Issue: 19720101

Saturday, January 1, 1972
1972
3
True
16
Monday, June 1, 2015
8/26/2015 7:21:12 PM

Articles
cover
1
1
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0001.xml
tableOfContents
2
2
Table of Contents
[no value]
Aperture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0002.xml
masthead
2
2
[no value]
[no value]
Masthead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0003.xml
article
3
3
[no value]
[no value]
From "Modern Painters," Vol. V
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
And I desire, especially, that the reader should note this, in now closing the work through which we have passed together in the investigation of the beauty of the visible world. For perhaps he expected more pleasure and freedom in that work; he thought that it would lead him at once into fields of fond imagination, and may have been surprised to find that the following of beauty brought him always under a sterner dominion of mysterious law; that brightness was continually based upon obedience, and all majesty only another form of submission.
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0004.xml
article
4
4,5,6,7,8,9
[no value]
[no value]
Saṁvega: Aesthetic Shock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANANDA K. COOMARASWAMY
The Pali word saṁvega is often used to denote the shock or wonder that may be felt when the perception of a work of art becomes a serious experience. In other contexts the root vij, with or without the intensive prefix sam, or other prefixes such as pra, "forth," implies a swift recoil from or trembling at something feared.
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0005.xml
article
10
10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17
[no value]
[no value]
Scientific Description of Art
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERIC SCHROEDER
Ruskin, a morally saturated man, has not been fashionably admired in a morally diluted age, which is perhaps now already passing away. With Ruskin, writing about architecture was an art, for he wrote beautifully; but whether his approach or the stern archeology of later fashion has the better right to be called scientific is what I would ask.
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0006.xml
article
18
18,19,20,21,22,23
[no value]
[no value]
Double Portrait, Alfred Stieglitz & Ananda Coomaraswamy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROGER LIPSEY
Alfred Stieglitz met Ananda Coomaraswamy in 1923 although they must have known each other vaguely for several years. Coomaraswamy was not yet the austere art historian and philosopher—the living reminder of the meaning behind the image—that he would become in the 1930's and 1940's.
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0007.xml
article
24
24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39
[no value]
[no value]
A Composer's Vision: photographs by Ernest Bloch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERIC JOHNSON
In 1922 Alfred Stieglitz made a group of photographs entitled, "Music— A Sequence of Ten Cloud Photographs." The following year, he related what he had wanted in his series: ...I told Miss [Georgia] O'Keeffe I wanted a series of photographs which when seen by Ernest Bloch (the great composer) he would exclaim: Music! Music! Man, why that is music! How did you ever do that? And he would point to violins, and flutes, and oboes, and brass, full of enthusiasm, and would say he'd have to write a symphony called "Clouds."
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0008.xml
article
40
40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66
[no value]
[no value]
Walt Whitman & Thomas Eakins; A Poet’s and A Painter’s Camera-Eye
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LINCOLN KIRSTEIN
From its inception, photography offered itself as a universal facility, a ready-made skill, even an instant art, with which science had endowed the commonality through the triumph of industrial revolution. Any ordinary man could not paint a picture which would be a recognizable replica of fractional nature.
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0010.xml
article
67
67,68
Contributors
[no value]
Contributors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ananda K. Coomaraswamy (1877&endash;1947) was for thirty years Curator and later Research Fellow at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. His fields of interest extended from Indian art and metaphysics outward towards a general concept of traditional culture as distinct from modern.
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0011.xml
article
69
69
[no value]
[no value]
Photograph by Paul Caponigro
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0012.xml
article
70
70
[no value]
[no value]
Photograph by Arthur Lazar
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0013.xml
article
71
71
[no value]
[no value]
Photograph by Doug Prince
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0014.xml
article
72
72
[no value]
[no value]
Photograph by Geri Della Rocca DeCandal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0015.xml
advertisement
73
73
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0016.xml
article
74
74
Back Cover
[no value]
Back Cover
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Aperture_19720101_1972_063_0017.xml