1940-2009
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Diana C. Stoll
Editor, writer, and literary consultant extraordinaire R. H. Cravens was an indispensable fixture at Aperture for more than three decades. He worked both in ufficio (starting in the 1970s) and ex, from the mid-1980s, when he moved from New York to Albuquerque.
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Advertisement
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GOTHAM IMAGING
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GOTHAM IMAGING
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Aperture_20110101_2011_202_0039.xml
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MIND'S EYE
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ON WILLIAM VANDER WEYDE'S PORTRAIT OF JOSIAH QUINCY, CA. 1910
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SUSAN HOWE
Scrolling through the digital archive of the George Eastman Collection of photographs by the American photographer William Vander Weyde in search of portraits of Henry James, I saw Pittsburgh at night, freight cars, locomotives, tattoo artists, a railroad disaster in Harrison, New York, with labeled corpses laid out in rows, street orators, praying foundlings, women wrestlers, William Vanderbilt's "Idle Hour" Estate, workers at the Ingersoll Watch Company, "solid air" experiments, the smallest horse in the world, Admiral Peary's ship Windward, yachts, bulldogs, cats, kittens, racehorses, baseball players, the maceration of money, the Philadelphia Mint in December 1898, close-ups of mail in Washington, D.C.'s dead-letter office, Voltaire's chair, bankers, captains, actors, an Uncle Sam impersonator, a performing monkey and his trainer, snails, freak patents, singular electric-light patents, the electric chair at Sing Sing, a condemned prisoner with his executioners, jujitsu lessons, hippos in the Central Park Zoo, reporters and soldiers outside the house in Buffalo where President McKinley was dying, Mrs. McKinley on crutches entering the house, Leon F. Czolgosz (the assassin), an ancient Edward Everett Hale in his cluttered study, an equally ancient Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry James in late middle-age, Maud Gonne at a desk writing letters, a bird-shaped air-ship, fire in an anonymous landscape, and "Subject: personage, legal/Quincy, Josiah": my paternal grandmother's—until now—invisible brother.
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LOOK3
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LOOK3
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RAYMOND WEIL
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RAYMOND WEIL
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