Article: 19911101008

Title: Snapshots

19911101008
199111010008
PopularPhotography_19911101_0098_011_0008.xml
Snapshots
PORTRAITS R HER
A DECISIVE MOMENT, OR TWO
THE KINDEST CUT
LOCAL LAD MAKES GOOD!
ZONE V CREAM PUFF
THE ULTIMATE ARCHIVAL PRINT?
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
Snapshots
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5,7
article
How can you tell when you’re famous? Annie Leibovitz will knock on your door and ask to do your portrait, that’s how. Since 1970 and her first Rolling Stone cover, Leibovitz has photographed hundreds of stars and celebrities in her instantly recognizable style.
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Snapshots

PORTRAITS R HER

How can you tell when you’re famous? Annie Leibovitz will knock on your door and ask to do your portrait, that’s how.

Since 1970 and her first Rolling Stone cover, Leibovitz has photographed hundreds of stars and celebrities in her instantly recognizable style. Intimate, revealing, yet cool and classically composed, Leibovitz's portraits on the pages of Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, and from several well-known ad campaigns lave secured her reputation.

Now, for the first time, you can enjoy 1er work on a museum’s walls. Her show, 'Annie Leibovitz Photographs, 1970— 1990,” is traveling, with stops planned in nore than a dozen U.S. and European cites. It can be seen through December at he International Center of Photography, 1130 Fifth Ave., New York. For specific nformation about the remainder of the

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© 1991 ANNIE LEIBOVITZ
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"Ella Fitzgerald 1988” is one of Annie Leibovitz's portraits of celebrities included in her 20-year retrospective.
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tour, call (212) 640-5232.

Can't wait for the show? Look for the book (Harper Collins, New York). All 230 pages are available at bookstores now.

A DECISIVE MOMENT, OR TWO

French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson expounded his notion of the “decisive moment”—that perfect and unique instant in time when subject and back-

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FERNAWDE HARDY
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Beginner’s luck? Fernande Hardy, of Quebec, Canada, captured the image above, remarkably reminiscent of Henri Cartier-Bresson's famous "On the banks of the Marne, France 1938" (right), on her very first roll of film!
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ground unite to forge a distinctively revealing whole. Theoretically, the moment coincides with you, the photographer, firing your camera’s shutter release. An example of a Cartier-Bresson decisive moment, his “On the banks of the Marne, France 1938,“ appeared in this magazine

in May '91 in a feature | “Uncommonly Normal.” page 341 about the standard 50mm lens (that the photographer is known to extol).

Just how unique was that par ticular moment? Not very, an swers reader Marc Hardy of Que bec City. Indeed, when Hardy first saw Cartier-Bresson's fa mous image. it was déjà vu all over again: His wife, Fernande, had captured an equally decisive moment back in 1973 on a family vacation in Nova Scotia (left).

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HENRI-CARTIER BRESSON/MAGNUM
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While Cartier-Bresson may be flattered that someone had unintentionally appropriated his moment, he might well be chagrined to learn that Hardy made her version of this classic moment not after years in photography but on frame 11A of the first roll of film she ever-shot!

THE KINDEST CUT

People all over the country are gathering their friends around the TV set, bringing out the popcorn, and watching the big event that cost them thousands of dollars. You're wrong if you thought they were looking at a tape of a wedding or bar mitzvah. That’s com monplace. Instead, they're participating in a brand-new

trend: watching a tape of their surgery. That’s right—now you are able to

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High drama, right at home: A new Rx for recovery is viewing your own surgery, in color video, to assure yourself that everything went off—and out—OK.
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watch, in living color, as the surgeon de scends ever SO slowly with a uhiniature camera and light into your abdomen. As the operation unfolds, the doctor moni tors his actions on a video screen, talking all the while to record an ongoing guided tour of the procedure. Some even add an introduction explaining laparoscopic technique-minus background music. Many surgeons tape operations rou tinely to have a record of what happens during surgery, but only recently have they been giving copies to their patients. Why? They've found this satisfies a patient's curiosity and assuages fears about what actually went on. As one psychiatrist commented, "It makes people feel more secure, more in control, and there's rea son to suspect that they will then recover faster from their surgery."

LOCAL LAD MAKES GOOD!

One of P0IULAR's former senior editors, Russell Hart, recently enjoyed an honor accorded few. Eleven of his infrared pho tographs were displayed in what might be the world's largest space for a gallery: New York's Grand Central Station. Mounted on 28 x 28-inch Iightboxes located in a much-traveled terminal con course, Russell's black-and-white land scapes were on view to thousands of corn muters daily. Those who stopped to enjoy the work saw an intriguing series of large, translucent images that depicted the cu rious ways that humans interact with and

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RUSSELL HART
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Altered landscapes was the theme of Russell Hart's recent show in New York City's Grand Central Station.
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alter their environments. Sponsored by New York City's Met ropolitan Transit Authority's "Arts for Transit" program, the show was printed on 16 x 24-inch sheets cut from 48-inch rolls of Ilford's graphic-arts Line Film.

Working with such large iniages was new for Russell; he says he's been spoiled by their grand scale and would like to con tinue "printing big." Let's hope he hasn't been spoiled by the grand scale of the gallery, too!

ZONE V CREAM PUFF

Cadillac: `77 Sedan DeVille, mint, white with natural leather interior, musical horn, A/C, all power, loaded, low miles, best offer over $ 10K. Yes, sir, that's right, and Vic's Hassle-

selbiad Inc. has purchased the car from the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson and will auction it off, with pro ceeds going to Photographers + Friends United Against AIDS. The Caddy, along with six of Adams'

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JOHN SEXTON
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Camera Caddy: This Sedan DeVille was owned by none other than Ansel Adams. And now its for sale—for a good cause.
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Free Used Cars will throw in a Hasselblad 500 Classic rollfilm camera, a Bogen 3040 tripod, and 100 rolls of Kodak film. So come on in and make an offer! This is no ordinary Cadillac-it be longed to the late legend of the photo graphic world, Ansel Adams. Victor Has-

Hasselbiad images, will be on display at the Photo `91 show in New York City starting November 22. Bids ($10,000 minimum, only mail-in) should be sent to the accounting firm of Robert I. Flom, 55 Church Rd., Morganville, NJ 07751; (201) 227-7320.

THE ULTIMATE ARCHIVAL PRINT?

The result of a joint venture between Fuji Photo Film and max Corp., a major maker of tiles and sanitary earthenware (also known as toilet fixtures), has resulted in the world's first ceramic photo. It's Pho tocera, a photo claimed by Fuji not to fade when placed outdoors, immersed in the salt of seawater, or burned in a fire. In development for the past five years, the ceramic photo process involves using inorganic coloring agents to print images on ceramic substrates at high tempera tures. Scratch resistant and targeted for use as road signs, in interior decoration. and as gift purchases, it's available in dif ferent sizes; one photo measuring 5 x 7 inches will sell for approximately $580 for the first reproduction and $350 for the second. It's marketed only in Japan. 0

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Indestructible image? Just about. Photocera, the result of the world's first ceramic photo process, is said to be resistant to fading caused by the sun, a fire, or the salt of seawater. But will it break?
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