Issue: 19980101

Thursday, January 1, 1998
WINTER 1998
150
True
1998
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
8/26/2015 7:28:34 PM

Articles
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APERTURE
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masthead
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APERTURE
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tableOfContents
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APERTURE
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Aperture_19980101_1998_150_0003.xml
article
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Editor's Note
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MOMENTS OF GRACE: SPIRIT IN THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE
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THE EDITORS
While belief in a god as an undeniable reality or as an abstract concept is often in debate, many people believe in or sense an otherness—something beyond the influence of human beings, either outward or inward, surely intangible but reachable, at moments— to be an inherent factor in humankind's experience.
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article
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POSTNATURAL
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BILL McKIBBEN
The whole of nature is a metaphor of the human mind. —Ralph Waldo Emerson, from “Nature,” 1836 What on earth are we looking at when we look at nature? Something separate from us, something removed? Or something of which we’re a part? That is the original paradox for our species, a question that's been in the back of our collective mind since our earliest ancestors climbed down from the trees and began the process of confusing our relationship with everything else.
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article
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HOME
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MARY OLIVER
A certain lucent correspondence has served me, all my life, in the ongoing search for my deepest thoughts and feelings. It is the relationship of my own mind to landscape, to the physical world—especially to that part of it with which, over the years, I have (and not casually) become intimate.
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article
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THE EXPERIENCE OF PLACE
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TONY HISS
I am waiting for a rebirth of wonder and I am waiting for someone to really discover America and wail and I am waiting for the discovery of a new symbolic western frontier. . . . —Lawrence Ferlinghetti, from A Coney Island of the Mind We all react, consciously and unconsciously, to the places where we live and work, in ways we scarcely notice or that are only now becoming known to us. Ever-accelerating changes in most people's day-to-day circumstances are helping us and prodding us, sometimes forcing us, to learn that our ordinary surroundings, built and natural alike, have an immediate and a continuing effect on the way we feel and act, and on our health and intelligence.
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OUTSIDE (BUT NOT NECESSARILY BEYOND) THE LANDSCAPE
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LUCY R. LIPPARD
Human creativity is an integral part of the web formed by land, history, culture, and place, and nowhere is it more "exposed" than in photography, now endowed by computers with an unlimited capacity for visual mendacity. Photographs are about memory— or perhaps about the absence of memory, providing pictures to fill voids, illustrating and sometimes falsifying our collective memory.
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article
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PEOPLE AND IDEAS
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BLIND IN THE SUN
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Charles Bowden
These remarks were delivered on June 10, 1997, at the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona. The premise for the talk happened to be Lee Friedlander's show of black-and-white desert photographs entitled "An Excess of Facts, " but the exhibition functioned more as the platform for my notions on desert photography than the reason for them.
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PEOPLE AND IDEAS
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THE BUZZ ABOUT PAPARAZZI: MARCELLO MASTROIANNI REMEMBERS WORKING WITH FEDERICO FELLINI AND TAZIO SECCHIAROLI, THE FIRST PAPARAZZO
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Gloria Satta
Marcello Mastroianni did not collect photographs. "It would make me think of the past, and I don't want to. I'm like an old whore: when I'm finished with one trick, here I am, ready for the next." The actor, who died in December 1996, three years after this interview took place, did not even have a copy of Tazio Secchiaroli’s famous photo from the set of Federico Fellini’s 8½ Marcello, shirtless, a sheet wound about his flanks, a hat on his head and a whip in his hand.
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CHARLES BOWDEN is the author of fourteen books including Blood Orchid: An Unnatural History of America and Desierto: Memories of the Future. He is a contributing editor of Esquire, and also writes for other magazines such as Harper's and the New York Times Book Review, as well as for newspapers.
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ERRATA
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article
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CREDITS
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PHOTOGRAPHS: Unless otherwise noted, all photographs are courtesy of, and copyright by the artists. Front cover: copyright © The Percy W. Bullock and Edna J. Bullock Trust and courtesy Scott Nichols Gallery, San Francisco p. I copyright © 1997 by the Trustees of the Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust.
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advertisement
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DoubleTake
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DoubleTake
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Aperture_19980101_1998_150_0014.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement
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Aperture_19980101_1998_150_0015.xml
advertisement
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APERTURE
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APERTURE
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