Article: 19160701030

Title: How to Make a Sewing-Screen

19160701030
191607010030
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0030.xml
How to Make a Sewing-Screen
WOOD FOR FRAME
LEATHER FOR COVERING
Fitting Windows With Weights
How to Remove Iodine Stains
Building a Poultry-House with a Skylight
Some Curtain Suggestions
How to Pack Mirrors to Prevent Breaking
A Clothes-Line Prop That Will Not Drop or Slip
This prop is stable yet detachable
A Hoop with a Guiding Hub
Wood Blocks for Flooring
Finding the Right-Sized Nail
Improving a Kitchen Knife
An Improved Roller-Towel
Let Your Ice-Cream Freeze While Motoring
To Screen Doors and Windows
A Home-Made Table-Ton Varnish
Concealed Ventilation
Removing Heat Spots from a Table
A Merry-Go-Round Swing
How to Make a Practical Gas-Range Lighter
Making the Cellarway Serve Two Purposes
For Cleaning Leather Upholstery
How to Make a Door-Mat from Old Rope-Ends
A Back-Saving Refrigerator
Renovating the Lawn
0161-7370
Popular Science
Bonnier
149
149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157
article
INSTEAD of a workbasket, with spools of thread, buttons, scissors, embroidery, hoops, etc., all crowded into a small space, a screen can be used, which has a definite place for every article used in sewing. The spools of thread are kept on brass pegs; the silks in one place and the cottons in another.
Illustrations
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How to Make a Sewing-Screen

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The screen can be easily carried from one room to another, or on to the veranda
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INSTEAD of a workbasket, with spools of thread, buttons, scissors, embroidery, hoops, etc., all crowded into a small space, a screen can be used, which has a definite place for every article used in sewing. The spools of thread are kept on brass pegs; the silks in one place and the cottons in another. The scissors, pincushion and emery ball are suspended from hooks. Patterns, embroidery-hoops,buttons,etc., all have pockets where they are readily accessible and yet kept in good shape. Best of all, the screen is light and can be easily carried from one room to another, or on to the veranda. In sewing, a small shelf may be lowered for holding the work. With a few materials anyone handy with tools can make this ornamental and useful piece of furniture. The materials needed are as follows:

WOOD FOR FRAME

as 42 ins. by l£ ins. by £ in. I2£ ins. by i£ ins. by £ in. 125 ins. by 9 ins. by £ in. I2 ins. by ins. by £ in. I2£ ins. by i£ ins. by £ in. I2£ ins. by £ in. by £ in.

LEATHER FOR COVERING

2 pieces I3£ ins. by 36 ins.

I “ I3£ ins. by 8 ins.

1 “ I3£ ins. by 4 ins.

35 brass pins, 2 ins. long

2 hinges; and screws

1 hook and eyebolt

2 handles; and screws

4 short screws 12 hooks 100 fancy tacks 50 nails

Select two pieces, and

of the longer or upright on them indicate with a pencil the points for attaching the crosspieces. Suppose the left-hand side of the screen is to be made first. The upper edge of the uppermost cross-piece should be i££ ins. from the tops of the posts. The top surface of the next lower crosspiece should be 13^ ins. from the tops of the posts. The one next the bottom is 3i>£ ins. from the top; and the under

surface of the bottom piece is 4^ ins. from the floor.

On two of the cross-pieces drive seven long brass pins an equal distance apart, as shown in the illustration, taking care to have their tops all even. It is better to drill holes slightly smaller than the pegs before putting them in, especially if the wood is oak or other hard wood. Into the under surface of the top crosspiece screw seven eyebolts, as shown.

Next, assemble the posts and crosspieces. Use fine wire nails, being careful not to split the wood. Strong hot glue should be applied at the same time to secure greater strength. Before proceeding allow the work to become thoroughly dry.

On the inside of each of the two upright posts, about in. from the back edge and 22 ins. from the top, insert a screw, allowing it to protrude about % in. Then, holding the shelf, which is the rectangular piece, 12 3^8 ins. x 9 ins.

x yi in., in position, with its upper edge just under these screws, locate the two points for its pivoting screws. This is clearly shown in the illustration. The pivoting screws will work more easily if t*he holes are first made with a slightly larger screw. The back screws hold the shelf in a horizontal position when it is being used. At other times, it can be raised to a vertical position between the posts.

The top and bottom pieces on the right side have the same location as those on the left. The second cross-piece is io ins. from the tops of the posts. Just under it is attached the piece 12^4 x 3yi x This piece does not need to be nailed ; glue will answer. Attached to its under edge and projecting forward horizontally, is the narrow strip, I2>^ x yi x y(. Attached to the front edge of this piece, and slanting forward obliquely, as shown in the illustration, is the piece, 12yi x iyi x These three pieces should be nailed to one another with two or three fine wire nails, which can be readily concealed.

The third cross-piece on the right is i8>^ ins. and the fourth piece 27 ins. respectively, measured from the tops of the posts. Before joining them to the uprights, they should be fitted with brass pins, as shown. The top piece should be provided with hooks.

Before proceeding further, the various parts should be varnished, stained or painted, according to individual taste. If the screen is to be used in a bedroom having white woodwork, white enamel may be used to advantage. If the woodwork is mahogany or oak, the screen can be finished to match. After the parts are thoroughly dry, the leather or other covering is put on. If leather is used, it should match not only the finish of the screen, but the color scheme of the room. If white enamel is used, a pretty chintz pattern is very effective as a covering, or silk may be used. In putting on the leather or chintz, be careful to stretch it tightly over the frame, gradually proceeding from top to bottom, inserting the tacks on both sides simultaneously. The edges should be folded in about yi in.; and the tacks should be driven into the middle of the frame. If silk is used, it may be shirred on a cord at the top and

bottom, instead of being tacked. The two inside strips which form the pockets at the bottoms are attached by turning in their edges and tacking on the inside. The measurements given are large enough to allow for folding in the upper edges several inches.

Lastly, fasten two small brass hinges on the back, 7J^ ins. from the top and bottom, respectively. On the front, attach a hook and eyebolt, i8J^ ins. from the top, for holding the twro parts of the screen together when not in use. On the top cross-pieces fasten two brass handles, as shown. They should be near the front inner edge of the frame, so that they will come together when the screen is closed.

Fitting Windows With Weights

IN the illustration is shown the way in which seventy-five windows in a factory building were fitted with sash cords, pulleys and weights. The method is simple, inexpensive, neat and the pulleys and weights are out of the way. The upper end of the window frame is cut away at an angle as shown, just enough to make a seat for the pulley. This brings the weight in the corner at the inside edge of the window frame and against the building wall. The other end of the rope is fastened to a screw-eye in the top of the window sash. These weights, when out of order can be repaired by anyone.—M. E. DUGGAN.

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An efficient window device
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How to Remove Iodine Stains

THE dark brown stains caused by iodine are unaffected by soap or other cleaning substance. To remove, let the article soak over night in starchy water, which will remove all trace of the stain.—R. L. BIRD.

Building a Poultry-House with a Skylight

SOMETHING out of the ordinary in poultryhouse construction is shown in the accompanying plans. All the windows are in the roof. The house stands the long way, north and south, so that during the day the sun’s rays will reach all parts of the coop. The secret of building poultry-houses right is largely a matter of admitting the greatest possible amount of sunlight. In the plan shown this factor is well cared for.

This house is 21 ft. by 33 ft., with eaves 5^2 ft. from the grade. The walls are of hollow clay tile and 5 ins. thick. The foundation and the floor are of concrete mixed 113:5.

The structure has a simple gable roof covered with prepared roofing. The roof is at third pitch; rafters at 2 ft. centers. Matched

sheathing is used as a roof foundation. Every other skylight sash—on both sides of the peak of the roof—is hinged to be opened for ventilation and airing. A 20-in. galvanized ventilator is placed at the rear, and in the rear gable-end is a barn-sash, which is hinged to swing up.

A coop of this size will comfortably shelter more than a hundred full-grown birds. The covered nests are built in

along the side walls, and the roosts are all at the rear end of the house. Materials, such as lumber, tile, and cement, as listed herewith, will be needed :

17 bbls. cement for floor and footing.....$24.00 8 yards clean, coarse, sharp sand....... 8.00 12 yards well-graded gravel or stone..... 12.00 650 hollow clay building-blocks......... 26.00 I dozen anchor-bolts 5-8 in. by 12 ins... 1.00 4 pcs. 2 ins. by 6 ins. by 16 ft. for plates 35 pcs. 2 ins. by 4 ins. by 14 ft. for rafters 16 pcs. i in. by 6 ins. by 16 ft. for cross-ties 17.00 1000 ft. 8-inch ship-lap for sheathing.... 30.00 8 squares three-ply roofing material.... 24.00 12 skylight-sash 4 ft. by 4 ft............ 24.00 I barn-sash for rear, 4 Its. loins, by 12 ins. 1.00

i galvanized metal ventilator 20 ins.... 12.00 200 ft. lineal 1 in. by 4 ins. finish lumber. 2.00 125 ft. lineal 1 in. by 6 ins. finish lumber. 2.00 36 ft. galvanized metal ridge-roll....... 2.00 i screen door 3 ft. by 7 ft............. 2.00 125 sq. ft. 1-2 inch hardware cloth...... 6.00 24 pcs. 2 ins. by 4 ins. by 10 ft._for roosts and supports 5 pcs. i in. by 12 ins. by 16ft. for nests.. 7.00 Total............................$200.00 W. E. FRUDDEN.

Some Curtain Suggestions

SEW two small rust-proof hooks at the extreme lower corners of your lace curtains on the right side. On sweeping day or when you wish the windows open, hook them up any desired height out of the way. The weight will not stretch the mesh in the least.

Use small round wooden toothpicks to pin your curtains to the rod, and avoid the unsightly rust spots made by common pins by sewing on small bone or brass rings of substantial design.

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A poultry-house which considers the interests of the hens is here described. All the windows are in the roof. The walls are of hollow tile, the floor is of concrete and a galvanized-iron ventilator furnishes fresh air. Poultry-houses should admit the greatest possible amount of fresh air
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Two strips of strong paper are an effective means of protecting a mirror from breaking
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How to Pack Mirrors to Prevent Breaking

WHEN mirrors are to be stored or to be shipped by mail, they may be securely packed in the following manner: Carefully paste two strips of stout brown paper diagonally across the mirror, as shown in the illustration. In the case of very large mirrors, use several strips of paper. Then wrap carefully in heavy Manila PAPER.-G. H. HOLDEN.

A Clothes-Line Prop That Will Not Drop or Slip

AN improvement over the ordinary clothes-line prop is shown in the accompanying figure. It is made of spruce, I in. by 2 ins., and as long as needed. A hole is cut at the top, as shown. This allows the user to raise or lower the line without allowing the prop to fall. Yet it can be detached readily. The slanting cut at the bottom prevents slipping on the ground and the point may be shod with a piece of hoopIRON.-JAMES E. NOBLE.

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This prop is stable yet detachable

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A piece of hoop-iron strengthens the lower end. An L-shaped notch at the upper end holds the line securely
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A Hoop with a Guiding Hub

THE attached drawings illustrate an improvement over the old-style hoop.

Instead of a plain hoop, four spokes with a hub are added, and in place of the plain, straight stick, for giving the hoop motion, a stick with a slight upcurve at one end is used.

This hoop may be started from the hand as well as stopped and picked up without stooping, and is at all times under control. Motion to the hoop is given by pushing it along as shown at the left in the illustration below. A straight view of hoop, with a notch for the stick on either side of hub, is also shown, as well as the method of holding, starting and picking up the hoop by means of this curved stick.

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An ingenious hoop has a hub for guiding
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Wood Blocks for Flooring

CREOSOTED wood blocks, already extensively used as paving material for city streets, have been coming into use as flooring for the last four or five years. Durability, noiselessness under heavy traffic, and sanitary properties are chief advantages for paving and also give special value for making floors, especially for use where heavy trucking, the moving of heavy machinery, or other severe use makes the maintenance of floors a serious problem. The rather high cost is the chief disadvantage in the use of wood blocks.

Wood blocks are now widely used for flooring in factories, warehouses, machine shops, foundries, various types of platforms, wharves, and docks, and for such miscellaneous purposes as hotel kitchens, hospitals, laundries, and slaughter houses.

Finding the Right-Sized Nail

HAVE you ever hunted for a nail of a certain size and finally used one that was either too small or too large? You probably have, though a case could be made which would obviate all such difficulties. A deep box, of convenient size for carrying around, anil filled with trays partitioned off to hold the different sizes, makes a good case. In the top tray, place the nails which you are most likely to need. They should also have the largest compartments.

If a stationary case is desired, a sort of cupboard with pigeon-holes can be attached to the wall of the barn or garage. A wooden strip about an inch and a half in width, can be tacked along the bottom of the pigeon-holes to keep the nails from rolling out.

Improving a Kitchen Knife

COOKS in hotels and restaurants are much annoyed by the use of light American-made “French knives,” which when used for any length of time each

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A piece of wood fitted on to the back of a knife-blade saves pressure on the hand
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day form a calloused place on the forefinger. To remedy this condition the writer has thought of a little device which helps considerably. Take a short length of dowel, saw a groove in it, and slip it in close to the handle. It may be riveted on if desired, as shown in the ILLUSTRATION.-PAUL REX.

An Improved Roller-Towel

ANEW arrangement for roller-towels consists of an upright frame attached to the wall. It has two boxes, one at the top and one at the bottom, with a space of 2 ft. between them. The folded towel is stored in the upper box, from which it descends over rollers to the lower box. The towel is used in the space between the boxes. By drawing on the towel, a fresh portion can be had at all times.

Not only is . this towel arrangement desirable for hotels, restaurants, clubs and the like, but it is also perfectly suitable for a private bathroom in the home.—F. P. MANN.

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This towel rack presents a fresh portion of the towel at all times
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Let Your Ice-Cream Freeze While Motoring

A VACUUM freezer which will freeze cream automatically in half an hour, and keep it frozen for eight hours, is a recent addition to modern picnicking equipment. The vacuum between the outer wall and the ice compartment causes the ice to spend all of its force on the cream, thus insuring more speed and less cost than the old method. One filling of ice will freeze two fillings of cream. In using this new device the cream is poured in one end and the ice and salt in the other, thus preventing any possibility of grains of salt in the ice-cream. If the freezing is begun when a motoring party leaves home, the ice-cream will be ready when they reach the picnic ground. The freezer, being made of white enamel-ware, is sanitary and clean.

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A vacuum ice-cream freezer
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To Screen Doors and Windows

IN screening doors and windows, it is highly desirable that the wire screens should not bulge or wrinkle, and that they should be as taut as possible between the frames. In the accompanying illustration, a method is shown for accomplishing this. One end of the door or frame to be screened is made

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Here is a simple way of stretching a screen taut on a frame
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to rest on the steps, and the other rests on the floor or walk. By means of a piece of wire or cord and the screw-eye in the floor,'the center of the door is sprung so that it is held 3" or 4" below the sides. The door must be held in this sprung position until the wire screen has been completely tacked in place. The tacking should begin at the center and proceed to the corners of the frame. When the tacking is completed, the door or frame can be released from its taut position ; and it will be found that a neat job, with a well-stretched screen free from wrinkles and bulges, will be the reSULT.-E. B. WILLIAMS.

A Home-Made Table-Ton Varnish

FOLLOWING is a recipe for a good varnish, suitable for experimental and wireless benches, and also for instrument bases. It gives a finish very much like hard rubber:

Mix enough lampblack with shellac to make the mixture black, but not enough to thicken it much. After sandpapering the wood smooth, apply two coats of the varnish, sandpapering lightly after each coat. Over this put one or two coats of dull varnish. This makes the wood waterproof, preserves it, and improves the appearance of the table-top.

Concealed Ventilation

THE diagram shows a simple scheme of ventilation, which may be employed on any window by extending the top of the upper half so that it pockets higher into the wall. When the window is in position for ventilating, the top is pulled down slightly, as shown in Fig. 1. This permits air to enter through the “middle joint,” as indicated by the arrows, and it is deflected upward, just as it should be. The top, it will be noted, is still sealed.

The appearance of the window when closed is shown in Fig. 2. It always looks like an ordinary window, and the absence of any attachment makes it the acme of simplicity.

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Fig. 1
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Fig. 2
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Removing Heat Spots from a Table

THE white spots, caused by hot dishes, can be removed by rubbing fresh lard on them. The lard should be rubbed in with the fingers. If the spots are very bad it will be necessary to leave the lard on a few hours. It is then rubbed off with a soft cloth. The lard will not injure the finish of the table. A finely polished dining-table, otherwise ruined by hot dishes, can be thus reclaimed.

A Merry-Go-Round Swing

A MERRY-GO-ROUND swing is easy to make if the following directions are carefully observed.

The necessary materials and their exact measurements are as follows:

1 pipe 2 ins. by 8 ft..........For vertical shaft

2 pcs. i in. by 3 ins. by 10 ft......For cross-arm

2 iron rods \ in. by 6 ft......For cross-arm guys

2 pcs. 2 ins. by 4 ins. by 6 ft.. For foundation cross 4 pcs. 2 ins. by 2 ins. by

4 ft. 3 ins........For center bearing braces

2 pcs. 2 ins. by 8 ins. by 8 ins. (oak)....For bearings

2 iron plates 6 ins. by 6 ins........For bearings

2 machine bolts \ in. by 2\ ins. .For top bearing 4 machine bolts I in. by

4! ins................For bottom bearing

4 lag-screws \ in. by 3 ins......For top bearing

4 carriage bolts * in. by

2\ ins. . .For cross-arm ends (2 to each end) 2 carriage bolts \ in. by

4§ ins.........For cross-arm center blocks

2 pcs. i in. by 10 ins. by 18 ins........For seats

16 ft. Manila rope..................For swings

Any soft wood will be suitable.

Begin with the foundation-cross, Fig. I. Find the center of the two cross-pieces; half notch them to fit flush, and nail together. The foundationcross is then ready to receive the bottom bearing, Fig. 2. Bore a hole 2% ins. in diameter in the center of the block. Bolt one of the iron plates between the block and the foundation-cross, using two machine bolts 4F2 ins. long. This completes the foundation-cross and bottom bearing. The top bearing is made the same as the bottom bearing, only the hole runs through the iron plate.

The four braces are sawed at the ends to an angle of forty-five degrees, and firmly nailed to the ends of the foundation-cross, thus bringing the ends together at the top. Next, the top bearing is firmly screwed on the end of the braces, using four F^-in. by 3-in. lagscrews, taking care first to bore the holes with a gimlet. Now we will put the center shaft into place. If a pipe of the given dimension is not available an old boiler-tube of the same dimensions will answer the purpose. For the cross-arm 4> the two pieces of the dimensions above given are bolted together at the ends, using two bolts to each end.

Now bolt two blocks 1 in. on each side of the center, the blocks to be 2 ins. thick. Thus we have a hole 2 ins. square, enough space for the center shaft to run through. Now bore a>^-in. hole at each end of the arms to receive the stay-rods, which are threaded at one end only, the other end being bent in the shape of a hook to catch on the rim of the center shaft. Now slip the crossarm over the shaft, bolt the ends of the rods to the ends of the arms, and hook the other ends on the shaft. Make the two boards for the swing seats Fig. 5, with the dimensions already given; bore a ^-in. hole at the ends of the boards to receive the rope. Now run the rope through the holes and knot them so that they will not slip out of place, the swings being tied to the cross-arm. The merry-go-round swing is now complete and can be set firmly by driving stakes into the ground at the end of the foundation-cross and securely nailing them.—O. B. LAURENT.

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This open-air swing can vie with the Pied Piper of Hamlin
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An electrical attachment for lighting the gas-range can be installed in any kitchen
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How to Make a Practical Gas-Range Lighter

THE following gas-range lighter is one in which there are no parts to get out of order, no coils and no batteries. Once installed it will last for years without attention. The illustration will serve to show how the connections are to be made. In detail they are as follows : Procure a 250-watt bulb, or, if not available, a 100-watt bulb will answer the purpose for a no-volt direct-current circuit, which is the current generally supplied to homes. Obtain a socket, two pieces of single-strand flexible cord and a wooden handle through which there has been made a hole. Connect the two wires to the socket and extend one end of the wire over to the chandelier in the kitchen and connect this to one of the wires inside the canopy at the top, being careful to clean both by scraping with a knife. Be sure to replace the insulation. Then place the bulb in the socket. Turn on the current and touch the gas-range with the free end from the bulb. If the light burns, the connection at the chandelier has been made correctly. If not, disconnect the wire and connect

it with the other wire at the chandelier. The light will then burn when connected with the range as before.

Now suspend the light from the ceiling. Run the end of the cable through the handle and solder to the end of it a piece of heavy copper wire in the shape of a ring. Push back into the handle until it is tight.

To light the gas-range, all that is necessary is to turn on the gas, take down the handle and touch the range at the point where the gas is issuing and it will light immediately. Light may also be used as an auxiliary by leaving it connected to the range. This arrangement will light the stove 10,000 times, for from ten to twelve cents’ worth of current. This will not work on a stove that is connected to the main by means of a rubber hose, unless there is a wire connected to the stove and to a gaspipe in addition to the apparatus just described. This device works just as well on an ordinary gas-jet as on the range.—C. B. CLOUD.

Making the Cellarway Serve Two Purposes

IN a small house shelf space for storage was scarce and the following plan was made available for shelving the wall of the inside stairs to the cellar. A hinged door was made to fit over the stair-well and to fold back against the wall when the stairs are in use. A pulley and weight move the drop door easily and make of it a temporary floor upon which one may walk to reach the shelves. The use of the pulley is not necessary, provided the door is made of some light, soft wood.

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This stairway saves space
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For Cleaning Leather Upholstery

HOUSEWIVES are apt to use most any kind of oil, grease or even furniture polish on the leather upholstering of their furniture, and frequently with very bad results. The oils soil the clothing and the polish ruins the leather.

To overcome this trouble a sales manager of a large eastern furniture house made tests of many fluids prepared for the purpose, some of which were very satisfactory. Finally a chemist was consulted, and the reply was, “Use sweet milk.” The furniture house immediately tried the use of mopping the upholstering. with milk, and the results were very gratifying. The leather should be gone over three times annually, and after being smeared for several minutes, the milk should be wiped off with a clean cloth. The leather will be sufficiently oiled, thoroughly cleansed and will not soil the clothing.

How to Make a Door-Mat from Old Rope-Ends

TAKE a piece of canvas about 18 ins. by 30 ins., hem it all around and mark it off in lines about 1F4 ins. apart. After you have marked the canvas, take old rope, spread it out, and cut the strands into pieces 4 ins. long. These pieces are called “thumbings.” Fray both ends of these thumbings and you are ready to start sewing. Use a heavy sail or sack needle and sew these thumbings through the middle to the canvas, using the “back-stitch.” When sewing, follow the lines on the canvas and sew the thumbings close; draw your thread tight. When you have finished you will have a door mat that will clean dirty or muddy shoes better than any mat on the market and it will last longer.

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Old rope-ends are useful in making a durable mat for the outside door
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A Back-Saving Refrigerator

/VN unusual idea has been carried out il in a new home in Iowa, where the housewife believes in having kitchen storage places as near as possible to waist-height, to prevent wearisome stooping or stretching. Not only the utensil and china cupboards, but also the built-

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Ice can be admitted through outside doors with no inconvenience
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in refrigerator is located above the floor. This refrigerator is set into the kitchen wall and is iced from the back entry. Its base is about 30 ins. from the floor. The convenience of the iceman, who must lift the ice, is served by steps in the outside hall.—A. G. VESTAL.

Renovating the Lawn

THE most effective way to renovate the old lawn is to make a new one. In most cases it will not pay to attempt to patch a poor grass plot for the difficulty probably is due to lack of proper soil conditions, and these cannot be satisfactorily remedied without an entire remaking of the lawn.

If the lawn is on a good soil and is merely disfigured with weeds, it can be brought into satisfactory condition by scratching the surface with a rake after removing the weeds, and seeding with well cleaned seed, using about one-half as much as for a new seeding. Bone meal, a complete commercial fertilizer and nitrate of soda may then be added with satisfactory results.