Article: 19641001053

Title: RACING REVIEW

19641001053
196410010053
CycleWorld_19641001_0003_010_0053.xml
RACING REVIEW
NATIONAL NUMBER ONE TAKES WINDBER
ARGENTINE CHAMP TO CALIFORNIA
ROEDER WINS WHEN EAST MEETS WEST
THE ENDURABLES
MANN DOES IT AGAIN AT 175-MILER
AMATEUR 75-MILE RACE
75 MILE AMATEUR/EXPERT 250cc RACE
75-MILE NOVICE 250cc RACE
THE SPORT AND INDUSTRY IN SWEDEN
NATIONAL SCRAMBLES CHAMPIONSHIP
CHAMPIONSHIP TUNER'S TROPHY
0011-4286
Cycle World
Bonnier
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article
National Number One. Dick Mann of Pinole. California, captured his first National Championship of 1964, the Windber (Penna.) 50-Mile Road Race, astride his perfectly tuned Matchless G-50. Roger Reiman (H-D) set fastest qualifying time and gained the pole position, with Gary Nixon (Triumph), defending champion of the Windber event, sitting alongside.
CAROL A. SIMS
BENGT BJORKLUND
Photographs
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RACING REVIEW

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Through the first turn at Windber go Gary Nixon (9), Roger Reiman (55), Dick Mann (1), Ralph White (15) and Ronnie Rall (52). GERALD WEST PHOTOS
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CAROL A. SIMS

NATIONAL NUMBER ONE TAKES WINDBER

National Number One. Dick Mann of Pinole. California, captured his first National Championship of 1964, the Windber (Penna.) 50-Mile Road Race, astride his perfectly tuned Matchless G-50. Roger Reiman (H-D) set fastest qualifying time and gained the pole position, with Gary Nixon (Triumph), defending champion of the Windber event, sitting alongside. Gary was first into the turn followed by Reiman and Mann. For four laps they held these positions, then Reiman grabbed the lead. Three more tours and Mann took second from Nixon, who had trouble in the backstretch two laps later that cost him more positions — to Larry Schafer (H-D), Ronnie Rall (H-D), George Montgomery (BSA) and George Roeder (H-D). Reiman moved on out, and Roeder was charging up from 7th spot until the loss of his front brake caused him to slow slightly.

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Looking every inch the champion he is, Dick Mann guides his Matchless G-50 to first National victory of the season.
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By the 42nd of 63 laps, Mann was methodically closing the gap on Reiman. Six laps later Roger had only a 12 second lead and was told to GO! This may not have been the reason, but on the very next turn he dropped his No. 55, and Mann scooted by, smiling from ear to ear. In a few moments Reiman was back in the race, running second. The rest of the pack was led by Schafer and Montgomery, one full lap behind. Although he really charged, Reiman just couldn't catch the high-flying Mann before the checkered flag fell. Montgomery was third; Nixon got past Roeder for fourth.

Billy Lloyd clocked fastest time trial in the amateur division, and was ahead of the crowd when they went into the first turn. He also had the lead nailed down after one lap, but lost his machine on the backstretch and Bob Sholly (Triumph) led the field on the second complete tour. Sholly looked like a shoe-in as he swooped around the course with no apparent worries. Then, with only five laps to go, hard-charging William Werner (H-D) came on strong. Two or three times it looked as if he would take Sholly, but not until the last 1,000 feet of the race did Werner finally nose by for the win. Third went to Pat Gosch (Triumph), fourth and fifth to Joe Weeden (BSA) and Hal Burton (Triumph).

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Enduro champ Sal Scirpo ponders how George Roeder will get an engine in No. 94, one hour and 11 minutes before start of the 50-Mile National event.
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William Werner (94) pulled a last lap spectacular, nosed out Bob Sholly by inches for amateur honors at Windber.
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AI Hollingsworth (H-D) had very little trouble capturing the nçvice win.

ARGENTINE CHAMP TO CALIFORNIA

A distinguished newcomer to the United States is Seep Neubauer, four-time Speedway racing champion of Argentina, twice runnerup, and a successful competitor in Europe and the Scandinavian countries as well. He also spent seven months in Russia coaching their speedway team, but has declined an invitation to return, understandably preferring the sunny climes of Southern California.

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Of Austrian ancestry though Argentine-born, Neubauer has settled with his wife and children in Ontario, Calif, where he operates a foreign car shop at 1325 West D Street. Shown storming along on his J.A.P. in the accompanying photo, he is interested in contacting promoters and others with regard to races, exhibitions and/or coaching of fledgling speedway riders.

ROEDER WINS WHEN EAST MEETS WEST

The long awaited duel between the East and West on a "neutral" half-mile finally materialized, and the easterners, (Continued on page 58) after a hard fight, beat the westerners into grudging submission. The event was the 7-Mile National, the place was Lakeside Speedway in Kansas City, Kansas, a smooth, all-groove oval with high banks and wide turns. Westerners threw in every big gun, except the biggest, Elliott Schultz; the East had all of their top riders, except Ronnie Rail.

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KEN ROBINSON
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Winsome trophy girl makes the presentation to 7-Mile Champion George Roeder, while excellence of Babe DeMay's second place performance is apparent in faces of his crew.
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It was immediately apparent that George Roeder liked the race track. In a style reminiscent of Carroll Resweber's, he laid his machine into the turns with the power on, sliding to fastest overall time trial before beating out California's Bob Bailey in the first of three 10-lap heat races. Then Babe DeMay turned back National Champion Dick Mann for the second preliminary win, and nearly everyone made a hasty switch to the same cut Pirelli tires he was using. Sammy Tanner took the third 10lapper over Mert Lawwill, finalizing a topflight field which left many of the nation's best half-mile riders sitting in the pits. Ralph White, Darrel Dovel and Duane Shadley had not run fast enough to make the final, while Gary Nixon and Everett Brashear fell in their heat races, fortunately without injury.

Five riders from the west and seven from the east and midwest were on the starting line for the 14-lap final. Mann jumped to an early lead with DeMay, Roeder and Markel right behind. During the first laps it appeared that Mann was going to take the big one back to California, until lap ten when Roeder passed both him and DeMay for the lead. The last four laps sent the hopes of the west right out the window as DeMay moved to second with Markel running an itchy third ahead of Mann, Tanner and Lawwill (who lost his face shield in the late going). Final score: East 1-2-3, West 4-5-6.

Only bright spot for the west was Dan Haaby's complete runaway in the amateur class heat race and final, although fast time honors went to the east's leading yellow plate rider Garry Hall, twotime amateur winner at Nationals this year. Hall had a big lead built up in his heat race before retiring with a faulty magneto.

7-MILE NATIONAL FINAL 1. GEORGE ROEDER. Monroeville, Ohio H-D 2. BABE DEMAY, Moline, III. H-D 3. BART MARKEL, Flint, Mich. H-D 4. SAMMY TANNER, Long Beach, Calif. BSA 5. DICK MANN, Pinole, Calif. BSA 6. MERT LAWWILL, San Francisco, Calif. H-D 7. ROGER REIMAN, Kewanee, III. H-D 8. TONY DENIUS, Denver, Colo. BSA 9. RON NELSON, Palmdale, Calif. Triumph 10. NATHAN WATTS, Oklahoma City, Okla. BSA 11. DAVE BURLEIGH, Tulsa, Oklahoma Matchless 12. BOB BAILEY, Torrance, Calif. Triumph Time: 6:09.91

14-LAP AMATEUR FINAL 1. DAN HAABY, Sacramento, Calif. H-D 2. JOHN ZWERICAN, Clio, Mich. H-D 3. DENNIS HAPPEL, Evansville, Ind. H-D 4. PHIL HAWK, Glendale, Calif. BSA 5. GEORGE CURTIS, Richmond, Calif. BSA 6. PAT GOSCH, Omaha, Nebr. BSA 7. TOM PFIEFER, Cedar Rapids, Iowa BSA 8. GEORGE HOLTER, Kansas City, Mo. BSA 9. JEFF RANDALL, Oklahoma City, Okla. BSA 10. HARLEY PHILLIPS, Hutchinson, Kans. H-D 11. STEVE SHUMAK, Urbana, III. H D 12. DEWEY McCREARY, Kansas City, Kans. Norton Time: 6:27.98

THE ENDURABLES

On a recent Sunday evening, amid the sounds of wild cheering and blaring automobile horns, two weary young men climbed from the saddles of their Yamahas and claimed an unofficial world's endurance record: 31 hours of continuous riding. Leroy (Butch) Harwood, 20, of Seattle, and John (Sonny) Millar, 13, from Snohomish, Wash., riding 80cc and 55cc Yamahas respectively, started their run at 1:30 PM on Saturday and ended it at 8:30 PM Sunday.

The boys rode all through Saturday night, stopping only twice for their allotted 2-minute rest stops. They were also allowed 10-second gas stops, but on these they had to remain on their bikes with engines running. In 31 hours of continuous operation (the engines were never turned off) the only pit stops made were for gas.

The event was sponsored by Ken Smith, owner of Ken's Cycle & Sporting Goods in Edmonds, Washington, and run on a course laid out in the parking lot of his new shop in Snohomish. When asked how they felt after their long ordeal, both Butch and Sonny summed it up in one word — "tired!"

MANN DOES IT AGAIN AT 175-MILER

Dick Mann, the racing redhead from California, came through for the second straight weekend to score another major road race victory on his trusty Matchless G-50. The scene was the new Greenwood Roadway located south of Des Moines, Iowa, a rider's course from start to finish with every type of turn and straightaway conceivable on the three-mile track.

The drop of the flag for the 59-lap grind found Gary Nixon in front with Jody Nicholas, Mann, Dick Hammer and Roger Reiman glued to his rear wheel. Nixon, fastest qualifier by nearly two seconds on his flying Triumph, held a narrow lead through the first five laps with Nicholas, Reiman and Hammer taking shots at running second. Jody moved from third to first at the start of lap six with Nixon less than a length behind. The two rode this way until Gary again grabbed the lead at the 36-mile mark but Nicholas repassed him after one trip around the dampened track that was still drying from an earlier rainstorm.

Hammer made a bid for the lead on lap 13, advancing as far as second before running off the course and then finally being forced out with a burned piston on the 15th lap. Mann moved to second and it became a two-man race as he and Jody stretched it out over Nixon and Reiman. Near the 60-mile mark the leaders lapped ninth place Buddy Elmore, who retired two laps later with mechanical problems.

At the end of 24 laps Nicholas held a scant one-second edge on Mann. The next lap found the Tennessee ace in for a gas stop which lasted 15 seconds and cost him first place. Mann continued to step up the pace and soon built his lead to well over a minute. Jody, meanwhile, had encountered sticky throttle problems, and bombed into the turns using brakes and kill button only to keep him in second and on the track. Mann made a quick pit stop for gas at the 95-mile point and scooted back on the track without endangering his position. Nixon again moved to second after Jody's pit stop and whittled Dick's advantage to five seconds before pulling in with a faulty magneto. Reiman rapidly closed the gap on Nicholas, who was using up his brakes (Continued on Page 60) at a fast clip. Moving alongside, Roger passed Nicholas for runnerup spot on the final lap, and Jody unloaded on one of the many switchback turns soon afterward. He quickly remounted, but not before Ralph White had moved by to take third at the finish.

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National point leader Bart Markel fell during the event but rejoined the fray and wound up 10th. George Roeder wasn't so lucky. His hopes of winning the Grand National title this year were dimmed when he crashed in practice and was hospitalized with a broken arm and a severe gash on the forehead.

Mann averaged a fantastic 77.555 mph for the 175-mile distance on an alternately wet and dry race track that gave the riders a most demanding test of their road racing abilities.

AMATEUR 75-MILE RACE

Dan Haaby, top-rated western amateur, switched from dirt to pavement racing and again came away a winner, this time in a driving rainstorm. He led off the line at the start of the 25-lapper aboard the Bob Hansen Matchless G-50, with another Californian, Joe Scalzo on the Neil Keen BSA, running second. Scalzo was forced back to third on lap 5 due to a wet magneto, and Triumph-mounted Bob Skowmal took over runnerup position and closed in on Haaby. The Downers Grove, 111. pilot continued to turn it on, taking the lead on lap 8 and holding it for five laps. Haaby then regained the front spot and went on to win, scoring his third straight amateur national victory.

Skoumal finished second with Scalzo moving by John Zwerican on the 19th lap to regain third, only to lose it on the last time around to Pat Gosch. By the end of the race the riders were throwing water high off the track as puddles became deeper and deeper, but this didn't keep Haaby from averaging 65.934 mph.

75 MILE AMATEUR/EXPERT 250cc RACE

Clear skies and a warm day greeted amateurs and experts for the 25-lap lightweight race, and Dick Hammer topped Jody Nicholas, AI Gunter, Dick Mann and Roger Reiman in time trials. Gunter shot into the lead off the line with Mann in second and Hammer third. Hammer moved to second on lap two and the third lap found Mann's machine tying up, forcing him out of the race. Nicholas soon took the lead with Hammer a close second.

Larry Schafer, the 1964 100-mile 250 champion, moved all the way from the back of the pack to fourth by lap 4. Nicholas had built up a 15-second lead on his Bultaco by the 13th time around, but was forced to the pits on lap 14 when his shift lever fell off. Then Hammer took over the lead but soon lost it to Gary Nixon, who came from the rear after running the early laps on one cylinder. Schäfer moved by Hammer for second on lap 17 as Dick began to develop rear wheel problems. The trouble worsened, and he finally went out of the race on the 22nd lap with six rear spokes missing and many teeth off the sprocket.

At the finish it was Nixon in front by 10 seconds on his screaming Yamaha with Schafer in second, Elmore third and Gunter fourth. Although Nixon had come from way back he still managed a tremendous 76.228 mph average.

75-MILE NOVICE 250cc RACE

The little racing college student, AÍ Hollingsworth from St. Augustine, Fla., completely dominated the 75-mile novice road race event. He posted fastest novice time trial by nearly seven seconds and then went on to lead from start to finish, holding a 1 minute, 15 second advantage over Dan Deubler at the checker. The new Harley-Davidson road racing ace thus scored his third straight major win, his earlier victories coming at Warren, Ohio and Windber, Pa. Many expert riders have rated his H-D Sprint the fastest 250cc machine in the U.S. this year.

175-MILE NATIONAL 1. DICK MANN, Pinole, Calif. Matchless 2. ROGER REIMAN, Kewanee, III. H-D 3. RALPH WHITE, Torrance, Calif. H-D 4. JODY NICHOLAS, Nashville, Tenn. BSA 5. JIM KOPLINSKI, Milwaukee, Wise. Matchless 6. LARRY SCHÄFER, Washington, D.C. H-D 7. RONNIE RALL, Mansfield, Ohio H-D 8. TED HEIL, Dayton, Ohio H-D 9. GEORGE MONTGOMERY, Glenmont, Md. BSA 10. BART MARKEL, Flint, Mich. H-D 11. TED DAVIS, Ponca City, Okla. BSA (Continued on page 62)

THE SPORT AND INDUSTRY IN SWEDEN

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Husqvarna 250cc short circuit racing machine; Anders Bengtsson warms it up.
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Start of the 250cc event at Sweden's new short circuit road race course.
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BENGT BJORKLUND

SWEDEN CONTINUES to advance its status in the world of motorcycling; a point is the new Husqvarna short circuit road racing machine sponsored by CYCLE WORLD'S Swedish contemporary magazine, MC-Nytt. Powered by a new Husqvarna VM replica engine of 250cc displacement, the frame is modified from a motocross machine used by Sweden's scrambles ace Torsten Hallman. Forks are Norton and the gearbox is the same as used on the moto-cross machine. Carburetion is by a huge 35mm Amal GP unit, and a tuned exhaust is fitted.

Eighteen-year-old newcomer Anders Bengtsson raced the machine in its debut at the opening of Sweden's new Ring Knutstorp racing circuit in Heisingborg. Though he fell during the race, he had qualified the bike quite high and hopes are running strong for MC-Nytt's new machine. The Knutstorp circuit is on the grounds of a famous old moto-cross race course which is no longer used.

The Husqvarna factory has added another member to their team of moto-cross riders. He is 21-year-old Ake Jonsson, who finished third and second in two heats of the Swedish world's moto-cross championship and took second in the Finnish motocross GP. He and the remarkable Torsten Hallman will ride in the 250cc GP's in 1965 for Husqvarna. •

12. DARREL DOVEL, Waukegan, III. H-D 13. JOE MESSAROS, Fairborn, Ohio BSA 14. GARY NIXON, Baltimore, Md. Triumph 15. MERT LAWWILL, San Fransisco, Calif. H-D 16. ANSON HOLLEY, Baton Rouge, La. H-D 17. BUDDY ELMORE, El Paso, Texas Triumph 18. CHUCK JORDAN, Lincoln, Nebr. BSA 19. DICK HAMMER, Lakewood, Calif. H-D 20. JOHNNY TIBBEN, Chicago, III. H-D Time: 2 hr., 16 min., 51 sec. 75-MILE AMATEUR/EXPERT 250cc 1. GARY NIXON, Baltimore, Md. Yamaha 2. LARRY SCHÄFER, Washington, D.C. H-D 3. BUDDY ELMORE, El Paso, Texas Yamaha 4. AL GUNTER, Alhambra, Calif. Yamaha 5. RALPH WHITE, Torrance, Calif. H-D 6. JOE SCALZO, Los Angeles, Calif. Yamaha 7. MERT LAWWILL, San Francisco, Calif. H-D 8. DON SHIFLETT, Kansas City, Mo. H-D 9. ROGER REIMAN, Kewanee, III. H-D 10. JODY NICHOLAS, Nashville, Tenn. Bultaco 11. DON HODGE, Victor, N.Y. Ducati 12. RONNIE RALL, Mansfield, Ohio Honda 13. CHUCK ANDREWS, Webster, N.Y. Ducati 14. BOB SKOUMAL, Downers Grove, III. Bultaco 15. DOUG GERHART, Trumbauersville, Pa. H-D Time: 59 min., .02 sec. 75-MILE AMATEUR 1. DAN HAABY, Sacramento, Calif. Matchless 2. BOB SKOUMAL, Downers Grove, III. Triumph 3. PAT GOSCH, Omaha, Nebr. Triumph 4. DON HODGE, Victor, N.Y. Triumph 5. JOE SCALZO, Los Angeles, Calif. BSA 6. ARNOLD LONG, Champaign, III. H-D 7. JIM RÖHN, Lincoln, Nebr. Triumph 8. DAVE JACKSON, Toronto, Canada Matchless 9. DOUG PARRISH, St. Louis, Mo. H-D 10. BILL WERNER, Bethlehem, Pa. H-D Time: 1 hr., 8 min., 15 sec. 75-MILE NOVICE 1. AL HOLLINGSWORTH, St. Augustine, Fla. H-D 2. DAN DEUBLER, Sioux Falls, So. Dakota Yamaha 3. TORELLO TACCHI, Chicago, III. Ducati 4. TOM PAGE, New Windsor, III. Honda 5. RAY SULKOWSKI, Chicago, III. Honda 6. JACK PATTERSON, Peoria, III. Ducati 7. GABE RUDAVICIUS, Cicero, III. Ducati 8. BOB TEMPLE, Bloomington, III. H-D 9. DICK JAMESON, Chicago, III. Ducati 10. BILL LUGER, Ohama, Nebr. Ducati Time: 1 hr., 3 min., 38 sec.

NATIONAL SCRAMBLES CHAMPIONSHIP

Nestled in a cleared area within a lush jungle of greenery is the Sunset Riders M.C. scrambles track, scene of this year's National Scrambles Championship near Butler, Pennsylvania. The starting line lies on top of a hill. From there the course goes downhill, makes a sharp left turn at the bottom, then begins an uphill, third gear climb to the top. Though unable to see over his crest, riders must prepare for a sharp, offcamber left, followed by a brief straight which leads to the next left-hander. Another short, second gear section precedes the jump, a low shelf-like affair that can be taken full bore in second gear. A gradual, banked-left downhill section follows the jump and, halfway down, turns into a

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Charlie Vincent and his Triumph took Sweepstakes honors.
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California's Billy Holcomb, new National 250cc Scrambles Champion, in action on his Sprint.
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flat right-hander, completing the halfmile course.

Nearly 150 top eastern riders were on hand, joined by several California contenders, including Jim Hunter, Bill Riley, Pete De Rosa, Billy Holcomb and Jim Parks. Western riders were high in their praise of the oiled shale track, the organizational aspects of the event, and the helpfulness of Andy Zanotti, Butler's gracious H-D dealer. Zanotti made his shop facilities available to the visitors and lent every possible assistance — including the loan of a customer's gearbox to Billy Holcomb, which enabled him to cop 250cc Sweepstakes honors over Zanotti's own riders. (!)

Quite a few top riders encountered the kind of troubles that make racing the "iffy" sport it is. Jody Nicholas was leading his semi-final when his Bultaco tied up on the next to last lap; Smiley Hulbert unloaded in the Class 8 semi, and Eddie Moran retired with engine problems in the same event. Californians Hunter and Riley had their share of woes, too. Hunter went wire-to-wire in his Class 7 heat race and main, then got off first at the start of the Sweepstakes. On the first lap, however, he hit neutral while downshifting from 3rd to 2nd, went wide and killed the engine of his BSA. The field was half a lap ahead by the time he got going again, but Hunter barrelled up to fifth place before the 15 laps were over.

Riley's BSA had begun to falter in the late stages of the Class 8 semi-main, though he held on for the win. Then in the Sweepstakes, running on only one cylinder, he persistently dogged leader Charlie Vincent, almost passing him in the turns. Vincent, who rode a good smoothly consistent race, with no mistakes, stayed in front for the full distance and nabbed National Championship honors on his well-tuned Triumph.

SEMIFINALS Class 1 — Up to 100cc/125cc 2-cycle Alan Munroe (Conn.), Bultaco Bond Way (Penna.), Bultaco John DiSimone (Penna.), Bultaco Dick Bettencourt (Mass.), Bultaco Class 2 — lOlcc - 125cc/2-cycle to 175cc Joe DiSimone (Penna.), Bultaco Peter DeRosa (Calif.), Bultaco Vincent Lattur (Ohio), Bultaco Ward King (Ohio), Bultaco Class 3 — 0HV 126cc - 150/ÛHC up to 125cc/2-cycle 176cc - 200cc Bill Eves (Penna.), Bultaco Bob Robinson (N.Y.), Bultaco Raymond Martino (Penna.), Bultaco Clyde Confer (Penna.), Bultaco

Class 4 — OHV 151cc - 200cc/OHC 126cc - 175cc/ SV 201cc - 250cc/2-cycle 201cc - 250cc Dick Bettencourt (Mass.), CZ Norm Robinson (N.Y.), Greeves Joel Hartley (Ohio), Yamaha Larry Glas (Penna.), Greeves Class 5 — OHV 201cc - 250cc/OHC 175cc • 250cc Bill Holcomb (Calif.), H-D Bennie Bowden (Mich.), H-D J. M. Allen (Ohio), H-D James Parks (Calif.), H-D Class 7 (No Class 6) — OHV 350cc - 500cc/SV 351cc 750cc Jim Hunter (Calif.), BSA George Singler (Ohio), Triumph Donald Fagan (W. Va.), Triumph James Smith (Penna.), Triumph Class 8 — OHV 501cc - 751cc/SV 501cc - 650cc Bill Riley (Calif.), BSA Ray Durham (Penna.), Triumph Charlie Vincent (Conn.), Triumph Pete Madden (Mass.), Triumph Class 9 — Open 14 started, 3 finished Ordel Ozenbaugh (Penna.), H-D Tom Hodges (Ohio), H-D Bob Finnick (Ohio), Norton NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP, Class 1 to 5 Handicap Start Bill Holcomb (Calif.), H-D, Class 5 Bennie Bowden (Mich.), H-D, Class 5 Bill Eves (Penna.), Bultaco, Class 3 Alan Munroe (Conn.), Bultaco, Class 1 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP, Class 7 to 9 Charlie Vincent (Conn.), Triumph, Class 8 Bill Riley (Calif.), BSA, Class 8 Ray Durham (Penna.), Triumph, Class 8 Pete Madden (Mass.), Triumph, Class 8 Jim Hunter (Calif.), BSA, Class 7

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Wildman Ordel Ozenbaugh, open class winner, was a real crowd-pleaser on his Harley at Scrambles National.
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CHAMPIONSHIP TUNER'S TROPHY

When the AMA Grand National Champion is crowned at season's end this year, his tuner will also share in the glory, thanks to the P.A. Sturtevant Company of Chicago, manufacturers of torque wrenches. The company is awarding an annual trophy, under the direction of the AMA, which is inscribed as follows:

"This is the highest award a tuner in the motorcycle field can receive. The master tuner's trophy stands as a tribute to all motorcycle tuners, who seldom have the opportunity to share in the prestige and glory of the winning rider. It has become an accepted custom for the rider to receive the trophy, kiss the queen, be interviewed by the press, and admired by everyone. This trophy is an inspiration to every tuner and gives special recognition to the master tuner for his allimportant contributions to the winning machine. It is the hope of the P.A. Sturtevant Co. that tuners will someday share an equal position with riders, and we hope to make tuners immortal by symbolizing them with an instrument of their trade, the torque wrench."

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All well and good, but do they have an alternate trophy design featuring BSA, Triumph or Matchless engine, just in case? •