Issue: 20080202

Saturday, February 2, 2008
Summer 2008
191
True
2008
Friday, May 29, 2015
8/26/2015 7:36:43 PM

Articles
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Nikon: Nikon D3
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Nikon
Nikon D3
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CRUMPLER
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CRUMPLER
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FOLEYgallery
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FOLEYgallery
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NOTE
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NOTE
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Call it synchronicity, or zeitgeist, or part of a plan (subconscious or not): in this issue, several artists and writers pose parallel questions: What is the tangible outcome of photographs? What do they accomplish in this complicated world?
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masthead
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Masthead
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YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS
ANDREW BUSH Drive
YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS
THE ORIGINS OF AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CONTRIBUTORS
CONTRIBUTORS' BIOS
TO SUBSCRIBE
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VINCE ALETTI contributes critical writings to the New Yorker, Photograph, Photoworks, and other publications. In 2005, he received the International Center of Photography's Infinity Award for writing. GERRY BADGER is an architect, photographer, and writer.
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LAURENCE MILLER GALLERY
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LAURENCE MILLER GALLERY
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foam international photography magazine
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foam international photography magazine
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REVIEWS
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THE ART OF THE AMERICAN SNAPSHOT
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Andy Grundberg
Snapshots, those omnipresent, beguiling, confounding images of life's memorable and otherwise forgettable moments, would seem antithetical to whatever we mean when we refer to photography as an art. Once ripped from their family-album contexts they are on the whole anonymous, banal, repetitive, trite.
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REVIEWS
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IMPRESSED BY LIGHT BRITISH PHOTOGRAPHS FROM PAPER NEGATIVES, 1840-1860
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Laurie Dahlberg
Most lovers of photography know by now that the birth of the medium was attended by a rivalry of midwives—inventors of several nationalities, each asserting his claim to being the first to capture and fix the camera obscura's living image.
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REVIEWS
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RAY K. METZKER
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Martin Jaeggi
"Counterpoint," "Variations," "Improvisations," "Tonal Scales"— the titles of the subdivisions of the Ray K. Metzker retrospective at the Musée de I'Élysée in Lausanne, Switzerland, emphasize the photographer's affinity with music.
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PAULA COOPER GALLERY
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PAULA COOPER GALLERY
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article
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REVIEWS
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STEICHEN: LIVES IN PHOTOGRAPHY
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Gerry Badger
Edward Steichen can be considered the quintessential twentiethcentury photographer. This is an argument contained in the very title of the retrospective exhibition recently on view at the Jeu de Paume, Paris, curated jointly by Todd Brandow, William A. Ewing, and Nathalie Herschdorfer.
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REVIEWS
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HELEN LEVITT
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François Brunet
The Helen Levitt show at Paris’s Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson was one of several exhibitions of American photography in Paris last fall (also showing were Weegee, Clemens Kalischer, and Edward Steichen); and it was the second major display in the French capital of the doyenne of New York photography in just six years.
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REVIEWS
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DUTCH EYES: A CRITICAL HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE NETHERLANDS
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Bill Kouwenhoven
There must be something in the air. In the past year there have been at least four major retrospectives presenting a look at a nation's photography. Tate Britain in London mounted How We Are: Photographing Britain from the 1840s to the Present, the Jewish Museum in New York City presented Dateline Israel, documenting contemporary perspectives on Israeli photography; Helsinki’s Tennis Palace Art Museum showed Our Land!: Photographs from Finland; and last summer the Nederlands Fotomuseum (NFM) in Rotterdam put together the landmark survey Dutch Eyes: A Critical History of Photography in the Netherlands.
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Canon U.S.A., Inc.
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article
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MEDIA WATCH
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CLICK HERE TO DISAPPEAR SOME THOUGHTS ON IMAGES AND DEMOCRACY
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David Levi Strauss
Photography has always had the potential to democratize images, but it has seldom worked out that way in practice. Digital image-making devices are now ubiquitous in the private sector, and at the same time, in the public image-environment, images are primarily used to influence opinion and encourage the consumption of products and services.
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HONICKMAN FOUNDATION
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article
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ESSAY
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sophie calle: a lover's monologue
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GIUSEPPE MERLINO
The keywords under which one might file Roland Barthes's 1977 A Lover's Discourse: Fragments do not include "breakup"; other of love's sorrows are there, other vulnerabilities, but not the traumatic and lethal term breakup. Too melodramatic to be modern? Sophie Calle seems to be committed to making up for this absence.
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FILM
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THE FILMS OF ROBERT FRANK
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LUC SANTE
Robert Frank's films are much less widely known than his still photographs, for all sorts of reasons, a major one being that they are not easily available. Some have barely been seen since they were made, some have drifted across the cultural landscape as rumors more than objects or occurrences, some have circulated as barely decipherable bootlegs.
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WORK IN PROGRESS
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DISAPPEARANCES THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF TREVOR PAGLEN
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Thomas Keenan
The geographer and artist Trevor Paglen has made it his project of late to take pictures of things that are very hard to see, whether because they are very far away, or because they are hidden in secrecy or beyond the pale of recognition, or because they do not officially exist.
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PHOTOGRAPHER'S PROJECT
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HOW SILENT IMAGES CAN BREAK THE SILENCE
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JOHN BERGER
During the summer of 2006 I was in the gallery of the Reina Sofía, Madrid, standing in front of Picasso's Guernica. I saw, I believe, a reproduction of this black-and-white painting when it first came to London, one year after the Basque town had been destroyed on April 26, 1937.
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WORK AND PROCESS
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JANE HAMMOND'S RECOMBINANT DNA
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Amei Wallach
Jane Hammond came of artistic age as the 1970s morphed into the 1980s, a time when artists of every stripe were diagnosing the contagion of secondhand images that infects the ways we see ourselves. Many artists turned to photography, a medium complicit in the situation, for their critique.
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MIXING THE MEDIA
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TOWN & COUNTRY READING FOR THE LEISURE CLASS
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VINCE ALETTI
Town & Country, which published its first issue in 1846, today claims it is "America's longest continuously published lifestyle magazine." "Lifestyle" is not exactly a term the magazine's founders, Nathaniel P. Willis and George P. Morris, would have bandied about when they launched what they then called the Home Journal as “a necessary adjunct to every refined drawing-room in the land."
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BEFORE THE LENS
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OFF TO CAMP THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF James Bidgood
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PHILIP GEFTER
What is "gay art"? A rhetorical question, first of all, since art transcends genre, hovering in a perfection of its own. Still, the "love that dare not speak its name" evolved over the course of the twentieth century into a way of thinking and being now implicit in what has come to be regarded as "gay."
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ON LOCATION
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SUSAN DERGES: THE EDEN WINDOWS
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MARK HAWORTH-BOOTH
On August 10, 1872, a young Jesuit priest, on holiday on the Isle of Man, gazed at the Irish Sea. The priest was also a poet and he found astonishing words to describe what he saw, but even he— Gerard Manley Hopkins—had to admit bafflement at the complexity of the movement of waves.
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DIALOGUE
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HEAVY LIGHT: RECENT PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEO FROM JAPAN
A DISCUSSION WITH CHRISTOPHER PHILLIPS AND FUKU NORIKO
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This spring, New York's International Center of Photography presents Heavy Light: Recent Photography and Video from Japan, an exhibition that comprises photography, photo-based art, and video works by thirteen Japanese artists. Here, Aperture interviews the show's curators, Christopher Phillips and Fuku Noriko, about the impulse behind the exhibition, and about themes and currents in the photographic medium in Japan today.
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76,77,78,79,80,81
WITNESS
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Picturing the Iraq War Veterans
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Mary Panzer
Since early 2003, the media has been filled with images of and from the war in Iraq. On the front pages of news-papers, on television, on the Web, we see varying combinations of soldiers, civilians, and insurgents—fighting, falling, hiding, wounded, healing.
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BOOKS
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SEARCHING FOR SEBALD: PHOTOGRAPHY AFTER W. G. SEBALD
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Brian Dillon
“I believe,” said W. G. Sebald to an interviewer in 1997, “that the black-and-white photograph, or rather the gray zones in the black-and-white photograph, stand for this territory that is located between life and death.” It is almost too easy to talk about Sebald and photography, especially in these terms.
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EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Leah Bendavid-Val SONG WITHOUT WORDS: THE PHOTOGRAPHS AND DIARIES OF COUNTESS SOPHIA TOLSTOY
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[Sophia Tolstoy (Sonya)] enjoyed photography, taking pictures of people she liked being with, giving the trophies as gifts. And she worked very hard at her pictures. She made photographs and kept a diary because she felt impelled to document her introspections and to satisfy some undefined need in herself.
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EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Sara Blair HARLEM CROSSROADS: BLACK WRITERS AND THE PHOTOGRAPH IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
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[After] 1935 black and white and other image makers responded variously to local urgencies, competing aesthetics, and one another. Aaron Siskind, the practitioners of the New York Photo League, Roy DeCarava, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, William Klein, Don Charles, and many others thus came to make images in and about Harlem that tested or resisted foregone conclusions about race, progress, and modernity as they evaded unitary politics and critical accounting.
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EXCERPTS
SELECTED BOOKS
Carol Mavor READING BOYISHLY: ROLAND BARTHES, J. M. BARRIE, JACQUES HENRI LARTIGUE, MARCEL PROUST, AND D. W. WINNICOTT
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In 1908, Jacques [Henri Lartigue] took some of his best pictures of euphoric flight without gliders or kites, including one of Raymond Van Weers, nicknamed Oléo, caught in the air of a steeplechase. How like a sea swallow he looks, with his black-banded hat and coat tails like wings, he is a fairy-man, a fairy bird.
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REMEMBRANCE
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ALEXANDRA BOULAT, 1962-2007
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Maggie Steber
Michael Nichols
Photographer Alexandra Boulat died last October, at the age of forty-five, after suffering a brain aneurysm in June. Boulat had established herself as an Intrepid and very gifted photojournalist, and had devoted her remarkable energies also to the VII Photo Agency, which she co-founded in 2001.
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SALLY MANN
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SALLY MANN
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APERTURE
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APERTURE
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MIND'S EYE
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ALBERT MAYSLES ON CARTIER-BRESSON’S MATISSE
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Albert Maysles
This famous photograph by Henri Cartier-Bresson—of Matisse with white doves—is my favorite. Cartier-Bresson was an old friend whom I met through Bruce Davidson. When Bruce invited us both to his studio, he asked me to bring along a projector and a scene from one of my films.
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FS distribution
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SPIEWAK
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SPIEWAK
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