Issue: 19570101

Tuesday, January 1, 1957
1957
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Wednesday, May 27, 2015
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Articles
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aperture
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Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0001.xml
tableOfContents
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
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Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0002.xml
masthead
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Masthead
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Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0003.xml
article
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EDITORIAL
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the ambiguous expressive/creative photograph
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Unlike explicitly informational pictures, such as the photo journalist favors (and which can be read directly), the expressive/creative photographs have to be read cautiously. There is more going on in a Sommer photograph, for instance, than information, and the direct reading will reveal only a part.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0004.xml
article
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COVER PICTURE
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Walter Snyder
. . . leads to a feeling that I must express about photography as I experience it. The feeling is: one who tries to produce a thing which at once and without doubt expresses complete cognizance of the fantastic and overwhelming facts of creativity as embodied in one's own entity.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0005.xml
article
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5,6
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THE SUBCONSCIOUS OF THE CAMERA
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Roman Freitag
It is quite possible that the mere sight of this heading will produce violent reactions, probably in the form of explosive language. What ever next! Our dear camera, beloved by us just because it seemed to be the least susceptible to inhibitions and complexes!
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0006.xml
article
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7,8,9,10
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PEELED PAINT, CAMERAS AND HAPPENSTANCE
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Minor White
When asked why photographers turn their cameras on the weathered and worn, any photographer who habitually finds the eroded and the ruined fascinating is probably at a loss for an answer. Ten to one he will fumble for words and finally settle for "Because I like it."
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0007.xml
article
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11,12,13
NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
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MORE BOOKS FOR THE CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHER
ZEN IN THE ART OF ARCHERY
NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION
THE DEHUMANIZATION OF ART
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ROBERT FORTH
WALTER SNYDER
". . . the thought came to me of writing to you about a subject I haven’t had the opportunity of talking to anyone about (because nobody would understand) and that is, the cultivation of the self, using photography as a means—and, as a consequence, being a most perfect and complete photographer.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0008.xml
article
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14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23
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ELLIS ISLAND 1757-1954
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Shirley Burden
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Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0009.xml
article
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THE EDUCATION OF PICTURE MINDED PHOTOGRAPHERS
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A Symposium / Part 3
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The symposium concludes with the present issue and we wish to take this opportunity to thank the various instructors and professors who have generously contributed their time and effort to this project.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0010.xml
article
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24,25,26,27,28
THE EDUCATION OF PICTURE MINDED PHOTOGRAPHERS
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THE FIRST INDIANA UNIVERSITY PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
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HENRY HOLMES SMITH
The First Indiana University Photography Workshop was conducted for a three-week period in June of 1956. The first week was devoted to the interpretation and analysis of photographs, the second to making pictures in four quite different situations, and the third to group study of those made during the Workshop and others that had been gathered for the occasion from all over the country.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0011.xml
article
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29,30,31,32
THE EDUCATION OF PICTURE MINDED PHOTOGRAPHERS
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TEACHING THE HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY
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BEAUMONT NEWHALL
The history of photography is such a new field of academic discipline that it is hardly possible at this date to formulate an ideal course of study. It may be helpful to others engaged in teaching it, to describe briefly the courses in the subject which have been given in Rochester during the past three years.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0012.xml
article
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33,34,35,36,37,38
THE EDUCATION OF PICTURE MINDED PHOTOGRAPHERS
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THE DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY AT THE ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
1. THE DEPARTMENT IN GENERAL
2. THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SECTION
3. THE ILLUSTRATIVE DIVISION
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C. B. NEBLETTE
HOLLIS N. TODD
RALPH M. HATTERSLEY
It is not surprising that Rochester, the home of Eastman Kodak, Graflex, Haloid, and other well-known names in photography, should have a school of photography. Nor is it surprising that it should be concerned with the science of photography and the manufacture of photographic materials.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0013.xml
article
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39,40
NOTES AND COMMENTS
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NOTES & COMMENTS
CENTRO PER LA CULTURA NELLA FOTOGRAFIA
AUTUMN EXHIBITION OF PICTORIAL PHOTOGRAPHY 1957
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Advancement on the cultural front of photography seems to be growing rapidly in Europe. And the Center for Culture in Photography seems to be the most recent organization to be added to the groups we already know something about: Combined Societies in England, "fotoform" in Germany, Group 16 in France, Unione Fotografica in Italy.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0014.xml
article
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40,41
BOOK REVIEWS
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THE FOCAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PHOTOGRAPHY
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The Focal Press Encyclopedia is by far and large, especially large, the best of the dictionaries and encyclopedias on photography yet to be published. In fact it is the first in photography to attain the stature of "encyclopedia" in the best sense of that word.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0015.xml
article
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41,42
BOOK REVIEWS
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Edited by Beaumont Newhall / ON PHOTOGRAPHY
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Typical of editor Beaumont Newhall to put photography to work in a book on photography—the pages are facsimile reproductions of the pages of the original publications. And what charm the old fashioned type faces evoke—quaint, curious they bespeak their times that nothing short of a period movie could match.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0016.xml
article
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
From Clemens Kalischer of Stockbridge, Massachusetts
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To examine photography as an art is certainly a most important task, but if this leads to the more or less conscious imitation of painting styles (even if modern) we find ourselves returning right to the beginning, with a new type of formalism and pictorialism.
Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0017.xml
advertisement
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aperture
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aperture
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Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0018.xml
article
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44
Back Cover
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Back Cover
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Aperture_19570101_1957_017_0019.xml