Article: 19550401046

Title: candid shots

19550401046
195504010046
PopularPhotography_19550401_0036_004_0046.xml
candid shots
This Year’s Contest
When to Use Flash in the Darkroom
New Ansco Pan Roll Film
Tell Us What You Like
Cleanliness Is Next to—Impossible!
The Comic and the Bow-Wow
Bischof’s Japan: A Show
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
candid shots
48
48,122,123
article
It’s April again, and along with the crocuses and snowdrops comes that other annual spring event—the announcement of POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY'S $25,000 International Picture Contest; see page 126. This year, as a bonus feature, we re taking up a challenge that’s often been flung at us: “How are picture contests run.
the Editor
Photographs
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candid shots

This Year’s Contest

It’s April again, and along with the crocuses and snowdrops comes that other annual spring event—the announcement of POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY'S $25,000 International Picture Contest; see page 126. This year, as a bonus feature, we re taking up a challenge that’s often been flung at us: “How are picture contests run. and how can I be sure of getting my share of the loot?” Bruce Downes has prepared the article What You Should Know About Prize Contests, which contains more of the inside stuff on the subject than has ever been assembled in one place before. So now there’s practically no excuse for your not winning. Get your entry in early!

When to Use Flash in the Darkroom

How would you photograph the partly developed image of a roll of film during development? That’s the problem we gave Dan Becker wrhen we assigned him to do this month’s article on development by inspection (page 82). To make it even harder, we demanded not one, but a whole series of photographs showing the film at various stages of the development process, just as it appears to the eye by the dim light of a green safelight. Becker decided to use flash, which would utterly fog the film, of course, but not before its images were recorded. So he exposed several rolls identically, of a simple stilllife arrangement. Dropping the first roll in the developer, he waited until onefourth the normal immersion time had elapsed, removed the film, and made his first flash exposure. Ruined: one roll of film. He put another of the rolls in the tank and kept it there for half the normal time, then took another flash picture. He repeated the process at all stages from one-fourth to twice normal development

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Bob Mentken : a self-portrait with pietures around him. ( See his work on pages 62-65.) Bob will have a one-man show at the Peter Cooper Gallery in New York, April 1 to May 4.
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time-and the result was incorporated in our story. It's a handy technique to know about . . . if you're on an expense ac co u

New Ansco Pan Roll Film

Our hats are off to Ansco for taking still another pioneering step in roll-film progress-a move that is bound tt crc~ttc new enthusiasm for photography among the tens of millions of snapshot makers and "candid-flash' addicts whose only demand is "clear pictures." Briefly, Ansco is switching its amateur roll film from an ortho to a pan standard-the first American manufacturer to do so. As of March 1 this veai. Plenachrome, Ansco's general-purpose orthochrornatic roll film, has been joined by a new pan-

Tell Us What You Like

POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY keeps an editorial linger on your pulse. We want to know your reaction to every article and feature we print: Is it a subject that interests you? is it well presented visually? Is the writing clear and eas tu follow? Do you feel, when you finish, that you've learned something worth while? The answers to all these questions fit together to form your general impression of a story. Rate each one in this issue on the checklist below, according to its interest and usefulness to you, and mail to Candid Shots, POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY, 366 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. Our thanks in ads' a nec!

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the Editor

chromatic roll film at the same low price as ortho film (45 cents for a single 120 or 620 roll). The name of the new film, which will also be available in the 127 and 616 sizes, is Ansco All-Weather Pan.

Main advantage of any panchromatic film over ortho and so-called color-blind (blue-sensitive) films is its sensitivity to all the colors of the spectrum so the various hues of the scene are reproduced in approximately the same relative brightness as they appear to the eye. Reds, lips particularly, reproduce as shades of gray instead of as dead black, so that results look more like detailed "photographs” and less like “soot-andwhitewash” representations when film processing is entrusted to photofinishers. In fact, Ansco has shown us a convincing exhibit of how their new panchromatic roll film has broadened the commercial photofinisher’s margin for error when his printing machine operator misjudges the exposure-compensating requirements; also, how the new material has less tendency to produce blocked-up highlights when exposed by a single “flat” flashbulb right beside the camera lens. Ansco Pan is half a stop faster to daylight than Plenachrome— with an ASA exposure index of 64: its tungsten speed, 50, is a full stop faster than Plenachrome’s. Its thick emulsion has substantial inherent exposure latitude as an all-purpose roll film should. The new' film has a number of additional features that reflect a sound long-range attitude toward the growth of the beginning photographer: the enclosure of a detailed instruction sheet with each package of film; heat-sealing of each roll in a plastic pouch that is impervious to atmospheric conditions; instructions printed on the back of the duplex paper leader: etc.

Ansco Pan film is for amateur use.

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(Continued jrom page 48)

It is not competitive in any way with Ansco Supreme pan roll film, which also has a 64 '50 speed rating and which will continue to be available in the same roll-film sizes as well as in 35-mm and 70-mm widths. Ansco Pan has somewhat higher inherent contrast than Supreme, a slightly-coarse grain pattern

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New packaging for new Ansco Pan: bright red body, white ends, small blue panels.
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(which is quite adequate for moderate enlargements), and somewhat less sensitivity to red than Supreme, which is a so-called Type B pan material.

Once again Ansco has reaffirmed the pioneering attitude that in 1931 produced the first “fast” orthochromatic amateur roll film, Plenachrome, which could take snapshots in the rain, as well as the first “superspeed” panchromatic film— Ansco Ultra Speed and Superpan Press (in 1937), the result of newly developed red sensitizers. Ansco All-Weather Pan —their latest development—is the result of a new emulsion technology which has made attractive low pricing practicable.

Cleanliness Is Next to—Impossible!

If you’ve already read the Ernst Haas story (pages 68-79), you’ll remember that Ernst was once tossed out of a photo school for his indifference to neatness in

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Werner Bisthof
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the darkroom. Here’s a sidelight: Bob Schwalberg, who wrote our story, shared a darkroom with Ernst at one time. Bob, who is a pretty good darkroom housekeeper, had to nag Ernst regularly to get him to do even so much as rinse out a developer tray when he finished. He had begun to think his entreaties were bearing fruit, when one day he unlocked the darkroom door and found everything apparently covered with snow—floor, working surfaces, trays, sink, even the enlarger. He set to work with a sponge, and for three hours built up a string of imprecations to pour on Haas if he should come in. He didn’t, and Bob finally called him—called him just about everything in the book. Ernst was incredulous at the other end of the phone. “But Schwalberg,” he said, “I was so careful. When I finished, I took the sponge and I . . . Ohhh!” Then he realized he had mopped up every square inch of the darkroom with hypo!

The Comic and the Bow-Wow

Television star Orson Bean took time off from preparing a new comedy series for CBS-TV to act out a short script,

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Harvey Shaman
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The Bachelor and the Baby (page 106), in front of the cameras of photographer Harvey Shaman. The baby, Jaye Smith, daughter of POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY’S Associate Editor Carol Smith, stole the attentions of Bean from his dog, Brady. The dog, a ham at heart, whined, broke away from his leash twice, but didn’t succeed in getting into his master’s act. Anyway, here they are—together at last.

Bischof’s Japan: A Show

Last month we reviewed the late Werner Bischof’s recently published Japan, and reproduced some of the outstanding pictures from this sensitive camera portrait of a land and its people. This month, residents and visitors in the Chicago area will have an opportunity to view more than 50 of Bischof’s Japanese photographs, in color and black-andwhite, at the Chicago Art Institute. The exhibit will run from March 10 through April 17.