Issue: 19910404

Thursday, April 4, 1991
FALL 1991
125
True
1991
Tuesday, January 27, 2015
8/26/2015 7:53:09 PM

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1
[no value]
[no value]
APERTURE
The Encompassing Eye: Photography As Drawing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0001.xml
masthead
0_2
0_2
Masthead
[no value]
Masthead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0002.xml
article
1
1
Editor's Note
[no value]
The Encompassing Eye: Photography as Drawing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE EDITORS
As the central role photography has played in contemporary art and culture is increasingly recognized, it becomes important to examine its links to other visual media. Considering the parallels between this machine-aided medium and drawing, the prototypical art of the hand, may throw light on the nature and uses of both.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0003.xml
tableOfContents
1
1
[no value]
[no value]
APERTURE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0004.xml
article
2
2,3,4,5,6,7,8
[no value]
[no value]
Decoding the Cipher of Reality: Fox Talbot in His Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert Harbison
Of all strange births, William Henry Fox Talbot's invention of photography was one of the strangest. The crucial event, at least according to his own account, happened on his honeymoon in Switzerland: he was making a sketch by a lakeside with the help of a camera lucida, and grew frustrated at the results.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0005.xml
article
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
Talbot Today: Changing Views of a Complex Figure
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Michael Gray
William Henry Fox Talbot is now recognized as the single most important figure in the formative years of photography, and the events of his life between 1833 and 3840 have been recounted in numerous publications over the years. However, as new research is brought forward, a more human and sympathetic picture of Talbot's character begins to emerge.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0006.xml
article
10
10,11,12,13,14,15
[no value]
[no value]
Daguerre, Talbot, and the Crucible of Drawing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Weston Naef
Still astonishing in its coincidences, the story is well known: in January of 1839, the world heard two nearly simultaneous public announcements that sunlight had been harnessed to make pictures, one from Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre in Paris, the other from William Henry Fox Talbot in London.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0007.xml
article
16
16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23
[no value]
[no value]
Tracing the Line: Art and Photography in the Age of Contact
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Merry Foresta
For sheer inventiveness, few artists of any era have matched Man Ray and László MoholyNagy. Between the two World Wars these artists, who counted among their multiple talents painting, sculpture, filmmaking, and photography, defined a photographic medium capable of taking on the difficult task of making art in the twentieth century.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0008.xml
article
24
24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31
[no value]
[no value]
Conservation of Matter: Robert Rauschenberg's Art of Acceptance
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald J. Saff
I use photography—use everything that I can find—but photography is a way for me to stay in touch with all the shadows and highlights that are around me. It's an exercise that keeps my feet on the ground but moving, the realization that every corner of the room is never going to be the same again.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0009.xml
article
32
32,33,34,35
[no value]
[no value]
Into a World of Color: An Interview With David Hockney
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Graham Nash
Graham Nash: I think we come from similar places in England, similar backgrounds. I'm from Manchester. And you're from Bradford? David Hockney: Yes, I was born there in 1937. GN: My main impression of the north of England was that it was very gray, monotone.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0010.xml
article
36
36,37,38,39,40,41
[no value]
[no value]
Collapsing Hierarchies: Photography and Contemporary Art
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Carter Ratcliff
Two centuries ago few could afford to travel for amusement and the camera had not been invented. Yet the desire for pictures of foreign places was as strong then as it is now, and those able to take the Grand Tour could hire a draftsman to record sights seen along the way.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0011.xml
article
42
42,43,44,45,46,47
[no value]
[no value]
The Shape of Seeing: Ellsworth Kelly’s Photographs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
I began taking photographs in 1950, in France. Earlier that year in Paris, I had started to make collages of fragments developed from shadows and architectural motifs. Of course I was also painting then. While visiting some friends in the country, I borrowed a Leica; it was the first time I used a camera to make notations of things I had seen and subjects I had been drawing.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0012.xml
article
48
48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55
[no value]
[no value]
Landscapes of Form
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Toshio Shibata
At the age of sixteen I began studying to be a painter. In the 1970s I experimented with a variety of media, including prints and photography, but since around 1980 I have concentrated mainly on photography. In it I found a direct power of expression that compelled me to discard all of the other techniques I had learned.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0013.xml
article
56
56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71
[no value]
[no value]
The Encompassing Eye: Photography as Drawing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles Hagen
"The Encompassing Eye: Photography as Drawing" begins from a historical fact: that photography at its inception was seen by many observers as a particular, almost magical kind of drawing.1 This is expressed most famously in William Henry Fox Talbot's description of the events that led him to discover his photographic process, when he grew dissatisfied with his inept attempts to draw scenes around Lake Como, during a visit there in 1833.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0014.xml
article
72
72,73,74
People and Ideas
[no value]
LEE FRIEDLANDER, DISPASSIONATE VOYEUR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Vicki Goldberg
Lee Friedlander’s career, like most photographers', has evolved more by changes in subject than shifts in style. His vision was established early; he has merely elucidated it and elaborated on it over time. It is a vision that has absorbed the lessons of Cubism, with its overlaps, transparencies, and fragmentations, its simultaneous views of what is in front and what is behind, its use of letters and patterns to insist on the two-dimensional surface.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0015.xml
article
74
74,75,76
People and Ideas
[no value]
DAVID SALLE: PHOTOGRAPHIC SYMPTOMS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald Kuspit
The psychological meanings suggested by the photographs are so overt that one might almost compose a case report on them—and their maker: Subject's name: Salle, David. Profession: artist. Symptom: obsession with woman, as evidenced in paintings and photographs.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0016.xml
article
76
76
acknowledgments
[no value]
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A great many people have helped make "The Encompassing Eye: Photography as Drawing" possible. Thanks are due first and foremost to the photographers and writers involved in the project, for their beautiful and thought-provoking contributions.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0017.xml
article
77
77
CONTRIBUTORS
[no value]
CONTRIBUTORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MERRY FORESTA is Curator at the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. She curated the 1988 retrospective, "Perpetual Motif: The Art of Man Ray" and recently co-curated “Man Ray in Fashion." She is preparing an exhibition of contemporary American landscape photography, entitled "Between Home and Heaven," to be presented in 1992.
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0018.xml
article
77
77
Credits
[no value]
CREDITS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOTE: Dimensions in the following credits are given with the height listed first. Unless otherwise noted, all pictures are courtesy of and copyright by the artists. Cover photograph by Ray K. Metzker, 20 x 16" gelatin silver print; p. 2 reproduction from The Pencil of Nature, courtesy of Hans P. Kraus, Jr.;
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0019.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0020.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
Institute of Design Illinois Institute of Technology
[no value]
Institute of Design Illinois Institute of Technology
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0021.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
GRANTA
[no value]
GRANTA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0022.xml
advertisement
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
APERTURE: Toward A Truer Life
[no value]
APERTURE
Toward A Truer Life
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0023.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0024.xml
article
82
82
Back Cover
[no value]
Back Cover
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19910404_1991_125_0025.xml