Issue: 19940303

Thursday, March 3, 1994
SUMMER 1994
136
True
1994
Thursday, May 21, 2015
8/26/2015 7:00:51 PM

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1
[no value]
[no value]
APERTURE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0001.xml
masthead
0_2
0_2
[no value]
[no value]
APERTURE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0002.xml
tableOfContents
0_2
0_2,1
[no value]
[no value]
APERTURE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0003.xml
article
2
2,3
Editor's Note
[no value]
METAMORPHOSES
PHOTOGRAPHY IN THE ELECTRONIC AGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Morpheus, the god of dreams in Ovid's epic account of Greek mythology, seems an appropriate guiding spirit for this issue of Aperture, likewise entitled "Metamorphoses." For it is out of a kind of dream that we awaken today into a world of digital, or electronic, imaging; "virtual reality" (a distinctly late-twentieth-century oxymoron); Photo CD; and a variety of related technological developments in communications and the arts.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0004.xml
article
4
4,5,6,7
[no value]
[no value]
FROM DADA TO DIGITAL
MONTAGE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
[no value]
[no value]
TIMOTHY DRUCKREY
Photography emerged in a century during which history and temporality collided in the realm of representation. The transformation of experience through the nineteenth century was increasingly one of time and contingency; the maturation of modernity fragmented long-comforting narratives of nature and culture.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0005.xml
article
8
8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31
PORTFOLIOS I
[no value]
COMPUTER PHOTOMONTAGE
EVA SUTTON
MARTINA LOPEZ
ANIL MELNICK
SHELLY J. SMITH
ROSHINI KEMPADOO
OSAMU JAMES NAKAGAWA
ESTHER PARADA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY APPROPRIATING IMAGERY FROM PHOTOGRAPHS (PRIMARILY OLD PRINTS FOUND IN JUNK SHOPS, FLEA MARKETS, AND garbage bins) and combining these images in the computer, I create a kind of visual photomontage. The computer's ability to overlay images, combined with the historical verisimilitude of the photographs, gives the resulting works the aura of relics.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0006.xml
article
32
32,33,34,35,36,37
[no value]
[no value]
PEDRO MEYER'S DOCUMENTARY FICTIONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JONATHAN GREEN
"Photographic reality" is an expression that has defined our notion of visual truth for the past 150 years. Pedro Meyer's new digital photographs call into question this long-lived concept. His wry images challenge the essential truths and myths surrounding the documentary aesthetic.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0007.xml
article
38
38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45
[no value]
[no value]
WILD IRISES
A Nash Editions Portfolio
[no value]
[no value]
VINCENT KATZ
Graham Nash is a man of many interests. He is probably best known as the soft, dreamy voice in the rock group Crosby, Stills and Nash. His previous band, the Hollies, rattled off a string of hits in the 1960s with a decidedly English feel, different from CSN's down-home, radical American hippie sound.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0008.xml
article
46
46,47,48,49,50,51
[no value]
[no value]
PHANTASM
DIGITAL IMAGING AND THE DEATH OF PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
[no value]
GEOFFREY BATCHEN
In 1839, faced with the invention of photography, Paul Delaroche is supposed to have declared, "From today, painting is dead!" A little over 150 years later everyone seems to be talking about the death of photography. This outburst of morbidity appears to stem from two related anxieties.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0009.xml
article
52
52,53,54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67
PORTFOLIOS II
[no value]
THE VIRTUAL LANDSCAPE
KATHLEEN RUIZ
PETER CAMPUS
BARBARA KASTEN
PAUL THOREL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT IS THE UNSEEN, INTERIOR STRUCTURES OF NATURE AND THOUGHT THAT INTEREST ME: THE BORDER BETWEEN PHYSICAL, OBJECTIVE SPACE AND INCORPOREAL, SUBJECTIVE SPACE. My work is concerned with issues of restructured reality as evidenced in encrypted messages of presence, absence, and transformation.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0010.xml
article
68
68,69,70
PEOPLE AND IDEAS
[no value]
THE DIGITAL MUSEUM
Objects within Objects
Seeing the Unforeseen
The Digital Object
[no value]
[no value]
Ben Davis
Museums are repositories for evidence: evidence that events have occurred, phenomena have been noted, human expression persists. Museums remind us that we are not and have not been alone. But many cultures exist without museums. In cultures such as the Balinese, evidence is stored in the collective memory and preserved by being spoken.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0011.xml
article
70
70,71,72
PEOPLE AND IDEAS
[no value]
VIRTUAL REALITY CHECK: AN E-MAIL INTERVIEW WITH BRENDA LAUREL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Michael Sand
The following interview with Brenda Laurel took place via electronic mail over the course of four weeks at the beginning of 1994. The coding before the first question and response is standard transmittal information for messages sent over the Internet, the world's largest information network.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0012.xml
article
73
73,74,75
[no value]
[no value]
A DEFINING REALITY: THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF NANCY BURSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rebecca Busselle
Elevator doors part onto main exhibition space of the Jayne H. Baum gallery. The scene resembles a children's birthday party more than a sedate SoHo opening, despite a sizable representation of black-clad adults. Kids tear around trailing silver balloons on strings.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0013.xml
article
76
76,77
LETTERS
[no value]
LETTERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Adams
Aperture # 133, "On Location," elicited unusually strong response—| most enthusiastic, some critical—from subscribers and members of the photographic community. Although we do not ordinarily run a Letters to the Editor column, we felt that one letter in particular, from the photographer Robert Adams, demanded publication.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0014.xml
article
77
77,78
CONTRIBUTORS
[no value]
CONTRIBUTORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEOFFREY BATCHEN, an Australian cultural critic, currently teaches in the Visual Arts Department at the University of California, San Diego. NANCY BURSON's photographs have been seen in numerous publications, including the New York Times, Omni, and American Photographer.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0015.xml
article
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
CREDITS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Unless otherwise indicated, all photographs were digitally created, altered, or enhanced, and are copyright by, and courtesy of, the artists. Sizes refer to exhibition format with height listed first. Front cover: computer photomontage by Shelly J. Smith, output as a 30 x 40" Iris ink-jet print on cotton rag paper or cotton canvas;
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0016.xml
article
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
There are many people who helped make "Metamorphoses: Photography in the Electronic Age" possible. Charles Traub, at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, was especially helpful at the outset of this project, and put us in touch with a number of talented younger artists working in digital media.
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0017.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION PRESS: Eakins and the Photograph
[no value]
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION PRESS
Eakins and the Photograph
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0018.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0019.xml
advertisement
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0020.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0021.xml
article
82
82
Back Cover
[no value]
Back Cover
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19940303_1994_136_0022.xml