Issue: 20090101

Thursday, January 1, 2009
Spring 2009
194
True
2009
Friday, May 29, 2015
8/26/2015 7:45:28 PM

Articles
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CHARACTER PROJECT
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CHARACTER PROJECT
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Advertisements
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Nikon
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Nikon
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Aperture_20090101_2009_194_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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INDUSTRIAL COLOR: The IC LAB MasterPrint
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INDUSTRIAL COLOR
The IC LAB MasterPrint
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article
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NOTE
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NOTE
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The Editors
"What if everything has changed since 1898—and nothing has?" This is the tantalizing paradox about America's identity put forth by author Michael Lesy in his introduction to the little-known photography of William van der Weyde. Working at the turn of the last century, van der Weyde covered an eclectic cross section of American society for a number of prominent publications—photographing everything from the literary giants of the day to aspects of the military to eccentric entertainers.
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masthead
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Masthead
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Aperture_20090101_2009_194_0007.xml
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BLOOMSBURY
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BLOOMSBURY
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CONTRIBUTORS
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SIMON DOONAN is the creative director at Barney’s, New York. His most recent book is Eccentric Glamour (Simon & Schuster, 2008). ANTHONY DOWNEY is the Programme Director of the M.A. course in contemporary art at Sotheby’s Institute of Art, London, and an editorial board member of the journal Third Text.
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TO SUBSCRIBE
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Aperture (ISSN 0003-6420) is published quarterly, in spring, summer, fall, and winter, at 547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor, New York, New York, 10001. A one-year subscription (four issues) is $40 and a twoyear subscription (eight issues) is $66.
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YOSSI MILO GALLERY
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YOSSI MILO GALLERY
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article
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REVIEWS
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RICHARD AVEDON: PORTRAITS OF POWER
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Vicki Goldberg
Power and politics: mighty words for an election year. Paul Roth, curator of photography and media arts at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., had the canny idea of organizing Richard Avedon: Portraits of Power, the first show of Avedon’s portraits dealing specifically with those two words.
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article
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REVIEWS
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CLICK!: A CROWD-CURATED EXHIBITION
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Laurel Ptak
The computer screen is, for me, an ideal exhibition medium. I love the Internet's participatory culture and its flat, leveling digital aesthetic. Online one can feel gleefully removed from the trappings, conventions, and economic imperatives of the art world—and free to explore territories it never would.
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MR GALLERY
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MR GALLERY
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Aperture_20090101_2009_194_0014.xml
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REVIEWS
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PICTURE PARADISE: ASIA-PACIFIC PHOTOGRAPHY, 1840s-1940s
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Shelley Rice
Picture Paradise was a big exhibition. On view in the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra were more than four hundred photographs, books, and objects, ranging from daguerreotypes to Hollywood portraits, from a huge panorama of Sydney Harbour in 1875 by Charles Bayliss to small hand-colored Japanese albumen prints, from documentary records of New Zealand landscapes to Surrealist-influenced artistic statements by the Australian Max Dupain.
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article
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REVIEWS
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PARRWORLD
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Noemi Smolik
There is no bad weather in Parrworld. This is not the gray world of misfits; this is not the banality of the middle class. This is a cheerful, brightly colored world that Martin Parr has followed with his camera around the globe, and that was recently presented at Munich’s Haus der Kunst.
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aipad
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aipad
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article
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REVIEWS
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UGO MULAS: LA SCENA DELL'ARTE
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Augusto Pieroni
Ugo Mulas was one of the most interesting personalities in postwar Italian photography—a character that defies any singular definition as artist, professional, visual historian, or intellectual. He was simultaneously a documentarian, a photojournalist, and a fellow traveler of the international artistic community.
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article
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PORTFOLIO
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SALLY MANN UNTITLED
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ON LOCATION
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JIANG JIAN MEMORY AND HISTORY
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VICKI GOLDBERG
In 1984, when Jiang Jian began to take pictures of rural scenes in China's Henan Province, he was prompted by nostalgia for his own experience in the countryside. What's astonishing about this is that the only time he was on a farm was during the Cultural Revolution, from 1966 to '76.
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article
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ESSAY
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THRESHOLDS OF A COMING COMMUNITY: PHOTOGRAPHY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
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ANTHONY DOWNEY
The medium of photography has had an extended and probing relationship with issues surrounding human rights, migration, political violence, and the plight of refugees. As such, it is well suited to the exploration of a number of topics that are currently at the forefront of both political science and critical theory.
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WITNESS
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INTENDED CONSEQUENCES RWANDAN CHILDREN BORN OF RAPE
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JONATHAN TORGOVNIK
During the 1994 genocide, Rwandan women were subjected to sexual violence on a massive scale, perpetrated by members of the infamous Hutu militia groups known as the Interahamwe. Among the survivors, those who are most isolated are the women who have borne children as a result of being raped.
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50,51,52,53,54,55
WORK AND PROCESS
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PERTTI KEKARAINEN THE SENSATION OF SEEING
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LYLE REXER
Sight is fragile. Close your eyes and press them with your fingertips for an instant. When you open them, the world is spotted with patterns, tenuous, compromised, not quite real, no longer to be taken for granted. We think of sight as a window, as if there were little people inside our heads looking out, as Stephen Shore once remarked.
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MIXING THE MEDIA
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LOOK CLOSE THE SCRAPBOOKS OF DAN ELDON and CANDY JERNIGAN
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JESSICA HELFAND
People who keep journals—and in particular visual people who do so—are characterized by their utter devotion to recording evidence. From notebooks to scrapbooks to lined ledgers of lists, such efforts span everything from casually compiled records to capacious volumes of found matter.
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62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69
ARCHIVE
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WILLIAM VAN DER WEYDE AND THE AMERICAN MORALITY PLAY
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MICHAEL LESY
For fifteen years—from the beginning of the Spanish American War to the outbreak of World War I—William van der Weyde (1871-1929) went where he was sent and photographed what he was told. The media world he inhabited was made of paper: a press and printer’s ink world of books, magazines, and newspapers, ruled by editors who conducted themselves like mandarins.
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PHOTOGRAPHER'S PROJECT
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LISE SARFATI SHE
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SANDRA S. PHILLIPS
The people in Lise Sarfati's pictures never seem to be doing much of anything. They hang out, smoke cigarettes, sit on their beds, pour themselves coffee. They are usually alone, and most of them are women. They seem to be waiting. Will something happen to amuse or interest them?
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80,81,82
BOOKS
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RICHARD BENSON'S THE PRINTED PICTURE
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Darius Himes
In January 1839, the well-known story goes, two distinct photographic processes were announced. In France, Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre, an acclaimed Parisian theater designer and inventor of the diorama, announced an image-making process that he dubbed the daguerreotype.
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EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Janet Malcolm BURDOCK
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For three successive summers, on the top-floor landing of a house in the Berkshires, I have been photographing burdock leaves. I prop them in small glass bottles and photograph them head on, as if they were people facing me. No two leaves of any plant or tree are exactly alike, of course, but burdock leaves are of conspicuous and almost infinite variety.
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81,82
EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Zubin Shroff THE COSMOPOLITANS
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I do not intend this work to be an objective catalogue of “people of our time.” Nor is it a personal diary of those I happened to meet around the world. Instead, it expresses a wide range of possibilities and relationships between people, seeing commonality and difference, often simultaneously.
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EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Clément Chéroux, Ute Eskildsen THE STAMP OF FANTASY: THE VISUAL INVENTIVENESS OF PHOTOGRAPHIC POSTCARDS
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At the turn of the twentieth century, many small studios—especially the fairground ones—offered to photograph their clients in sets that recalled the scenes in fantasy cards: a joyous dance, adultery discovered, a pair of lovers in the moon, an intrepid man climbing the Eiffel Tower, and so on.
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article
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REMEMBRANCE
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ANNE D’HARNONCOURT, 1943-2008
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Lynne Honickman
When Anne d’Harnoncourt, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, died suddenly last June, the art world was stunned. So beloved was she as a civic monarch that Philadelphia’s mayor, Michael Nutter, proclaimed June 19 a day of citywide appreciation for her.
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REMEMBRANCE
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CORNELL CAPA, 1918-2008
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Fred Ritchin
In a small corner of a Quaker cemetery just north of New York City rests what might be called its Jewish contingent. There, on a scraggly hill just off the better-groomed main section of the cemetery, lie the graves of two brothers who, more than any siblings in photography’s history, transformed our sense of the medium’s possibilities.
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FESTIVALS
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BRIGHTON PHOTO BIENNIAL
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Jason Oddy
Ever since James Fenton first lugged his plate camera through the Crimean mud a century and a half ago, taking pictures of war has been a fraught affair. There is the obvious danger of being in combat zones, and the images of conflict themselves have at times generated almost as much heat as the hostilities they portray.
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The Press of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design
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The Press of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design
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Advertisement
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Aperture_20090101_2009_194_0035.xml
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87
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artbook
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artbook
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article
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MIND'S EYE
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ON MADAME YEVONDE’S LADY BALCON AS MINERVA, 1935
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SIMON DOONAN
I've always had a soft spot for anyone who dubs himor herself "madame" or "monsieur." Many examples spring to mind: there's Madame Blavatsky, the famous theosophist. And of course there's Monsieur Antoine, the not-so-famous hairdresser who coiffed many heads in Reading, my U.K. hometown, back in the 1950s.
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Advertisements
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FS distribution
VARYCON PAPERS
FS distribution
ADOX FILMS & PAPERS
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Aperture_20090101_2009_194_0038.xml
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KODAK: EKTAR 100
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KODAK
EKTAR 100
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