Issue: 19900303

Saturday, March 3, 1990
EARLY SUMMER 1990
119
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1990
Wednesday, July 15, 2015
8/26/2015 7:52:27 PM

Articles
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APERTURE
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masthead
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Masthead
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Editor's Note
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Cultures in Transition: The World’s Reality
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THE EDITORS
Increasingly a sense of interdependence has come to characterize relations between cultures—a sense of shared problems and concerns; of multivalent exchanges, whether political, economic, or artistic. This new sense of connectedness can be found not only among industrialized nations, as political barriers in force since World War II fall, but also in relations between industrialized and developing nations.
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tableOfContents
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APERTURE
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Aperture_19900303_1990_119_0004.xml
article
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2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11
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The Unveiled: Algerian Women, 1960
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Carole Naggar
Virtually forgotten today, the Algerian War (1954-1962) was for France somewhat like what the Vietnam War was for the United States: a painful era, woven with errors and official denial, unconsciously repressed so that even today, French people find it difficult to confront directly.
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article
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12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19
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A House Divided: South Africa's Hostels
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David Lewis
Hostel life is the quintessential apartheid experience for millions of black South Africans. It is the mortar and brick representation of the recently scrapped pass laws. Men—and, less frequently, women—denied the right to settle permanently in the towns where they were forced to seek work, and denied the right to be accompanied by their families, spent eleven months of each year in one or another hostel complex, often returning for decades on end to the same dormitory, even the same bed.
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20,21,22,23,24,25
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Retrato de un Pueblo
LUZ MARINA BAUTISTA
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Wendy Ewald
In 1981 I received a Fulbright fellowship to work in Colombia. I settled in Ráquira, a small village on the western spine of the Andes. Set in the wide-open, gentle mountains, everything in the village looks diminutive: from the adobe huts made by children from the mud after a rain, to the horses, cows, pigs, and cane fields—all like toys in a farm set.
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article
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26,27,28,29,30,31
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Other Viewpoints, Other Dimensions
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Susan Morgan
A traveler's curiosity courts a variety of uncertainties: unanticipated pleasures, tragic realizations, happy accidents. Elaine Reichek's work takes possession of that curiosity, orchestrating cultural questions through images.
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32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41
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Sobriety and Variation: Notes on Brazilian/Yoruba Sacred Altars
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Robert Farris Thompson
We move in the study of Afro-Brazilian art—whether originating from the Yoruba of western Nigeria or the Bokongo of Bas-Zaire—from naive appreciation to strategy and spiritual discernment. At the turn of the century, to study the candomblés of Brazil was to study "the marginal."
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article
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42,43
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APERTURE SYMPOSIUM at Esalen Institute
The World's Reality
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In a world both increasingly fragmented and incrementally interdependent, the boundaries of existence are being remade daily. New technologies redefine our relation to the environment, upheavals in social structure and the breakdown of systems of identity threaten cultural norms; new political realities impose long-range conditions for change.
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article
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44,45,46,47,48,49
ESALEN
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The Past Becoming Future
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Nan Richardson
If he is honest, [the ethnographer] is faced with a problem—the value he attaches to foreign societies—and which appears to be higher in proportion as the society is more foreign—has no foundation. It is a function of his disdain for, and occasionally hostility toward, the customs prevailing in his native setting.
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50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57
ESALEN
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Reclaiming a Cultural Legacy: The Ju/'hoansi of Namibia
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Megan Biesele
There are two kinds of bioscope [movies]. One kind shows us as people like other people, who have things to do and plans to make. This kind helps us. The other kind shows us as if we were animals, and plays right into the hands of people who want to take our land.
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article
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58,59,60,61
ESALEN
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Native Visions: The Growth of Indigenous Media
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Elizabeth Weatherford
When they were first exposed to film and photography, many tribal peoples could not see the purpose of these media. Introduced by outsiders, the camera seemed one more item, in a long history of contact with Euro-Americans, intended to take from indigenous communities but not give in return.
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article
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62,63,64,65
ESALEN
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Making a New Culture: An Interview with Omar Badsha
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Charles Hagen
In 1988 Omar Badsha was invited to attend Aperture's conference on "The World's Reality" at Esalen, but the South African government denied him a visa to leave the country—as it had for the previous twenty-five years. A photographer, teacher, and editor, Badsha is director of the Documentary Photography Project at the University of Cape Town, and has long championed the use of documentary photography as a tool in the struggle against apartheid.
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66,67,68,69,70,71
ESALEN
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Of Wood and Stone
Video stills from Edin Velez's Meaning of the Interval
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Karoline Postal-Vinay
The Shinto shrines at Ise are the most venerable ones in Japan: the Geku shrine dates back to the fifth century, while the Naiku is even 600 years older. Physically speaking, though, both of them are teenagers: every twenty years, as the generations change, they are entirely reconstructed, rebuilt using the same kind of wood and according to the same techniques, passed on from generation to generation.
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72,73
People and Ideas
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Videomakers and Basketmakers
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Leslie Marmon Silko
Petroglyphs on rock-outcrops along the San Jose River suggest that the Paleo-Indian ancestors of the Pueblos had already begun to make images of spiritual significance on the sandstone eighteen thousand years ago. Pueblo Kivas have stylized abstract designs painted on the walls and Kiva altarpieces.
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73,74,75
People and Ideas
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The Psychoids of Oppression and a Faith in Healing: The Life and Work of W. Eugene Smith
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A. D. Coleman
Some might think that 1989 was the year Gene Smith came back to haunt us. I prefer to think he never left. Like Banquo's ghost, he has unfinished business to resolve. For among the many things Smith embodied was the uneasy conscience of photojournalism and of photography itself, which neither can nor should ever be laid to rest.
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75,76
People and Ideas
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The South, Inside and Out
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Alice Rose George
A World Unsuspected: Portraits of Southern Childhood, edited and with an introduction by Alex Harris. Published by the Center for Documentary Photography, Duke University, and the University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill and London, 1988 ($16.95 hardcover).
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CONTRIBUTORS
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CONTRIBUTORS
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OMAR BADSHA, a photographer, teacher, and writer, is the director of the Documentary Photography Project at the University of Cape Town, and a founding member of the photographers' collective Afrapix. MEGAN BIESELE is the project director of the JU/WA Bushman Development Foundation, P.O. Box 9026, Windhoek, Namibia, and an adjunct professor of Anthropology at Rice University, Houston, Texas.
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
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For their welcome advice and timely assistance, we would like to thank many people who helped with this issue, and in particular Alex Harris, Jay Ruby, Susan Jonas, Darrill Bazzy, Margaret Sartor, Sue Cabazas, and Jaine Roberts. The World’s Reality Conference was hosted through the generosity of the Esalen Institute. Founded in 1962 by Michael Murphy, who remains a guiding force of the Institute, Esalen continues its tradition of broadening life dimensions for a significant number of people every year through its superb facilities on the Big Sur Coast.
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CREDITS
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Cover photocollage by Elaine Reichek, 60" × 45 1/2", courtesy of the Arthur and Carol Goldberg Collection; pp. 3&endash;II photographs by Marc Garanger; pp. 12&endash;19 photographs by Roger Meintjies, courtesy of Afrapix; p. 21 photograph by Javier Reyes, courtesy of Wendy Ewald;
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78
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Rollei: Hasselblad
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Rollei
Hasselblad
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79
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The Kardan Master GTL
Linhof
Kardan GT
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Mother Jones Fine Print Program
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Mother Jones Fine Print Program
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Aperture_19900303_1990_119_0024.xml
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LAURENCE MILLER CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHS
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LAURENCE MILLER CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHS
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Aperture_19900303_1990_119_0025.xml
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article
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Back Cover
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Back Cover
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