Issue: 19930303

Wednesday, March 3, 1993
SUMMER 1993
132
True
1993
Wednesday, July 15, 2015
8/26/2015 8:07:20 PM

Articles
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APERTURE
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masthead
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Masthead
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APERTURE
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Editor's Note
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IMMAGINI ITALIANE
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Con amicizia
The term "Immagini Italiane" may evoke the various travels delineated by Goethe, D. H. Lawrence, Mark Twain, and others; or, one might envision Paul Strand’s people of Luzzara; the Venice of Palladio and Canaletto, or Alfred Stieglitz’s Venetian boy.
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4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11
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DEL BENE E DEL MALE
OR, WHO’S ON TOP?
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LINA WERTMULLER
The media is full of sex. There is an outpouring from all directions— famous pundits, important journalists, sociologists—all the jungle drums of our global village. A recent echo came in the form of the hype surrounding the film Basic Instinct.
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DRAWING FROM THE IMAGINATION
THE COMIC ART OF DARIO FO
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RON JENKINS
"The clown has taken the place of the Pope,” laughs Dario Fo as he surveys the exhibition of his artwork in a deconsecrated fifteenth-century church. He strolls gleefully around a Harlequin that sits on a throne in the center of the church beneath an effigy of the Pope that hangs suspended from the ceiling in an undignified pose.
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14,15,16,17,18,19
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THE GOSPELS ACCORDING TO FO
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DARIO FO
The following narrative is excerpted from a monologue written and performed by Dario Fo, Johan Padan and the Discovery of the Americas. Fo improvised and refined the text as he played it nightly from the fall of 1991 to the spring of 1993. He acts all the parts himself, suggesting character changes with slight shifts of tone and creating scenic effects with gestural montage and onomatopoeic sounds.
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20,21,22,23,24,25
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FLASH WARNING
THE PAPARAZZI ARE COMING
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MASSIMO DI FORTI
First came the flash. And the flash was a weapon. It served to capture the fleeting moment, breaking with the tradition of the posed image, and helping to usher in the era of aggressive photojournalism. The paparazzi went around—cameras ready, flash always on—like a bunch of policemen with guns drawn, in pursuit of their prey, waiting for something interesting to happen, for the right person to pass by.
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26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48
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POETICA E POESIA
A READING OF RECENT ITALIAN PHOTOGRAPHY
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ROBERTA VALTORTA
One characteristic in the development of Italian photography is the absence of continuity; it has undergone a constant rebirth of styles or earlier achievements that have been forgotten. This is due largely to the fragmentary nature of Italian culture, the elusive goal of political unification, and the country’s lack of a systematic approach to teaching and exhibiting photography.
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A MINIMAL ADVENTURE
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PAOLO COSTANTINI
“I don’t know if the cultural situation in Italy today is more like a great void or a small chaos,” Luigi Malerba wrote some time ago. In this uncertain universe, it seems that we have only a mass of fragmentary observations, animate pages, sequences, projects, and photographs, to show us the many faces of our reality.
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BLOOD TIES: THE MAFIA
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VINCENZO CONSOLO
Even the etymology of the name is shrouded in mystery: Mafia. Where does it come from? What does it mean? In Sicilian and Italian dictionaries the word is sometimes described as deriving from the French, sometimes from the Spanish, sometimes from the Arabic (from mahefil, meaning assembly or place of assembly)—etymologies that betray the various foreign dominations of Sicily.
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AGAINST THE ODDS
ONE WOMAN’S BATTLE WITH THE MOB: AN INTERVIEW WITH LETIZIA BATTAGLIA
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GIOVANNA CALVENZI
For many people in Sicily and elsewhere, Letizia Battaglia is both a point of reference and a solid certainty as a photographer and as a person. If a coherent description of her can’t be unraveled from the various stories one hears, it can be said that she has become a symbol—of the struggle against the Mafia, of course, and of the intelligent and refined use of photography as an instrument in this struggle.
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58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69
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THE INVENTION OF SOUTHERNNESS
PHOTOGRAPHIC TRAVELS AND THE DISCOVERY OF THE OTHER HALF OF ITALY
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ANTONELLA RUSSO
Throughout the history of Italy, the South—an umbrella term covering Abruzzo, Campania, Basilicata (formerly Lucania), Puglia, Calabria, and Sicily, has been considered a too-distant and altogether foreign country. The notion of the South filled in for a diversity of categories, most of which helped depict an otherwise unknown and unrepresentable region; this bassa Italia (“low” Italy), this “Italian India” (as it was referred to by sixteenth-century Jesuits, who thought they could train themselves for life in the wilderness of the West Indies in Italy’s South), came to be perceived as a reservoir of archaic cultures and costumes, and of inaccessible languages.
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PEOPLE AND IDEAS
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A SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP: Collecting and the History of Italian Photography
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Carlo Bertelli
In 1961 a short survey of the history of Italian photography, compiled by Lamberto Vitali, appeared as an appendix to the Italian translation of Peter Pollack’s History of Photography from Antiquity to Today. An appendix was necessary, as Pollack’s book scarcely gave mention of what had happened in Italian photography since the first daguerreotypes were made, as early as 1839.
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PEOPLE AND IDEAS
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IN THE MEANTIME: Fashion Photographer Fabrizio Ferri Turns His Focus to Pediatric AIDS
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ACQVA, photographs by Fabrizio Ferri. Published by Industria, 1992. ($50.00 — available in New York and Milan at Industria Superstudio, and elsewhere at stores carrying the Industria clothing collection. One hundred percent of all proceeds will be donated to the Pediatric AIDS Foundation).
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PEOPLE AND IDEAS
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ADVERTISING, NAKED AND FULLY CLOTHED
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Furio Colombo
There are far more important issues in the world today than advertising images. But there is a fascinating relevance in photographer Oliviero Toscani’s and Benetton’s use of violent, sexual, wrenchingly provocative, drastic images.
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PEOPLE AND IDEAS
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A FORCED PERSPECTIVE: Aerial Photography and Fascist Propaganda
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Karen Frome
Mass movements are usually discerned more clearly by the camera than by the naked eye. A bird’s-eye view best captures gatherings of hundreds of thousands. This means that mass movements, including war, constitute a form of human behavior which particularly favors mechanical equipment.
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CARLO BERTELLI was formerly director of the Brera Art Gallery in Milan. At present he is professor of Medieval and Renaissance Art at the University of Lausanne. He has taught widely in Europe and America, and has published extensively on medieval and Renaissance art.
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CREDITS
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Unless otherwise noted, all photographs are courtesy of, and copyright by, the artists. Cover photograph by Mario Giacomelli, from the series “Io non ho mani che mi accarezzino il viso,” 1962-63; p. 9 toned print by Giuliana Traverso, 6 × ⅛";
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Leica Camera Inc.: Leica R7
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Leica Camera Inc.
Leica R7
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Back Cover
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Back Cover
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