Article: 19160701029

Title: The Home Workbench

19160701029
191607010029
PopularScience_19160701_0089_001_0029.xml
The Home Workbench
Making a Washing-Machine From a Barrel
A Package Tie Made of Tape
Making a Lawn Chair
0161-7370
Popular Science
Bonnier
147
147,148
article
A VERY serviceable washing-machine can be made from an old barrel-churn whose capacity is from fifteen to twenty-five gallons. First construct, of heavy galvanized-iron, a cylinder about 30 ins. long and of the same diameter as the head of the churn.
Diagrams
Illustrations
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The Home Workbench

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Making a Washing-Machine From a Barrel

A VERY serviceable washing-machine can be made from an old barrelchurn whose capacity is from fifteen to twenty-five gallons. First construct, of heavy galvanized-iron, a cylinder about 30 ins. long and of the same diameter as the head of the churn. One end of this cylinder should be left open and the head of the churn, with its locking-device, fastened to the open end. Find the balancing-point of the cylinder with the head on. Fasten the churn bearings on with rivets and solder to make a watertight joint.

Make two screens of galvanized wire, with about i-in. mesh. One of these is suspended from the movable head by >£-in. galvanized-iron rods, and the other is fastened in the cylinder, so that they are about 10 ins. apart and occupy the middle part of the cylinder.

In the diagrams 1 represents the cylinder; 2, the movable head; 3, the brackets which hold it; 4, the bearings; 5, the frame supports; 6, the handle; 7, a small drain-cock; 8, the locking device for the head; 9 and 10, the screens, and 11, the rods that support the top one.

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By fitting two galvanized-iron wire screens in a barrel-churn, a serviceable washingmachine can be made
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The action is, of course, the same as that of the churn, the clothes being confined between the screens; the water, surging back and forth thoroughly cleans them.—J. FRANK DWIGGINS.

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The simplicity of this tape is its chief merit. When drawn up taut, a tiny ring holds it securely in place
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A Package Tie Made of Tape

RECOGNIZING that the string is best for tying a package of papers, it only remained for some one to work out a method of making a holding device that would not require making a knot and have something that would hold the papers tightly, yet be of such character that it could be quickly released.

This tie has been accomplished by a small ring placed on a piece of tape, the tape having knots in the ends to prevent the ring coming off. It is only necessary to slip the looped end of the tape over the package and pull on one end of the tape. To release the holding grip, pull on the other end of the tape. The tapes are made up in various lengths to suit the packages. This invention will add to the efficiency of any office, at small expense.

Making a Lawn Chair

THE accompanying drawing shows a chair for use on the lawn. The materials required are hardwood strips 74 in. by 21/2 ins.; one 74 inround iron or steel-rod threaded on each end with two nuts; two ¿^-in. bolts, 2^4 ins. long under the head; two 74-in. bolts 2¿^ ins. long with two nuts each; two ¿^-in. or J^-in. dowels, 2^2 ins. long; one strip of awning stripe duck, or stair crash, 20 ins. wide, one piece of ]/2-in. pipe, some ¿^-in. washers, and from twelve to sixteen ounces of upholsterer’s tacks.

To make the chair shown cut two strips 4 1/6 ins. long, and two strips say forty to forty-six inches long. Mortise near top of the two long strips for the crossbar. Cut the mortise 74 in. by 2 ins. in size. The crossbar is 1 ft. 1/10 ins. long with a 74~’in• shoulder on each side at each end 74 in. long.

At the other end bore a ¿4-in. hole in each strip and fit a 74-in. dowel into it. This dowel is also 1 ft. 1/10 ins. long. All these joints should be carefully squared, fitted tight, glued and wedged. Glue the wedges before you drive them, and make chisel-splits for starting the wedges. Do the same thing to the shorter pieces. Bore a ¿'g-in. hole in both short pieces at the upper end. This is for the bolt holding the arm-rest. Cut out the arm-rests, as shown in the illustration, for the adjustable hooks. These hooks are made by boring ¿^-in. holes in the exact center of the strip and making saw-cuts to remove the wedge of wood. Round both ends and also round the top ends of the shorter frame.

Lay off fifteen inches from the bottom of the long frame, and twenty-five inches from the bottom of the short frame. Bore 74~'mholes in both, at the points marked. The steel pivot rod, ^8-in. diameter, is twenty-five inches long. It is threaded on each end for a hexagon nut. Six 74~'mcommon washers, and a piece of ¿^-in. wroughtiron pipe 1 ft. 8 ins. long are required.

Put the rod through the hole in the short frame. Put on a washer; then through the hole in the long frame, another washer; slip on the piece of pipe; a washer; hole in the long frame; a washer; hole in short frame; another washer. Put a washer on the outside of the short frame, and put on both nuts; screw up fairly tight, and burr the end of the rod, riveting it down on the nuts, so they cannot back off.

Pivot the arm-rest in the hole at the top of the short frame, with a ¿/g-in. bolt 2/4 ins. long under the head, but make it a loose fit, and burr down the threads to keep the nut in place. Bore a hole through the side-bars of the long frame, 2 ft 3 ins. from the top. Put into each hole a ¿^-in. bolt, 2^4 ins. long under the head, with a thread 2 ins. long. Screw up a nut on this thread until it joins. Push the thread through the bored hole from the outside, screw up the other nut tight, and burr the threads. The notches in the arm-bar hook on this bolt and make the chair adjustable.

Fasten the crash or canvas to the crossbars with tacks, tacking on top, and taking a full wrap of the canvas around the crossbar so that the tacks are covered. This prevents strain on the tacks when the chair is in use. Allow slack as shown, so that the body of the sitter cannot touch the crossrod. The canvas will conform to the body like a hammock. The chair should be painted or varnished for protection against the elements.

This practical lawn chair can be subjected to much wear and tear without suffering any damage.—H. S. RINKER.

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This adjustable chair, which can be made by an amateur from ordinary materials, forms an attractive summer feature of the lawn
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