Article: 19860401064

Title: Books in Brief

19860401064
198604010064
PopularPhotography_19860401_0093_004_0064.xml
Books in Brief
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
Books in Brief
82
82,84
article
The Professional Photographer's Business Guide, by Frederic Rosen. Amphoto, 1515 Broadway, New York, NY 10036, 1985; 191 pp., hardcover, $22.50. Should you incorporate? Should your books be set up on a cash or accrual basis? Should you buy or rent your studio space?
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Books in Brief

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The Professional Photographer's Business Guide, by Frederic Rosen. Amphoto, 1515 Broadway, New York, NY 10036, 1985; 191 pp., hardcover, $22.50.

Should you incorporate? Should your books be set up on a cash or accrual basis? Should you buy or rent your studio space? With this book’s advice, which includes interviews with experts in various photography and financial fields, it can help you be successful in the photography business. The book is directed primarily to the person just starting out, but it has suggestions for established photographers who are looking for ways to develop new contacts and promote their businesses. E.H.S.

Chuck Stewart's Jazz Files, photographs by Chuck Stewart with text by Paul Carter Harrison and foreword by Billy Taylor. New York: New York Graphic Society/Little, Brown, and Co. 1985; 140 pp. with 165 black-and-white photographs; hardcover, $40, paperback, $16.95.

Not many people are fortunate enough to combine two great enthusiasms in one profession, but jazz buff Chuck Stewart is one exception. For the past 30 years he has specialized in photographs of jazz musicians at work and at rest.

Ranging from camera-frozen moments of actual performance and formal portraits (my favorite is an elegant image of bassist Major Holley made in 1959) to the more intimate glimpses candid portraiture provides, the collection is ar-

ranged by instrumental section and includes such legends as Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, and Louis Armstrong (Brass), Milt Hinton and Oscar Pettiford (Strings), Zoot Sims, Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis, and John Coltrane (Reeds), Thelonious Monk and Oscar Peterson (Keyboard), Max Roach, Gene Krupa, and Kenny Clarke (Percussion), Ella Fitzgerald and Tania Maria (Vocalists), and Duke Ellington, Eddie Condon, and Count Basie (Ensemble).

Texts by Stewart and Harrison plus anecdotes from many of the musicians photographed round out this book to provide a unique look at a world many of us find fascinating but few are privileged to know well. Y.K.

Washington: Portrait of a City, photographs by Steven Gottlieb, introduction and text by Frank Getlein. Washington, D.C.: Acropolis Books Ltd., 1985; 175 pp. with 94 color photographs; hardcover, $38.

Like New York, London, and Paris, Washington, D.C. has been photographed so frequently that one wonders what more could possibly be said, visually, about this center of power, culture, and simple day-to-day living. Yet, thanks to Steven Gottleib’s distinctive eye for vantage point, graphic detail, and glowing color saturation, Washington: Portrait of a City is a superb portfolio of cityscapes that manages to evade every cliché known to the tourist trade.

Whether transforming the buildings surrounding the Mall from a mere collection of cultural edifices to a bird’s eye view of some mystical, magical domain, or closing in on a patch of water lillies at the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Gottieib portrays the otherwise prosaic with a passion that is seldom found in collections of this kind. Y.K.

A Royal Album, by Patrick Lichfield. North Pomfret, Vt: Hamish Hamilton/David & Charles, Inc., 1985; 151 pp. with 103 photographs in black-and-white and in color; paperback, $16.95.

Timed to coincide with a major exhibition of treasures from the various stately homes of Great Britain that will be touring the United States this year, this collection of photographs should delight Anglophiles everywhere. What sets it above a simple souvenir album of the Royal

Family at work and at play is the high caliber of Lichfield’s work and the technically informative nature of the anecdotes that accompany many of the images. Y. K.

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The Hologram Book, by Joseph Kasper and Steven Feller. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632; 1985; 216 pp., hardcover, $22.95; paperback, $15.95.

Holograms, whose three-dimensional images are uncannily realistic, remain a mystery to most photographers. The Hologram Book demystifies the subject and explains the optical principles responsible for producing the various kinds of holograms. The book is written in an understandable—if you proceed slowly—manner and without any mathematics. Although it’s not a how-to text on making your own photograms, a short section describes the basics and tells you where to get detailed information. E.H.S.

Early Soviet Photographers, by Daniela Mrazkova and Vladimir Remes, edited by John Hoole. New York: Universe Books, 1985; 88 pp. with 84 blâck-andwhite photographs; paperback, $ 12.50.

It takes a book like this to make us realize that while we in the Western world are increasingly educated about photography’s progress in Britain, France, and the United States, we know little—if anything—about the course of photography within the Soviet Union.

Of the 16 photographers (Max Alpert, Dmitri Dyebabok, Semyon Fridlyand, Boris Ignatovich, Yelizaveta Ignatovich, Yakov Khalip, Georgi Lipskerov, Moisei Nappelbaum, Georgi Petrusov, Alexander Rodchenko, Galin Sanyko, Arkadi Shaikhet, Abram Shterenberg, Viktor Tomin, Solomon Tules, and Georgi Zelma) included in this volume which deals with Soviet photography in the 1920s and ’30s, only Rodchenko’s name and work are somewhat familiar. We are, therefore, all the richer for this introduction to the work of these hitherto unknown artists, as well as for the insights into Soviet life that their images provide. Y.K.

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Opportunities in Photography Careers, by Johnson, Mayer, and Schmidt. National Textbook Company, 4255 W. Touhy Ave., Lincolnwood, IL 60646; 1985; 147 pp., hardcover, $9.95; paperback, $6.95.

This newly revised book is an excellent reference to consult if you want to make photography your life’s work. It describes the advantages and disadvantages of many photographic and photographicrelated jobs; it also summarizes salaries, and educational requirements. Most valuable are the multitude of listings, with addresses, of schools, workshops, professional organizations, publications, and other sources that can help in exploring these careers. E.H.S.

Special Effects Photography, by Kathryn Livingston. Amphoto, 1515 Broadway, New York, NY 10036, 1985; 144 pp., hardcover, $24.95; paperback, $ 16.95.

Darkroom manipulation, multiple exposures, and constructing surrealistic settings are some of the ways photographers depart from making realistic images. Livingston gives a biography of eight successful special-effects practitioners, shows 90 color examples of their work, and describes the essentials of how the pictures were made. The book will not give you detailed instructions on replicating the photographs, but it should serve as an priming pump for your own creativity. In addition, it’s an exciting book to browse through. E.H.S.

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Gisèle Freund: Photographer, by Gisèle Freund with introduction by Christian Caujolie, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers, 1985; 224 pp. with 200 photographs including including 50 in color; hardcover, $45.

Known here primarily for her portraits of French and British literati of the 1930s, Gisèle Freund took her first steps in photojournalism when, as a young German sociology student/photo hobbyist, she attended a political demonstration. She was, as she notes, the only photographer at what was to become the last open public expression of political differences for nearly 15 years—Hitler became chancellor of the Reich some nine months later. Whether her photographs were published at that time is not clear; nevertheless, her talent for reportage is clearly apparent even in these early images.

Greatly expanded from the 1975 Dial Press monograph devoted to her work, this book presents not only Freund’s portraiture but her photoessays on poverty in England in the mid thirities, the 1935 International Congress for the Defense of Culture, views of Mexico, Latin America, and Paris. The result is a collection of impressive beauty and sensitivity. Y. K.

The Romance of Architecture, photographs by Roloff Beny with introduction by John Julius Norwich. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc. Publishers, 1985; 312 pp. with 211 black-and-white photographs; hardcover, $49.50.

Over the years the late Roloff Beny traveled widely through southern Europe, the middle East, and the far East. He was fascinated by the still-remaining vestiges of ancient civilizations and his photographs are a marvel of architectural detail and majestic broad expanse.

This book places particular emphasis on architecture, dealing in turn with walls, columns and colonnades, arches, aqueducts and bridges, domes—both from the exterior and the interior, ceilings, roofs, staircases, floors and pavements and, finally, towers, spires, and castles.

It is a must for anyone who is interested in the intricacies of stonework and for any admirer of Beny’s work. Y.K.

Salem House Concise Guide to Photography, by Michael Freeman. Salem House, 47 Pelham Rd., Salem, NH 03079, 1985; 176 pp.; paperback, $ 11.95.

With no wasted words, this cameracase-size manual presents a wealth of practical information on taking pictures, and gives just a bit of technical information on equipment. It’s well-illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Probably the most useful aspect of the book are its many checklists, which highlight essential procedures and facts. Fn the section on indoor lighting, for example, are five ways to counteract the green cast given by fluorescent lamps, and in the section on depth of field, are reasons for using deep and shallow front-to-back sharpness. There are hints for doing aerial photography, shooting underwater, traveling with your camera, shooting urban and rural landscapes, making indoor and outdoor portraits, and many others. If you want essential information fast, this book is a way to get it. E.H.S. O

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