Article: 19880101097

Title: She Wants her MTV

19880101097
00058950
200050_19880101_058950.xml
She Wants her MTV
0032-1478
Playboy
HMH Publishing Co., Inc.
Profile
172
172
article
"I'd love to have lunch with Tipper Gore," laughs Carolyne Heldman, 25, one of the new breed of video jocks on MTV. "I can't believe her husband is running for President." Of course, you'd expect an MTV v. j. to take issue with the infamous Tipper, the wife of Senator Albert Gore, who has helped launch a crusade to protect America's youth from what she sees as the corrupting influence of rock 'n' roll and music videos. "I don't think they're harmful to kids," says Heldman. "The videos are no worse than what they're getting on regular television. And if the women in videos care to exploit themselves in that way, then they should be able to. There's reverse exploitation, since the men are taking off their shirts and posing. What's good for the goose is good for the gander." After working for a year and a half as a disc jockey at a small radio station in Aspen, Colorado, Heldman sent an audition tape to MTV, which was looking for younger talent to suit the music channel's target audience. "The first five v. j. s stuck with it too long," she explains. But Heldman apparently isn't burdened with the same superloyalty to MTV as her predecessors. "Gosh, if someone offered me a movie role, I certainly wouldn't turn it down."
Robert Crane
172

"I'd love to have lunch with Tipper Gore," laughs Carolyne Heldman, 25, one of the new breed of video jocks on MTV. "I can't believe her husband is running for President." Of course, you'd expect an MTV v. j. to take issue with the infamous Tipper, the wife of Senator Albert Gore, who has helped launch a crusade to protect America's youth from what she sees as the corrupting influence of rock 'n' roll and music videos. "I don't think they're harmful to kids," says Heldman. "The videos are no worse than what they're getting on regular television. And if the women in videos care to exploit themselves in that way, then they should be able to. There's reverse exploitation, since the men are taking off their shirts and posing. What's good for the goose is good for the gander." After working for a year and a half as a disc jockey at a small radio station in Aspen, Colorado, Heldman sent an audition tape to MTV, which was looking for younger talent to suit the music channel's target audience. "The first five v. j. s stuck with it too long," she explains. But Heldman apparently isn't burdened with the same superloyalty to MTV as her predecessors. "Gosh, if someone offered me a movie role, I certainly wouldn't turn it down."

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