Article: 19840702032

Title: PEOPLE

19840702032
198407020032
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PEOPLE
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Actress Margot Kidder has long been passionately outspoken for nuclear disarmament. In 1980 she capitalized on her fame as reporter Lois Lane in Superman to campaign for antinuclear Democratic presidential hopeful John Anderson in the United States although, as a Canadian, she could not vote for him.
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PEOPLE

Actress Margot Kidder has long been passionately outspoken for nuclear disarmament. In 1980 she capitalized on her fame as reporter Lois Lane in Superman to campaign for antinuclear Democratic presidential hopeful John Anderson in the United States although, as a Canadian, she could not vote for him. Two years later she helped elect Jane Fonda’s husband, Tom Hayden, to the California state assembly by throwing a splashy fund raiser at her Malibu home, and last year in Ottawa she told a press conference that testing the cruise in Canada would make Canadians “allies in an evil

arms race that could lead _

to Armageddon.” Next month the 35-year-old Yellowknife native, married to French film director Philippe de Broca, will turn real-life journalist and cover the Democratic convention in San Francisco for Vogue magazine. Already she has been trailing the candidates around the country with a clear motive: “I don’t want my daughter to get burned up.”

Best-known for his devastating impersonations of Pierre Trudeau, Robin Williams and Jerry Lewis, SCTV star Martin Short will pack up his parodies and move to New York in August to join NBC’s late-night comedy show, Saturday Night Live. Short’s departure

comes as the weekly SCTV _

signs off for the last time. The producers, exhausted by its eight-year run, also had lost several key cast members including John Candy, Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas. But SCTV specials and a movie are planned.

Short, a veteran of improvisational theatre, is not worried about moving from tape to a live show. He may even, with his manic energy, help shake Saturday Night Live out of its ratings doldrums by making it more spontaneous. After working on Second City’s meticulous sketches,

Short, 34, is confident about his leap to a show

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Kidder: a passionately outspoken actress turned real-life reporter
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that he characterizes as “hip, New York and shocking.” Loyal to the last, Short declared last week, “The challenge for me is still to live up to the standards of

SCTV.”

ollowing Judy Garland’s footsteps down the yellow-brick road was a daunting task, but a freckle-faced 10year-old from Vancouver, Fairuza Balk, survived four months playing Dorothy, the Kansas farm girl, without missing a day’s shooting for a nonmusical successor to MGM’S 1939 classic, The Wizard of Oz. The new, $25-million Walt Disney feature, scheduled for release next summer, is based on later books in L. Frank

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Balk: an irrepressible, freckle-faced Dorothy chosen from thousands
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Baum’s 14-volume Oz series and includes the adventures of less familiar characters over the rainbow. Balk won the part in January after auditions in 10 North American cities attracted thousands of aspiring Dorothys —nearly 400 in Vancouver alone. She quickly became a favorite of fellow cast members Jean Marsh, Piper Laurie and Nicol Williamson at England’s Elstree Studios, where her irrepressible cheerfulness made up for the absence of happy-go-lucky munchkins in the new production. “Before I got here, I felt like Kansas,” explained Balk. “But now I feel like the land of Oz. Sometimes I forget that I’m not Dorothy. I really do.”

he dog jumped onto my lap and started working at the typewriter,” Victoria novelist Leon Rooke insisted. “I just let him run with it. Then I figured out whose dog it was.” The result was Shakespeare's Dog, and Rooke’s boisterous account of a dog’s life with the bard of Avon won the 1983 Governor General’s $5,000 award for English-language fiction last week. The other winners: Toronto poet David Donnell for Settlements; Suzanne Jacob, a Quebec-born writer who now lives in Paris, for her novel Laura Laur; Quebec City poet and critic Suzanne Paradis for Un goût de sel; retired Calgary lieuten_ ant-colonel Jeffery Williams, who now lives in England, for his biography Byng of Vimy; Montreal criminologist Maurice Cusson for Le contrôle social du crime; Winnipeg playwright Anne Chislett for Quiet in the Land; and Montreal actor René Gingras for his first play, Syncope. Most of last week’s winners acknowledged their victories with appropriate enthusiasm. “It was like walking in an enchanted forest,” said Rooke, who also confessed that the day after was more like “sitting under the heels of a fat elephant.” He is wondering how well it can write.