Article: 19370801052

Title: Pictures That Sold

19370801052
193708010052
PopularPhotography_19370801_0026_007_0052.xml
Pictures That Sold
Cameras can be made to pay their own way. Here's a collection of interesting pictures successfully sold by our readers.
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
55
55
article
“I ALWAYS carry my camera with me, set for instant action,” writes Joseph Silberman, a Philadelphia POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY fan. And alert Mr. Silberman was rewarded with a “scoop” action shot which sold to newspapers and syndicates throughout the country.
Photographs
55

Pictures That Sold

Cameras can be made to pay their own way. Here's a collection of interesting pictures successfully sold by our readers.

“I ALWAYS carry my camera with me, set for instant action,” writes Joseph Silberman, a Philadelphia POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY fan. And alert Mr. Silberman was rewarded with a “scoop” action shot which sold to newspapers and syndicates throughout the country. The Philadelphia Daily News, a tabloid, en-

Media
Media
Tragedy.
Media
Media

larged this photo to cover its front page; the Inquirer gave it top, two-column space on the front page; the Record spread it upon the top of three columns, front page.

Mr. Silberman snapped this picture through the windshield of his car—his print shows a shadowy foreground which is the automobile’s hood. His Contax was set at the ƒ 2.8 stop, the shutter at 1/25 second. This picture was taken at a distance of about 28 feet on a cloudy day, within a few seconds of the moment the truck killed little Catharine Redman and injured her companion.

The driver was freed by a jury, due mostly to evidence shown in this picture. According to law, this truck with its 10,000 lb. load ti'aveling at 30 miles an hour should have been able to stop within 30 feet of the point of contact on the wet, cobblestoned street. Inspection of the picture shows that the driver actually did stop within 22 feet.

BUT the amateur does not have to be equipped with a Contax, nor have to be at the scene of a fatal accident to obtain sales-worthy pictures. Alfred H. Holden, a Germantown, Tenn., reader tells us that he successfully illustrates articles with a No. 3 Brownie box camera, and with a second-hand film pack camera which cost $2.50 in a pawnshop.

Remember the legendary hero who began lifting a calf daily, and continued until he was lifting a grown bull? One of Reader Holden’s neighbors tried this stunt, and Holden snapped the nicture showing the h u sky gentleman with 800 lbs. of cattleflesh on his shoulders. The picture sold to the Atlanta Journal and the Portland Sïinday Telegram & Press for a total of $13; to a London picture agency for $3, and then to

Media
Media
Strong Man.
Media
Media

two London tabloids for $10; and finally to the Kansas City Star, the Southern Ruralist, and to Grit for $3 each. A total of $35! [Plus $3 from POPULAR PHOTOGRAphy—Cashier.]

Mrs. Irene Cox of Hollow Rock, Tenn., is another reader who doesn't need a lot of expensive equipment to make the grade. She has sold more than a hundred photographs to newspaper rotogravure and magazine sections, and won over a hundred dollars in photographic contests

—yet she uses only a small box camera. * * *

FROM Montgomery Mulford, Buffalo, N. Y., comes the picture of the postage stamp. This being a hobby field, Mulford states that the remuneration for philatelic photography is seldom very large. He also supplies juvenile magazines with articles and good photographs.

Quoting Mr. Mulford, “Magazines such as Youth’s World (Chestnut St., Philadelphia) use photographs; a number of

Media
Media
Philatelic.
Media
Media

mine, in series, have been placed there. They serve young people, thirteen to sixteen years of age.

“Youth’s Comrade (Kansas City, Mo.) often accepts photographs with articles devoted to such subjects as the out-ofdoors. I have found this firm, of which Edith Lantz is editor, very cordial.

“Magazines such as Storyland (St. Louis, Mo.) ask for photos of child and animal subjects of human interest to young children, six to eight years. Numerous young people’s .magazines of the various church publication societies, nice to deal with, desire specific photographs.

“Human interest, nature, invention, activities of boys and girls—these are some of the photographic subjects. But photos must be good, and each publication has its own standard of merit.”

THE tombstone Chase the Barber was taken by Walter S. Chansler, of Bicknell, Ind. The subject here is claimed to be the smallest tombstone in the world—it measures 4x6 inches. Mr.

Chansler photographed the tiny stone from several angles, and received $6 for two acceptable shots. Typewriter and camera have earned him $3,000 from spare time activity.

Media
Media
Sombre.
Media
Media

Incidentally, there’s quite a market for historical, unusual, and humorous gravestones. W. Bethel, 166 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, Illinois, notified us that he pays $3.00 each for acceptable negatives of epitaphs on tombstones, and on request he will send a sheet describing his needs and methods of this branch of photography to anyone interested.

Media
Media
Old Dobbin.
Media
Media

HOMER S. Chambers, of Tulsa, Okla., has sold a wide variety of farm and neighborhood subjects to publications seeking amateur contributions. His picture of a horse sold to the Tulsa World for $3 and was printed on the paper’s first page—because this particular Old Dobbin was being “retired on a pension” after 21 years pulling a mine gin.

SUMMING up, wo feel that our photographic contributors will agree that the photos on this page are not unusual from the standpoint of technical excellence. Their value is that they are newsy, odd, historical—human! Take them that way, and your pictures will sell. _