Article: 19370801022

Title: Taking the August Cover in Color

19370801022
193708010022
PopularPhotography_19370801_0026_007_0022.xml
Taking the August Cover in Color
1542-0337
Popular Photography
Bonnier
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24
article
TO DATE the great bulk of direct color photography which has been executed for reproduction on magazine cover and advertising illustration has been the result of careful advance planning, laborious preparation in studio and on location, and time-consuming adjustment of lighting facilities.
Photographs
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Taking the August Cover in Color

TO DATE the great bulk of direct color photography which has been executed for reproduction on magazine cover and advertising illustration has been the result of careful advance planning, laborious preparation in studio and on location, and time-consuming adjustment of lighting facilities.

POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY, ever mindful of the problems confronting both amateur and professional, and eager to contribute its mite toward the advancement of various branches of photography, has been pondering over the possibilities of color as a medium for the type of picture which must be made under conditions akin to those with which the press cameraman and candid shooter are most familiar.

The recent presentation of the “Water Follies of 1937,” held at the Chicago Stadium and starring Eleanor Holm Jarrett, presented an opportunity to try an experiment in fast shooting with a one-shot color camera. Arrangements were made to take a color shot in the dressing room.

A rush call was made to James M. Hoddle, instructing him to pack up his color camera, some lights and film, and meet a member of our staff at the Stadium an hour before the performance. On arriving at the Stadium they discovered that the former Olympic champion had been unavoidably detained, and were obliged to await her arrival which was fifteen minutes before the opening of the performance.

The hockey team dressing room which was being used did not offer much by way of artistic background but rather a jumble of clothes on wall hooks, and

folding chairs. A small drape was quickly found and hung; the color camera in the meantime was being set up and three light reflectors adjusted. With only a matter of a very few minutes to place and focus his camera, Hoddle made a

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Eleanor Holm Jarrett in her dressing room, ready to be photographed in color.
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last-minute check on his equipment, then made the exposure just as POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY’S staff member was in the act of making a candid camera picture of the swimmer with a Kodak Bantam Special. Did you notice him on the cover, lower left?

So on this month’s cover we give you Eleanor Holm Jarrett, holder of every world’s record in back stroke swimming and best known woman athlete in the world, photographed in color a matter of minutes before her appearance in the “Water Follies of 1937” in Chicago.

James Hoddle used a Stanley Young Precision Color Camera, 3Vi x 4%, one Hammer and two Ilford plates, 1/100 second exposure at ƒ 9, three G.E. photoflash bulbs operated with a Kalart synchonizer.