Article: 20010401034

Title: SNAPSHOTS

20010401034
200104010034
PopularPhotography_20010401_0065_004_0034.xml
SNAPSHOTS
The Ballad of John and Yoko
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
SNAPSHOTS
36
36,38
article
“In 1972, I drove John Lennon and Yoko Ono from their Greenwich Village apartment to Brooklyn in my old Volvo. I wanted to shoot their picture on the Brooklyn Promenade, with the New York skyline behind them. I parked near the Promenade—John, in good spirits, sat on a hydrant hugging Yoko as I made the photo.
C.H.
H.K.
A.H.
Photographs
36
38

SNAPSHOTS

The Ballad of John and Yoko

“In 1972, I drove John Lennon and Yoko Ono from their Greenwich Village apartment to Brooklyn in my old Volvo. I wanted to shoot their picture on the Brooklyn Promenade, with the New York skyline behind them. I parked near the Promenade—John, in good spirits, sat on a hydrant hugging Yoko as I made the photo. John later decorated the hydrant with some flowers he bought.” So wrote Ben Ross, famed photojournalist, on the back of the print, shown at left. Ross is the most recent recipient of the American Society of Media Photographers’ Lifetime Achievement Award.

“I was sort of choked up about the award,” says 84-yearold Ross. “It’s a great honor.” Ross’s works are in the permanent collections of the International Center of Photography in New York; the Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian, and the National Portrait Gallery, both in Washington, D.C. A collection of Ross’s pictures will be traveling; venues and dates to be announced —C.H.

Russian Kodak film escapes!

If you were a Kodak film sentenced to be sold in Russia and you had a chance to break for freedom, where would you go so that the secret EK police wouldn’t find you? Aha! Who would ever uncover your identity, hidden amongst your American kin, in the gift shop at California’s Big Sur State Park? Sharp-eyed POP reader John H. Chapman spotted the Russian writing on the film box-—and the gray market jig was up!

Will Kodak swoop down and deport the poor little wretched escapee? Not a chance. Chapman is giving it a good home—at least until its expiration date. —H.K.

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© BEN ROSS
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“John and Yoko, Brooklyn Heights, NYC, 1972,” by Ben Ross.
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© MASON RESNICK
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Caught comrade: Vigilant American uncovers gray Russian in Big Sur.
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We love chocolate! And photograph So can you imagine our delight

these photowrapped chocolate bars! We tracked down graphic artist Anthony Grimando of Astor Chocolate and milke him for information. Turns out Grimando takes the film and digital shots submitted to him and enhances them in Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop to "add that extra pizzazz." The design is formatted to fit the wrapper—and presto, you've got collectible, postcard-perfect Caribbean palm trees, Philadelphia's cracked Liberty bell, and D.C.'s Honest Abe. After all, Grimando has never fudged a job. —A.H.

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© MEGAN DEY
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Sometimes you feel like a photo nut: Astor Chocolate's image-covered chocolate bars are a hit at tourist-site cariteens.
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Friedlander’s photos go legit!

The image on the left is typical of Lee Friedlander’s witty, enigmatic vintage ’60’s views of America’s social landscape. Its casual composition makes it look like a snapshot—something which offended photo critics when it first was shown—but it is part of a body of work that has influenced a generation of street-savvy shooters. Now, some 1,400 of his photos have been snapped up by two major art institutions.

The National Gallery of Art recently acquired over 450 of Friedlander’s images, representing four decades of his work. Not to be outdone, New York’s Museum of Modern Art (where he first exhibited, along with Garry Winogrand and Diane Arbus, in the controversial 1967 “New Documents” exhibit) acquired 1,000 career-spanning Friedlander prints. Not bad for a one-time outcast. —M.R.

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© LEE FRIEDLANDER/courtesy of National Gallery of Art
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Lee Friedlander’s shadowy self-portrait; New York City, 1966.
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’s monster

you have a 1977 Tizer Co. 1 10 camera disguised as a can of Orangina drink, rejoice. It's now worth $50 to $75. On the other hand, if you've been yearning for a 1956 Echo 8 camera built into a Zippo-type cigarette lighter, forget it. In its presentation box, it'll cost you about $2,500. Pictures and descriptions of these, plus photos and full information on over 25,000 other old and new cameras, including histories of most camera companies, are all contained in the just published 11th edition of McKeown's Price Guide to Antique &

Classic Cameras (2001-2002).

This 900-page, 8V2xl 1-inch seven pounder, a must for camera nuts (including POP's editors), contains info on 15,000 more cameras and has 2,500 new pictures, compared to the 10th edition. It's a cool $125 in soft cover, but Centennial Photo Service (phone 715-689-21 35; fax 715-689-2277; www.camera-net.com) will gladly quote you a hardcover price and all info on shipping costs. Hey, don't drink the Orangina. You'll ruin the camera.—H.K.

reappears

McKeown

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© MEGAN DEY
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From our stats dept.,

nferne

Why are we not surprised that 7 of the ten most-visited photo-related Web sites contain fine-art nudes? According to Photolinks.com, only three of their ten most-visited sites would be considered Grated. The most popular of all? Inexplicably, it's FoodPhotography.com—a stock photo site dedicated to images of edibles, no skin. Go figure. —M.R.

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q'~ Po~ QUIZ??

So you think you know your cameras inside and out? Meet a most peculiar inside-a no-kidding, transistorized, quality-constructed miniature 1 .5v-po~vered strobe unit, complete with: tin\' flash; LU) power-on indicator; holder for a AA hat terv; a variety of resistors and capacitors (one of which has a silver band, which results in grcater accuracy); and a transformer-all showing solid workmanship. Send us the correct make and model and win a year's subscription to Poi. E-mail our managing editor at mresnick@hfnimag.coni, or snail-mail us at POP1~L~R PI-IOTOGRAPEIY, 1633 Broadway, New York, NY 10019, by April 3. We'll reveal the answer-and the winner-in June.

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© MASON RESNICK (2)
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