Article: 19370801060

Title: What's New in the Trade

19370801060
193708010060
PopularPhotography_19370801_0026_007_0060.xml
What's New in the Trade
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
64
64,73
article
APPEALING to the throngs of new picture takers because of their moderate price, capability and trim, modern appearance, a new series of Kodak Juniors in six models, designated as Series II, is announced by Eastman Kodak. These new Kodaks come in two sizes: Six-16 (2½ x 4¼) and Six-20 (2¼ x 3¼), each size with three different lens equipments, single, Kodak Bimat and Kodak Anastigmat ƒ 6.3.
Photographs
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What's New in the Trade

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New Eastman Kodak Junior.
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APPEALING to the throngs of new picture takers because of their moderate price, capability and trim, modern appearance, a new series of Kodak Juniors in six models, designated as Series II, is announced by Eastman Kodak.

These new Kodaks come in two sizes: Six-16 (2½ x 4¼) and Six-20 (2¼ x 3¼), each size with three different lens equipments, single, Kodak Bimat and Kodak Anastigmat ƒ 6.3.

The Six-16 and Six20 with ƒ 6.3 lenses have Kodex and Kodon shutters respectively, each with time and bulb action and shutter speeds ranging from 1/25 to 1/100 second. Focusing is done by revolving the lens mount.

Those with Kodak Bimat lenses, which are in focus mounts and equipped with Kodon shutters, also have shutter speeds from 1/25 to 1/100 second, with time and bulb action.

The single lens Juniors have good-quality fixed focus lenses, the Six-16 with a Kodal shutter and the Six-20 with a Kodo shutter. Both can be set for instantaneous snapshots and time exposures. All models carry both waist level and open frame, direct view finders.

The price range is from $9.25 for the Six20 with single lens to $15.75 for the Six-16 with Kodak Anastigmat ƒ 6.3 lens.

THE Camera House, Inc., 145 E. 60th St., New York City, has been appointed Eastern Distributor for Hornstein Photo Sales of Chicago. Among the products included will be Faultless Pan Heads, Splicers, and Time Alarms, Samson Tripods and cases, Faultless Slide Boxes, Masks, and Weston Meter Cases.

INEFFECTIVE immediately, the present JLL/ Model “A” Argus Projector has been discontinued and is replaced by the new improved Model “B,” priced at $32.50. The additional important improvements include a new automatic rear aperture glass release which relieves all pressure when advancing film. This prevents drag and eliminates the possibility of film scratches or damage to emulsion. The projector is provided with a ground and polished silvered mirror reflector and a patented head absorbing filter to protect film under all conditions.

JOHN G. MARSHALL. Inc., inform us that their No. 1 set of colors won honorable mention in the 1937 Modern Packaging Exhibition. The box is finished in white lacquer and bears a silver and crimson

label. The interior is finished in silver and has been designed by the well known portrait painter, Lucile Robertson (Mrs. Marshall). Possibly the outstanding feature of the package is a glass palette which covers a white mat. On this, spaces are marked off which bear the names of the various colors, a great convenience to the colorists.

EASTMAN has now made its Pola-screens available for use on amateur “still”

cameras as well as on amateur motion picture cameras.

For amateur “still” cameras, the Polascreens Type 1A come in four sizes, designated as Series V, VI, VII and VIII. For each size is available a range of adapter rings with which the Pola-screen can be fitted to the lens mount of practically any camera. Separate lens hoods are also

available.

With a Kodak Pola-screen, pictures can be taken obliquely through glass or water so that the details beyond are clearly visible without objectionable surface reflections. Surfaces—metal surfaces excepted— can be photographed obliquely so that reflections interfering with renditions of surface detail or with good composition, can be

subdued. The blue sky, in pictures made at right angles to the sun’s ray, can be recorded in any shade from light to quite dark gray in black-and-white pictures.

When pictures are being made in full color with Kodachrome, subjects can be made to stand out strikingly against a dark blue sky. This method of darkening the sky is the only one possible in color photography.

THE Filmo Streamline 8, new 8 mm. camera just announced by the Bell & Howell Company is not only “palm size,” as this company advertises, but it is palm fitting as well. This newest Filmo is the .same size as the original Double 8, and, as the illustration shows, its die-cast aluminum case is designed along the flowing lines which characterize everything these days, from motor cars to ocean liners.

The serious 8 mm. amateur will welcome the single-frame device on the Streamline 8, a mechanism which permits the user of 8 mm. film to enjoy animation work. The table-top enthusiast will enjoy making motion pictures of jointed dolls and animals, and movies of the toys in action under the tree next Christmas. A new exposure guide is built into the camera, a guide which permits quicker light readings. Choice of two speed ranges is available, 8-16-24-32 and 16-32-48-64 frames per second.

The lens is a Taylor-Hobson 12V2 mm. ƒ 2.5, fully corrected for both black-andwhite and natural color film and is instantly interchangeable with an almost unlimited selection of other lenses. 1-inch and iy2-inch lenses are mounted directly for the Streamline 8, and the camera is equipped with two viewfinder masks outlining the exact fields encompassed by these lenses. In addition, an expensive adapter makes possible the use on this camera of any lens supplied for the Filmo 70 line of instruments.

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New Filmo Streamline 8.
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The Streamline 8 retains the same sturdy and accurate mechanism which powers previous Double 8's, and threading this camera is simplicity itself. You simply attach the end of the double-width film to j the take-up spool and, without threading any sprockets at all, drop both spools on j their spindles with the film passing through j the gate. When you close the camera door j the gate is automatically closed and the i accurate, gear-driven footage dial is set at j the starting position.

Before the motor runs down to the extent that there no longer is sufficient power | to move the film at a constant speed, the | power is automatically cut off, thus insurj ing uniform exposure from the beginning j of the run to the end. End-fog is at a min! imum in the Streamline 8, for when all film has been run onto the take-up spool, the very end of the film remains taut, in the gate, preventing the exposed film from spiralling'loose on the take-up spool and becoming light-struck.

ANEW Agfa film spool prepared especially for the Argus miniature camera is now on the market. The new item, an 18-exposure film furnished on a special daylight-loading spool to fit the Argus ! Camera, uses the fast Agfa Superpan emulI sion, well-known to miniature-camera us[ ers. Superpan has been selected by its makers from many types available as the ! most ideal material for photography with the Argus, because of the desired combination of high speed, full color sensitivity, and fine grain. The 18-exposure spool of Agfa Superpan film for the Argus, which sells for 50c, is available at all photographic dealers.