Article: 19911101015

Title: 50 YEARS OF PHOTO THERAPY

19911101015
199111010015
PopularPhotography_19911101_0098_011_0015.xml
50 YEARS OF PHOTO THERAPY
Rehabilitation Through Photography visualizes its past, present, and future
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
25
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article
We would be hard-pressed to find a more sympatico, worthy organization that is dedicated to helping those less fortunate than Rehabilitation Through Photography (RTP). In cooperation with various agencies. clinics, hospitals, and schools in the New York City area, RTP helps people with physical and emotional handicaps, disadvantaged youths, the elderly, recovering substance abusers, and AIDS patients—all through photography.
Bob Lazaroff
Photographs
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50 YEARS OF PHOTO THERAPY

Rehabilitation Through Photography visualizes its past, present, and future

We would be hard-pressed to find a more sympatico, worthy organization that is dedicated to helping those less fortunate than Rehabilitation Through Photography (RTP). In cooperation with various agencies. clinics, hospitals, and schools in the New York City area, RTP helps people with physical and emotional handicaps, disadvantaged youths, the elderly, recovering substance abusers, and AIDS patients—all through photography.

For participating organizations, RTP supplies a working darkroom, cameras, and, if an institution cannot afford it, a threeto four-month supply of film and paper. R'I'P will also supply an instructor, though many programs don't need one because they're spearheaded by an employee with a knowledge of photography. In return, the participating organizations report monthly on the success of the program, the number of people involved, and the hours of instruction. They also take part in RTP's annual photo contest (two of this year’s winners are pictured here).

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BILL CHIP
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A helping hand: Thanks to RTP, a patient at the Goldwater Memorial Hospital in Manhattan gets hands-on experience in using a point-and shoot camera.
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Each organization puts RTP’s services to use differently. At one, a teacher in an inner-city elementary school has the students take snapshots of people working in their neighborhoods, then write about them; at another, RTP volunteers at a drug treatment center help participants to channel their interest off the streets and into the darkroom. In a third, a volunteer staff assists blind and visually impaired students in photographing, developing, and printing their own pictures. During the past year alone, RTP has run 43 different programs in various agencies, work-

ing with an estimated 1,000 participants.

T his month, RTP is sponsoring its 30th anniversary retrospective exhibition at the Cork Gallery in Avery bisher Hall, New York City, where it can be seen from November 22 through December 2. Spanning the period from RTP's inception during World War II as War Service Photography up to its present day and name, the show features five decades of work from many people whose lives have been enriched through photography.

Since RIP is a not-for-profit organization. tax-deductable contributions or donations of equipment are always appreciated. Please write RI P at 1133 Broadway. New York. NY I0010. or call (2I2) 924-7 HO. Bob Lazaroff

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Schoolyard snapshooter: This portrait by seven-year-old Eduardo Ortiz won First Grand Prize/Junior Division in the 1991 RTP photo contest. Eduardo takes part in the program sponsored by RTP at PS. 63 in New York City.
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Heard it through the grapevine: Lisa Davis, who takes part in an RTP program at E.N.T.E.R., a drug rehabilitation center in Manhattan, won First Grand Prize:Adult B&W Division in the 1991 contest for this image of a wintertime arbor in New York's Central Park.
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