Article: 19160101017

Title: Saving Steps at Target Practice

19160101017
191601010017
PopularScience_19160101_0088_001_0017.xml
Saving Steps at Target Practice
An Electric Flat Iron Float.
0161-7370
Popular Science
Bonnier
95
95
article
AN electrical target that signals the exact accuracy of the marksman to an indicator on the firing line has been installed on the shooting range of the United States marines at San Francisco, Calif. The method of signaling the accuracy of shots which is now employed on nearly all government ranges is not at all satisfactory, as it is difficult to convey to the man on the firing line the explicit information of the closeness of his shot to the bull’s eye.
Photographs
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Saving Steps at Target Practice

AN electrical target that signals the exact accuracy of the marksman to an indicator on the firing line has been installed on the shooting range of the United States marines at San Francisco, Calif. The method of signaling the accuracy of shots which is now employed on nearly all government ranges is not at all satisfactory, as it is difficult to convey to the man on the firing line the explicit information of the closeness of his shot to the bull’s eye.

An elaborate system of flag and disc signalling is usually employed. This requires, at least on the long distance ranges, the use of field glasses. When the marksman fires a shot at a target, the “spotter” in the distant pit lowers the target and raises a signal to denote the numerical accuracy. A white disc denotes a bull’s eye; a red flag, a miss, with other emblems to denote whether the bullet pierced ring No. 4, 3 or 2.

This procedure requires a large corps of men both in the pits as spotters, and on the range behind the individual marksman, as scorers. Moreover, it is confusing, and there is no satisfactory way of signalling whether the bullet which missed the bull's eye went too far to the left or right; too high, or too low.

The electrical target, as it is called, corrects a great many of these faults, although its installation cost is considerably higher. In appearance, it resembles a number of large ventilating fans superimposed one upon the other, each one smaller than the one beneath it. The bull’s eye is a thick' metal disc, painted black, which extends in front, of the blades. Steel plate is used in the construction. Behind the plates are electric contacts.

On the firing line is an electric indicator, which, in design, is a replica of the target. Each leaf of the target is represented by a miniature electric lamp on the indicator* When a bullet strikes one of the blades of the target, the contact made closes an electrical circuit con-

sisting of batteries, a cable to the indicator and one of the lights on the indicator. The action is immediate, the marksman knowing instantly not only his score but the exact place on the target where the bullet struck, so that he can adjust his rifle sights to conform with wind and temperature conditions. The target and indicator are marked to resemble a clock face, following a long established practice on rifle ranges.

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Media
The enormous electric flat-iron float has taken its place as an important feature of all civic parades
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Media

An Electric Flat Iron Float.

AFLOAT that was conceded to be among the best of the one hundred and seventeen in a recent parade held by the business men of Liberty, N. Y., was a representation of a popular electric iron. It was mounted on a small runabout.

Following the business men’s parade, the Firemen of Liberty held a parade and the “Iron” float was selected for participation as one of the best decorated in the previous event.

Realizing the advertising advantage, the company which made the float has had it mounted on the roof of the power house where it can be seen from all parts of the city.

The February Popular Science Monthly will be on sale Saturday, January fifteenth (West of Denver on Thursday, January twentieth).